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FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 



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Bulletin of 

Armstrong Junior 
College 

1936—1937 



4 City supported Junior College of Savannah, Georgia 




For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1936—1937 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 

A City supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 









"Education is a companion which no misfortune can depress — 
no crime destroy — no enemy alienate — no despotism enslave. At home, 
a friend; abroad, an introduction; in solitude, a solace; and in society, 
an ornament" 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



The city of Savannah extends the privileges of Armstrong 
Junior College to those who are qualified for admission and 
desire to enrich their lives through education. Standards of 
work maintained in the College are such as to be especially 
inviting to students of good or superior ability. Students are 
expected to pursue diligently the courses of their choice and 
to be governed by the rules of propriety. 

— The President 



A RMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



CALENDAR 1936—1937 



l : all Quarter 

Physical examination September 16 

Freshman registration September 17 

.man preliminary tests September 18, 19 

Upperclassman registration and 

physical examination September 21 

Opening exercises September 22 

All classes begin September 22 

Armistice Day address November 1 1 

Thanksgiving holidays November 26 — 29 

Examinations December 15 — 19 

Christmas holidays December 21 — January 3 

Winter Quarter 

Registration January 4 

All classes begin January 5 

Robert E. Lee address Januarv 19 

Annual ball January 22 

Georgia Day address February 1 2 

George Washington address February 22 

Examinations March 15 — 17 

Spring Holidays March 19 — 23 



Spring Quarter 

Registration March 23 

All classes begin March 24 

Memorial Day address April 26 

Examinations June 1 — 4 

President's reception June 4 

Commencement sermon June 6 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 




Reception Hal 




View of the Library 



6 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

General Information 

College Commission 8 

Faculty 8 

History, Organization, and Aims 9 

Library 10 

Laboratories 11 

College Book Store 11 

Gifts to the College 11 

Athletic Policy 12 

Requirements for Admission 13 

Fees, Tuition, and Refunds 15 

Enrollment Procedure 16 

Physical Examinations 17 

Preliminary Tests 17 

Student Advisers 17 

Student Load 18 

Explanation of Course Credit 18 

Transfers from other Institutions 18 

Transfers to other Institutions 18 

Reports and Grades 18 

Honors 19 

Cooperation with the Examiner of the 

University System of Georgia 20 

Final Examinations 20 

Repetition of Course 20 

Attendance Regulations 20 

Rules on Personal Conduct 21 

Withdrawals 21 

Dismissals 21 

Number Required in Courses 21 

Student Activities 21 

Entertainments, Plays, and Lectures 23 

Holidays 23 

Adult Education 23 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 7 

I MM I OF OON rENTS Continued) 

Pa 

Courses of Study .... 27 

Liberal Arts 27 

I fome Economics 27 

Requirements for Graduation 28 

Finance and Commerce 29 

Course requirements for Graduation 30 

Description of Course Subjects 

Division of Exact Sciences 33 

Biology 33 

Chemistry 34 

Physics 34 

Mathematics 35 

Division of Languages 36 

English 36 

Humanities 37 

French 37 

Spanish 37 

Roman Historical Literature 38 

Division of Social Sciences 38 

Social Sciences 38 

History and Political Science 39 

Economics 40 

Psychology 40 

Sociology 40 

Commerce 40 

Home Economics 42 

Physical Education 43 

Library Science 44 

Freshmen Enrolled 1935 — 193b 45 



THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 



\ Pratt Adams 
mas Gamble 



Chairman 
l e-( 'hairman 



I li.Nl-n BU N 

II 1. R LTON 

1 ILNRY \1. GARWES 
1 lERBERT F. GfBB NS 

Herschel \ . Jenkins 
Herbert L. Kay ion 



Mrs Mills B lane 

A B. LOVETT 
FRANK W. Spencer 
O. B. Str 

Mrs Lucy B. TROSDAL 
Miss Ola M. Wyeth 



THE FACULTY 1 



Ernest A. Lowe, B.S.C. 



J. Thomas Askew. Ph.B.. M.A., 
and Instructor in Social Sciences 



I' ■ rid* tit 

I ' 



William S. BOYD. B.S., University of Georgia; M.A.. Emory University. 
Instructor in Biology. 

FRANCES Ennis. B.S.H.E., Georgia State College for Women; A.M. in 
Household Arts Education, Columbia University. 
Instructor in Home Economics. 

MARGARET FORTSON. A.B.. LL.B.. and M.A.. University of Georgia; Certificat, 
La Sorbonne, Paris. 

Instructor in English. 

ARTHUR M. GigN'ILLIAT. A.B.. and M.A.. University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Mathemetics. 

Foreman M. Hawes. A.B.. Mercer University: M.S.. Emory University. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

RELBEN W. HOLLAND. A.B. and M.A.. Emory University. 
Instructor in Romance Languages. 

DOROTHY HORTON MILLER A.B.. Oglethorpe University; B.S.. in Library 
Science. Emory University. 
Librarian. 

MARGARET SPENCER. B. Mus., Converse College: A.B., University of Georgia 
MA.. Columbia University. 

Executive Secretary and Assistant Instructor. 

* Four additional teachers will be selected during the summer of 1936 



I IISTOIO 0RGANIZA1 ION, \\n AIMS 

For the past few years, Savannah and the surrounding com- 
munity have felt the need for an institution of higher learning. 
Realizing that there is an increasing number of young men and 
women who find it inconvenient or inadvisable to continue their 
education at out-of-town colleges, Mayor Thomas Gamble and a 
group of leading citizens conceived the idea of establishing a junior 
college in Savannah. These men, working tirelessly over a period 
of months, finally saw their hopes become an actuality when on \ [ay 
27, 1935, the city council authorized the establishment of a muni- 
cipal ly supported junior college to be governed by a commission of 
fourteen members appointed by the mayor. The day before the 
ordinance creating the college was passed, Mayor Gamble an- 
nounced that the problem of housing the new school was solved by 
Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, 
who had generously presented their beautiful house as a memorial 
to George F. Armstrong, husband and father, respectively, of the 
donors. Due to the many spacious rooms, remarkably few changes 
were necessary to fit the building for college purposes. The Arm- 
strong building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, is one of the 
most beautiful college buildings in the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded the 
Lucas Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in founding the 
Junior College. In his speech of acceptance Mr. Gamble announced 
that he had received the gift of a building from Mr. Mills B. Lane 
to house classes in Finance and Commerce, the building to be named 
in honor of the donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane building is the 
auditorium and recreation building erected and equipped by the 
city of Savannah and the federal government at a cost of $70,000. 
All three buildings, standing side by side, face on Forsyth Park, 
the most beautiful park in the city, which consists of forty acres 
and is used by Armstrong students for recreational purposes. The 
Georgia Historical Society library, to which the students have ac- 
cess, faces the park and lies just across Whitaker street from the 
College buildings. 

The Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah and 
the adjacent community by giving to the young men and women 



10 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

who attend its classes an understanding of the world in which they 
live and an appreciation of the best that has been achieved by 
western civilization. Its graduates are equipped to continue their 
studies in the junior class of a senior college; but for those who do 
not desire to pursue their work elsewhere, terminal work is offered. 
The college attempts to provide its students with a broader con- 
ception of the world and its problems and a keener realization of 
the duties and responsibilities of citizenship. 

Library 

The college library and reading rooms are located on the first 
floor of Armstrong building. The furniture is walnut, finished to 
blend with the walnut paneled room. The seating capacity of the 
two reading rooms is adequate to seat one-fourth of the student 
body. 

The book collection is being carefully chosen and gives indi- 
cation of growing rapidly. There are at present 4,500 volumes. 
The collection is especially strong in biology and social science 
material with a fair representation of other subjects. The engineer's 
council of the Chamber of Commerce presented a technical library 
of several hundred volumes; this gift and others have added strength 
to various sections. 

The reference section contains standard encyclopedias, diction- 
aries, and reference tools chosen with the needs and demands of 
junior college students in mind. The library subscribes to sixty-six 
magazines, many for general reading and some technical and pro- 
fessional. Subscription to four daily newspapers is maintained. 

In addition to the college library, the students have access to 
the Savannah Public Library and the Library of the Georgia His- 
torical Society, which is one-half block from the Junior College. 
These libraries cooperate in supplying not only general reading 
matter, but also books especially used in the courses of study. 

The aim of the library is to meet the demands of junior college 
students by providing material necessary to a more complete under- 
standing of their studies and to stimulate their interest and enjoy- 
ment in recreational reading from the best of the older and modern 
writers. A course in the facilities and use of the library is required 
of all students. This provides a better understanding of books and 
a more intelligent use of the library. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 11 

[Tic library is under the cue of .1 trained librarian and student 
assistants. It is open thirteen hours each day of the week, with 
the except ion of Sunday, when the library is closed. 

Laboratories 

1 aboratories for chemistry and biology form an important 
part o\ the instructional equipment of this institution. Both lab- 
oratories are well equipped with facilities for handling sections of 
twenty students. In addition to the regular laboratory in biology, 
demonstrations which arc provided are indispensable aids in the 
teaching of human biology. A museum is being established which 
will furnish examples of many marine as well as inland forms of 
plants and animals. 

The College Book Store 

A book store is provided for the convenience of the students. 
Textbooks and classroom supplies are available at cost plus a mini- 
mum charge for handling. 

Gifts to the College 

No college was ever more fortunate in having good friends 
who have in so many instances through substantial gifts satisfied 
needs of the institution. This is truly a city college; scores of 
Savannah citizens have contributed in some way to its establish- 
ment. 

Soon after it was known that the College would open in Sep- 
tember Mr. Boykin Paschal President of the Junior Chamber of 
Commerce, volunteered the services of that organization in the col- 
lection of books for the library. At the call of this group of progres- 
sive business and professional men, hundreds of Savannahians con- 
tributed books from their private libraries. Some two thousand 
volumes were delivered to the College by the Junior Chamber. 
Through their efforts, these gentlemen gave the College a collection 
which will be of permanent value. 

Mrs. B. F. Bullard, for many years a friend of education in 
this state, gave the College fifty volumes selected from her library 
and $100.00 with which to buy books to be selected by the College 
Librarian. This sum was spent on selected reference material for 
the courses in western civilization. 



12 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

During the winter of 1935 Mr. Mills B. Lane, an outstanding 
Savannah citizen, purchased the home of Judge George T. Cann, 
which adjoins the College property, and presented it to the Com- 
mission to be used to house classes in Finance and Commerce. This 
gift, with the gift of the original college building by Mrs. Lucy M. 
C. Moltz and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, is the largest 
that has thus far been made. The Cann house will be conditioned 
for college use during the summer of 1936 and opened in September. 

Two friends of the College, both desiring to remain anony- 
mous, have made contributions valued at $2,000 each. One gift 
was for the purpose of making in the auditorium certain changes 
which will greatly increase the usefulness of the stage; the second 
gift was several hundred very valuable and useful books. 

In acknowledging gifts, the College wishes to express apprecia- 
tion of the many books and periodicals presented by Mayor Thomas 
Gamble. Mayor Gamble is a frequent visitor at the College and 
he seldom comes without bringing one or more carefully selected 
volumes for the library. 

The College also wishes to express its appreciation of the stu- 
dent scholarships given this year by Mrs. Joseph Brooks Abrams, 
of Brunswick, the Pan-Hellenic Association, the Pilot Club, the 
Business and Professional Women's Club, the Federation of 
Women's Clubs, the Landrum Masonic Lodge and the Bar Pilot's 
Association. The National Youth Administration has given the 
College a number of scholarships, thereby providing educational 
opportunities for several excellent students. 

These gifts, and those of scores of other loyal friends whose 
names can not be mentioned in the short space provided in this 
bulletin, represent substantial contributions to the development of 
the College. The administration, faculty, and students wish to ex- 
press their appreciation. 

Athletic Policy 

The administration and faculty of Armstrong Junior College 
believe that any program of education at the junior college level 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 13 

should include ample provision for training in physical education 
and a veil planned system of intra-mural sports, [t is thought that 
in classes in physical education cspcci.il emphasis should be placed 
on training in those spoils which carrj over into adult life. 

It will, therefore, be the policy o\ the institution to require all 
able-bodied students to take courses in physical cJuc.it ion during 

the freshman and sophomore years. The courses will include three 
one-hour periods a week and \\ ill carry one course credit at the end 
of each year. In connection with the recreation periods a system 
of intra-mural sports w ill be developed. Sports that will be empha- 
sized include golf, tennis, swimming, track, basketball, soft ball, 
and such other games as student aptitude may indicate. 

Intercollegiate competition in sports will be confined to those 
sports in which a sufficiently large number of students are proficient 
to warrant the selection of an intercollegiate team. Students 
selected to represent the College on such teams will come from the 
regular classes in physical education, and in no instance will it be 
the policy of the institution to seek to attract students for their 
athletic ability alone. 

This institution recognizes athletic ability along with other 
student abilities which it seeks to develop in its program of training 
for citizenship. It does not, however, believe that a program of 
sports should be pursued at the expense of academic standards. 

Requirements for Admission* 

No student will be accepted unless he is recommended as capa- 
ble of doing college work by the high school from which he has 
graduated. 

A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior College must 
be a graduate of an accredited high school with fifteen units of 
credit. A general average of all high school work amounting to five 
points above the passing grade, when figures are used, or one step 
above passing, when letters are used, will be required. 

The following specific requirements must also be met: 

1 . Eight constants — 3 units in English, 2 units in social studies, 

* See foot note on the following page. 



14 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



2 units in Mathematics (one must he in algebra), and 1 unit 
in science.* 

2. Seven or eight electives — 4 of these electives must be from 
the following subjects: English, social studies, mathematics, 
science, and foreign language. 

4 units may be from the vocational and avocational groups: 
Agriculture, home economics, commercial art, music, physi- 
cal education or from any of the subjects mentioned in the 
paragraph above. 

* For the year 1936 classical students deficient in cither one unit in science 
or one unit in social science will be accepted, but two additional college courses 
in the field of the deficiency will be prescribed. No deficient students will be 
accepted after September 1936. 

ENTRANCE UNITS 



SUBJECT 



TOPIC 



UNITS 



English A 
English B 
English C 
English D 



History A 
History B 
History C 
History D 
Economics 
Social Studies 



Mathematics A 
Mathematics B 
Mathematics C 
Mathematics D 
Mathematics E 
Arithmetic 



Science A 
Science B 
Science C 
Science D 
Science E 



Latin A 
Latin B 
Latin C 
Latin D 



Group I. 

Grammar and Grammatical Analysis I 

Composition and Rhetoric 1 

Critical Study of Specimens of English Literature 1 

English or American Literature 1 

Group II. 

Greek and Roman History 1 

\ ledieval and Modern European History 1 

English Histor\ r 1 

American History and Civil Government 1 

Economics 

Social Studies 

Group III. 

Algebra to Quadratic Equations 1 

Quadratics, Progressions, the Binomial Formula 

Plane Geomet ry 1 

Solid Geometry 

Plane Trigonometry 

Arithmetic 

Group IV. 

Chemistry 1 

Experimental Physics 1 

General Science 1 

Biology 1 

Physiography 1 

Group V. 

Grammar, Composition, and Translation 1 

Second Year Latin 1 

Third Year Latin 1 

Virgil's Aeneid, I-YI, Grammar, Composition I 



l 



S \ V \ \ \ A H 



RGI \ 



15 



ENTRANQ UNITS Continued) 



st bji i i ropu 

C irOUp V. (( 'oiitiiniiit) 

Greek \ Elementary Gr amma r. Composition, rranslai 

Greek B Xenophon's Anabasis, I IV, Grammar, Composition 

Greek C 1 lomer's Iliad, I— I II. Grammar, Composition. 

m A Elementary Grammar, Composition, Translation. 

German B Intermediate Grammar, Composition, Translation 

German C Third-year Grammar, Composition, Translation 

German D Fourth-year Grammar, Composition, Translation 

French A Elementary Grammar, Composition, Translation. . 

French B Intermediate Grammar, Composition. Translation 

French C Third-year Grammar, Composition, Translation. 

French D Fourth-year Grammar, Composition, Translation 

Spanish A Elementary Grammar, Composition, Translation - 

Spanish B Intermediate Grammar, Composition, Translation 

Spanish C Third-year Grammar, Composition, Translation. .__. 

Spanish D Fourth-year Grammar, Composition, Translation 






Manual 
Training 

Agriculture 



Commercial 
Subjects 



Science E 

Art A 
Physical 

Education 



Group VI. 
VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS (Not more than four units) 

Mechanical and Projection Drawing l A to 1 

Free-Hand Drawing Y* to 1 

Shop- work Y to 1 

Agriculture 1 to 4 

Commercial Geography 1 

Shorthand 1 

Typewriting 1 

Bookkeeping 1 

Commercial Arithmetic 1 

Group VII. 

Home Economics 1 to 4 

Music 1 to 4 

Physical Education 1 



Fees, Tuition, and Refunds 

Fees in Armstrong Junior College, including tuition, library 
fee, and a $5.00 student activity fee, will amount to a total of $105 
for the year for resident and non-resident students alike, payable 
$35 upon entrance in September, $35 at the beginning of the second 
quarter in January, and $35 at the beginning of the third quarter 
in March. The student activity fee will include a subscription to 
The Inkwell, the College newspaper, and one copy of the College 
annual. 



16 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Students taking science courses with laboratory work will be 
required to pay a small fee which is indicated in the description of 
the respective courses. These course descriptions will be found 
under "( burses of Instruction" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Fall - - $35.00 Tuition and fees 

Winter - $35.00 Tuition and fees 

Spring - $35.00 Tuition and fees 

$105.00 Total 

Laboratory fees additional 

Special students will be admitted only by permission of the 
Dean. For less than three courses in any one quarter the charge 
will be $15.00 for each course. 

A late registration fee of $5.00 will be charged any student 
failing to register on the day designed for registration at the begin- 
ning of each quarter, unless excused because of sickness. 

In afternoon and evening classes a fee of $8.00 will be charged 
for one-half course, $15.00 for one course, $20 for one and one-half 
courses, and $25 for two courses, the maximum number of evening 
courses allowed for any one quarter. This rate applies to the courses 
taken within one quarter only. A course includes three eighty-five 
minute lecture periods each week. 

Auditors will be permitted to enter classes only after securing 
permission from the instructor in charge of the course. The fee for 
auditors will be $10.00. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a quarter 
will receive a refund of one-half the tuition fee. No refunds will be 
made after the first thirty days of a term, and no refunds will be 
made to those dismissed from College. 

Enrollment Procedure 

Physical examinations of all first year students will be held 
September 16, and registration of freshmen will be completed on 
September 17. No student will be permitted to register unless a 
transcript showing all high school credit earned is in the hands of 
the Dean. Considerable delay and perhaps expense may be avoided 
by attending to this matter at least one month before school opens. 

Any freshman permitted to register after September 17. will be 
charged a late registration fee of $5.00. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 17 

All freshmen applicants must register In person and follow this 
procedure : 

1. Physical cx.imin.it ions between the hours of 9 <>o .\. \1. and 
4 ()() P. \1 , September 16. 

2 Registration in Dean's office, September 17. 

I Payment of all ices in the President's office, September 17. 
This may he done at any time between the hours of 9 00 
A.M. an J 5:00 P.M. 

4. Friday and Saturday, September 18 and 19, respectively, 
will be devoted to four preliminary tests, two each day, which 
will be required of all freshmen without any exceptions. 
Tests are scheduled to begin at 9:00 A. M. and 3 :00 P. M. 

Registration and physical examination of upperclassmen will 
be completed on September 21. Any upperclassman permitted to 
register after that date will be charged a late registration fee 
of $5.00. 

Physical Examinations 

Physcial examinations will be given all students before they are 
permitted to register. The examination is an important part of the 
program in personal guidance. The physical condition of each in- 
dividual will be studied carefully and recommendations will be made 
for the improvement of his or her health. The examinations will be 
administered by the College in conjunction with the City Health 
Department. For the sake of uniformity, all students will be re- 
quired to take the examination at the time designated. Students 
not taking the examination at the appointed time will be given an 
examination at a later date and charged a fee of two dollars 

Preliminary Tests 

All students entering Armstrong Junior College will be required 
to take several preliminary tests. These tests will be made up by 
an outside examiner. Certain placement tests will also be given 
during the first week of school. 

Student Advisers 

Upon registration, each student is assigned to some faculty 
member who serves as his adviser during his college career. Before 



18 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

;in\ sophomore is permitted to register, he must receive his adviser's 
approval of all elective courses. 

All mid-term grades will be sent to the advisers, from whom 
students may receive a report of their scholastic standing upon re- 
quest. Individual teachers will not furnish the students' grades. 

Student Load 

A normal load is three and one-third courses each quarter, and 
students will be required to carry this amount of work unless special 
arrangements are made with the Dean. A student must pass seven 
courses before he will be ranked as a sophomore. 

Students who make two A's and have no grades below B for 
any one quarter may carry an additional course or a maximum of 
four and one-third courses for the subsequent quarter. 

Explanation of Course Credit 

The school year lasts nine months and is divided into three 
quarters, Fall, Winter, and Spring. A course includes five fifty-five 
minute lecture periods per week for one quarter. 

Transfers from other Institutions 

No student will be accepted from another college without a 
transcript of college work from that institution, and no student may 
enroll in Armstrong Junior College who has been dropped from 
another institution or who is on probation from another institution 
because of poor scholarship. 

A student transfering to Armstrong Junior College will have his 
credits reduced unless at least three-fourths of all grades received 
at another college are above the lowest passing grade of that college. 

Transfers to other Institutions 

No student will be recommended for transfer to other insti- 
tutions unless three-fourths of all grades received are above a D. 

Reports and Grades 
Reports for every college student will be sent by the Dean to 



OF S A \ \ \ \ \ l l GEORGIA ]" 

the parent or guardian at the end ol each quarter. 1 fie reports 
arc based upon the following system of marking: 

Grade A plus. Exceptional 4 honor points pev course 
Grade A. Superior 3 honor points per course 

Grade B, Better than average 2 honor points per course 
Grade C, Average 1 honor point per course 

Grade D, Barely passing honor points per course 

Grade E, Incomplete Minus 1 honor point per 

course 
Grade F, Failure Minus 1 honor point per 

course 

Grade E (Incomplete) — -An incomplete may be removed by 
means stipulated by the instructor of the course in which the stu- 
dent received the Grade E. An E not removed in the succeeding 
quarter automatically becomes an F. 

Honor Points — The number of honor points a student receives 
is determined by the grades he makes, each grade carrying a certain 
number of honor points: i. e., A plus, 4 honor points, A, 3 honor 
points, etc. In order to graduate, a student must receive as many 
honor points, based upon the above grading system, as the number 
of courses required for graduation. 

Honors 

Students who maintain an average of B or above in each course 
during a quarter's work will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic 
Attainment List. At the discretion of the Dean special absence 
privileges may be granted to these students. 

The 10% of each class who have the highest averages, and have 
failed no courses, will be given special recognition on Honors Day. 

Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction) will be bestowed 
upon those receiving an average of 3 honor points per course. 

All students who receive recognition on Honors Day for two 
successive years will have their names recorded on a permanent 



20 \ R M S T R O N G J U N I O R COLLEGE 

Dean's List in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the 
President. 

Cooperation with the Examiner of the 
I niversity System of Georgia 

The University System of Georgia has inaugurated in certain 
courses a uniform examination plan under the supervision of a 
trained technician. A number of these courses are offered by Arm- 
strong Junior College. With the permission of the Examiner and 
the administration of the University System of Georgia, Armstrong 
has been permitted to cooperate in this testing program. 

Final Examinations 

1. Regular written examinations are required in all courses at 
the end of each quarter. These examinations are held on the last 
three or four days of the quarter, in accordance with a permanent 
schedule. 

2. Final examinations, except in laboratory practice, should be 
limited to a period of three hours. In courses in which a considerable 
portion of the examination is of a practical nature, the instructor 
may extend the time at his discretion. 

3. Special examinations for students who have been officially 
excused from regular examinations may be held at suitable times 
fixed by the instructors concerned. Such examinations must be 
taken within the succeeding quarter, and a fee of $1.00 will be 
assessed for each examination. 

Repetition of a Course 

A student who fails in not more than one course during a 
quarter may repeat the same subject in addition to carrying a nor- 
mal load of three and one-third courses in a subsequent quarter if 
his work is generally satisfactory. Permission of the Dean is neces- 
sary and a fee of $5.00 will be charged. 

Attendance Regulations 

Students are allowed three unexcused absences per course. 
Excess absences must be satisfactorily explained to the Dean if class 
work is to continue. 



I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 21 

Upon request, special absence privileges may be granted a 
student \\ ho is on the I )ean's list . but the grant ing of such pri\ il< 
is within the discretion oi the Dean 

A student who is absent from any class two days before or 
after a holiday ov the beginning or the ending of a term will be as- 
sessed $1.00 for each day or part of a day absent. 

Rules on Personal C Conduct 

Students are requested to maintain high standards of personal 
conduct and character. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal is a prerequisite to honorable dismissal 
or re-entrance to this institution. Any student planning to with- 
draw must immediately make such intentions known to the Presi- 
dent. 

Dismissals 

All students failing (except in cases excused before examinations 
on account of sickness) to pass at least one course other than 
physical education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls 
of the College. All students who fail to make an average of three 
honor points during the first three quarters' work at the Junior 
College will not be allowed to re-register. 

Number Required in Courses 

Xo course will be given unless at least fifteen students register 
for the course. 

Student Activities 

Believing that self-discipline by the individual student has edu- 
cational value, the faculty has endeavored to create an atmosphere 
of freedom around the College. The students have been free to 
form scholarly habits, to develop individual abilities and to practice 
self-restraint in a manner becoming adults. In keeping with this 
policy, which has been very successful so far, the faculty will place 
the same responsibilities upon and give the same freedom to incom- 
ing freshmen as was done this year. The faculty is unalterably 
opposed to hazing in any form. 



22 




1 he College faculty <mJ students will hold .1 series oi closed 
dances throughout the year. Everj attempt will be made to get 
all students to participate in these dances 

[Tie faculty-student sponsored ball in honor of high school 
seniors of the cit) of Savannah was sufficiently successful in 1936 to 
warrant repetition in 1937. The ball will be held on January 22, 1937. 

The President and faculty will provide regulations for stu- 
dent organizations. Any student group desiring to hoi J any public 

meeting or social event in the name of the College or in the name of 
the student organizations must notify the President two weeks in 
advance of the meeting and find a place on the calendar kept in the 
President's office. 

Entertainments, Plays, and Lectures 

The College Glee Club assisted by the College orchestra and 
other special student talent will present concerts during 1936- -1937. 
From time to time speakers will be invited to address the students. 

The College dramatic club will present plays, and the Arm- 
strong Literary Society will hold public meetings during 1936 — 1937. 

Savannah organizations offer an opportunity for hearing excel- 
lent concerts and lectures. Speakers appearing on the program of 
the Community Forum will deliver their lectures in the College 
Auditorium, and students will be permitted to attend. Each year 
the Forum brings to Savannah at least six well known lecturers. 

Holidays 

The College calendar provides for holidays only at Thanks- 
giving, Christmas, and in the Spring. One additional holiday will 
be granted when the faculty attends the Georgia Education As- 
sociation. Although the school will not suspend classes for other 
occasions, students desiring to recognize religious holidays are 
urged to do so, and a limited number of cuts are provided for such 
occasions. 

Adult Education 

The faculty will offer afternoon or evening classes for adults. 
The same number of hours will be spent in these classes as is spent 
in those on the regular schedule. The fee will be $15 per course 
for those taking it for credit, and $10 per course for auditors. No 
course will be given when less than ten students enroll for credit. 



IA 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 









Freshman class and first 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



M 




iy of the Junior College 



26 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 



"Each pretty hand can steer a ship becalmed: but he that 
will govern and carry her to her end must know his tides, his 
currents: how to shift her sails: what she will bear in foul, 
what in fair weathers: what her springs are. her leaks and 
how to stop them : what strands, what rocks do threaten 
her: the forces and the natures of all winds, gusts, storms, 
and tempests. When her keel ploughs hell and deck knocks 
heaven, then to manage her becomes the name and office 
of a pilot." 



OF S A \ \ \ \ \ I I GEORGIA 



( I H RSI SOI STUDY 



Certificates and Diplomas 

The college will otter work leading to three different certifi- 
cates Associate in Liberal Arts, Associate in I lome Ec ;iomics and 

Associate in I'manee and Commerce. 



Liberal Arts 

The Liberal Arts course is designed for those students who 
desire a broad educational background; it is concerned with man 
and with the achievements of civilization. The course deals with 
man's natural, social, and cultural history and seeks to give the 
student an understanding of the past and its relationship to the 
present. 

When he has completed the course, the student is expected to 
have some knowledge of the fundamental principles of natural 
science, of the great movements which have directed the course of 
civilization, and of the artistic and literary masterpieces of the 
world. The student is then ready to specialize in any field he 
chooses — natural or social science, literature, art, or any other sub- 
ject which appeals to him. If, however, the student does not ex- 
pect to continue his education further in college, he is ready to go 
into his life's work better able to understand and to see in their 
proper relationships the problems of life and of society, and to ap- 
preciate more fully man's achievements and aspirations. 

By a proper selection of electives liberal arts students may 
prepare themselves for some of the technical and professional 
courses in senior colleges. Correspondence with the senior college 
concerned, should be undertaken by the student in planning such 
a course of study. 

Home Economics 

In view of the fact that an appreciation of the problems of 
home making is desirable for all young women whether they con- 



28 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

tinue work at a senior college or not, the Home Economics course 
at Armstrong Junior College is designed to help the greatest num- 
ber and, at the same time, satisfy the requirements of the senior 
college for those who wish to major in home economics. The work 
beyond the general core courses will be taken in the field of home 
economics and closely related subjects. 

With the exception of Dietetics and the course in meal plan- 
ning and table service, home economics courses have been planned 
without prerequisite so that any of these may become an elective 
for a student who does not wish to major in home economic 1 -. This 
flexibility, it is hoped, will enable many students not specializing 
in home economics to take courses in this field. 

The six courses selected in home economics arc those that will 
give a broad training, fit the girls for home making, other vocations, 
and give them a richer life. 

The home economics clothing laboratory is well equipped. 
The foods laboratory has five home kitchens and an attractive 
serving unit. 



Requirements for Graduation 



1. All students are 

Social Science 
Biology . . 
Humanities . 
English . . 
Mathematics 



-equired to complete the following courses: 

1, 2. 3. or 2, 3. 12 . . . 3 courses 

2 courses 

1 , 2 (or 2 courses in English) 2 courses 

1 or 2 1 course 

1, 2, or 3 1 course 

Physical Education 1,2 2 courses 

Total specified 11 

Electives and specified 9 

Total for graduation 20 courses 

2. At least two college courses in a foreign language will be re- 
quired of all students pursuing the course leading to an Associate 
in Liberal Arts certificate. Additional language courses will be re- 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

quired of students who wish to prepare for senior colleges requiring 
more than two college courses in language. 

I Not more than ten courses will be accepted from another 
institution toward the completion ^( work nn a certificate, and .ill 
transfer students must remain in residence for nine consecutive 
months, regardless of the number of credits received elsewhere. 

4. In order to graduate Is it necessary that the candidate have- 
to his credit as many honor points as the number of courses re- 
quired for graduation. {\ or explanation of honor points see "Honor 
Points'", page 19). 

v A student transfcring to Armstrong Junior College will have 
his credits reduced if more than one-fourth of all grades received 
at another college are the lowest passing grade in that college. 

6. Six courses in Home Economics and two courses in Inor- 
ganic Chemistry will be required of all students pursuing the course 
leading to an Associate in Home Economics certificate. 

7. For requirements in the course in Finance and Commerce 
^age 30. 

8. Library Science. A brief course in the use of books and 
libraries is required of all first-year students during the first quarter. 
This course is designed to introduce the student to the use of books 
and the resources of the library. The lesson plan is based on the 
history of libraries and printing, the card catalog, encyclopaedia, 
dictionaries, general reference tools, and the making of bibliogra- 
phies. This is a non-credit course. 



Finance and Commerce 

The Junior College offers a three-year course leading to an 
Associate in Finance and Commerce diploma. The entrance re- 
quirements are the same as for other courses offered in Armstrong 
Junior College. 

The course of study that has been devised is expected to aid 
the student in understanding himself and society, give him some 



30 



ARMSTRONG JUN'IOR COLLEGE 



knowledge of the way the world of finance, industry, and trade 
operates, and provide some training in the techniques of business. 
Before graduation the student will be required to pass a test in 
shorthand and typing and be able to operate certain specified me- 
chanical equipment now found in the more efficient business estab- 
lishments. 

The three-year course of study outlined below has been con- 
structed to meet the needs of those who will participate in the life 
of the business community, remembering that Savannah is an im- 
portant sea port and financial center. As the work is of a terminal 
nature, i. e., a complete course within itself which gives technical 
training in a specified field, only those students who wish to com- 
plete their work at the Junior College will be advised to take this 
course. If any student desires a four-year course in finance and 
commerce, he should pursue liberal arts at the Junior College with 
electives in economics and psychology, and transfer to a senior 
college after two years at Armstrong. 

By meeting all liberal arts requirements a commerce student 
may receive a certificate in liberal arts at the end of the second 
year; one additional year's work will be required for the diploma 
in finance and commerce. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Finance and Commerce 



F 


irst Year 




Social Science . 


. . 1. 2, 3 or 2. 3, 12 


3 courses 


Human Biology 


. . 11, 12 . . . . 


2 courses 


Economics . . . 


. 21, 22 ... . 


2 courses 


English .... 


. 1 or 2 ... . 


1 course 


Mathematics . . 


. . 1, 2, or 3 . . . 


1 course 


Physicial Education 


. . 1 


1 course 




10 courses 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA H 

Second and I bird Yens 

Humanities . 1 and 2 (or 2 courses in English) 2 courses 

Psychology I course 

Accounting . 1 and 2 2 courses 

Business Law 2 courses 

Corporation Finance 1 course 

Foreign Trade 1 course 

Insurance 1 course 

Labor Problems 1 course 

Marketing 2 courses 

Money and Banking 2 courses 

1 5 courses 
Electives 5 courses 

20 courses 



32 




n 



DI\ [SION 01 1 \ \ci SCIENCES 



/i/Wc 



^Y 



1 — 2 Animal Biology (4 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory per 
week. Laboratory fee $5.00) 

A course in animal biology giving attention to the general 
principles of biology, their interpretation and appreei.it ion. This 
course in designed for those wishing to continue science. 

3. Prerequisite Biology 1 — -2 

Inverterbrate Zoology (3 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
per week. Laboratory fee $2.50) 

A study of invertebrate animals including local fresh water 
and marine forms. 

4. Prerequisites Biology 1 — 2 (Laboratory fee $2.50) 

General Vertebrate Zoology — 4 lectures, 2 two hour labs per 
week. An intensive study of the vertebrate group including lab- 
oratory dissection of several types. The study will include the 
kinds of vertebrates and their distribution in time and space, verte- 
brate embryology, and details of the various vertebrate organ 
systems. Biology of The Vertebrates by Walter is the text used. 

5. Prerequisites Biology 1—2 

General Botany (3 lectures and 6 hours laboratory per 
week. Laboratory fee $2.50) 

A general survey of the plant kingdom with particular em- 
phasis on the identification and study of local forms. This course 
sets forth the important facts and interpretations with which 
botanical science is concerned. 

11 — 12 Human Biology (5 hours a week for two quarters) 
Required of all students planning to attend the University System 
of Georgia. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding 
of general biological principles, particularly as applied to the human 



34 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

organism. The first half of the course includes a study of funda- 
mental (acts of biology, human anatomy, and physiology, and the 
maintenance of health in the individual. The second half of the 
course includes studies in problems of public health, reproduction, 
and the principles of genetics, evolution, and eugenics. 

Chemistry 

1 2 General Inorganic Chemistry — 4 hours of class room 
work and 6 hours laboratory per week for two quarters. Labora- 
tory fee $5.00— Deposit $2.50. 

The first course is a study of the preparation, properties, and 
uses of a number of the non-metallic elements and their compounds. 
The fundamental laws of elementary inorganic chemistry are 
stressed. 

Course number 2 is a continuation of Chemistry 1, and in- 
cludes the preparation, properties, and uses of the more common 
metallic elements and their compounds. The laboratory work will 
offer several experiments which will serve as an introduction to 
qualitative and quantitative analysis. 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis — Prerequisite Chemistry 1. 
2 or the equivalent. 4 hours class room work and 6 hours labora- 
tory per week in Spring Quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00 — Deposit 
$2.50. 

The text used is by Louis J. Curtman. The lectures will deal 
with the theoretical aspects of the subject with special reference to 
the application of the law of mass action. The laboratory work 
will consist of a study of the reactions, precipitations, and detec- 
tions of the principal metals and acid radicals. 

Foods — (See Home Economics) 
Dietetics — (See Home Economics) 

Physics 

1 — 2 General Physics (not offered 1936—1937), (4 hours re- 
citation or lecture. 4 hours laboratory work per week, two quarters). 
Laboratory fee $2.50— Deposit $2.50. 

This course is a study of the properties of matter, mechanics 
of solids, mechanics of fluids and heat, sound, light and electricity. 



i SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

11 12 Physical Science (5 hours a week for two quarters 
Required of all students planning to attend the University Sys- 
tem ot C K 

This course is a survey of the (Musical Sciences. I he subject 

matter is taken largely from the fields of physics, chemistry, as- 
tronomy . geology, and geography. In general, the objectives of the 

course are to make one more familiar w ith the physical phenomena 
o( our environment; to develop an appreciation of the scientific 
method; and to furnish a cultural and general informational back- 
ground which may be used as a foundation for future work by 
those students whose interests may lie in the fields of Physical 
Science. 

Mathematics 

1 . A survey of Mathematics (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

The subject matter stressed in this course is of a utilitarian and 
cultural nature. Work in finance and statistics is included with a 
study of the fundamentals of algebra and trigonometry. Geometry 
as applied to mensuration is reviewed. The introduction traces the 
history of our system of computation, showing the role mathema- 
tics has played in our social development. 

2. College Algebra (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A study of quadratics; ratio, proportion, and variation; the 
binomial theorem; complex numbers; theory of equations; deter- 
minants; logarithms and the slide-rule; and permutations, combina- 
tions, and probability. 

3. Analytic Geometry (Prerequisite Mathematics 2 — 5 hours a 
week for one quarter) 

An introductory course dealing with such topics as coordinate 
systems, transformations, loci and their equations, the straight line, 
circle, parabola, ellipse, pyperbola, and the geometric interpreta- 
tion of the general equation of the second degree ; also polar coordin- 
ates and analytic geometry of three dimensions briefly. 

4. Calculus (5 hours a week for one quarter — Prerequisite 
Mathematics 3). 



ARMSTRONG J IN I OR COLLEGE 

An introductory course in differential calculus, together with a 
few lessons in integration. The course deals with the derivatives 
of algebraic and transcendental fractions, with special applications 
to the problems in mechanics and geometry. It is especiallv useful 
in the fields of engineering and science. 

14. Elements of Statistics (5 hours per week for one quarter. 
Prerequisite Mathematics 1 o 

The collection, classification, and presentation of statistics. 



DIVISION OF LANGUA( 

English 

1 . Grammar and Composition (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A review of punctuation and the fundamentals of grammar. 
Essays are read and discussed and themes are written weekly. 
Several novels are read out of class and reported on at stated inter- 
vals. The course attempts to teach the student to understand what 
he reads, to acquire a larger and more complete vocabulary, and to 
be able to organize and express his thoughts orally and in writing. 

2. Introduction to Literature (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

This course includes the reading and discussion of representa- 
tive essays, short stories, plays, and poems of the most outstanding 
English and American authors of the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Five or more novels will be used for collateral reading. 

3. Business Writing Practice I 5 hours a week for one quarc: 

4. Introduction to Poetry (5 hours a week for one qua: 

This course deals with the history of English poetry, a study 
of the various types and forms, and a reading and understanding 
of representative works from the leading English and American 
poets. 



OF S A \ \ N N \ l l . G l O R G I A 

/ lumanities 

1 2 1 lumanities (5 hours a week for two quarters) 
A sun c\ of the cultural achiev ements of \\ estern ( )i\ ilizat ion. 
The course s< ;ive the student a general understanding of the 

leading intellectual and esthetic movements of Western Europe 
and an acquaintance with the .urc.it est literary figures from 1 fomer 
to Galsworthy. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and music are 
considered. 

French 

1 — 2 Elementary French (5 hours a week for two quarters) 

The elements of French grammar are studied with a view to 
early reading. Some 450 pages of classroom and collateral readings 
are completed. Attention is given to pronunciation, composition, 
and conversation. 

No credit will be allowed until French 2 is completed. 

3. French (5 hours per week for one quarter) 

Review grammar with continued stress on composition and 
oral practice. Reading of 400 pages of standard texts. 

4. Nineteenth Century French Prose (5 hours a week for one 
quarter) 

A survey of the prose writings of the nineteenth century. 
Reading and discussion of 500 pages from representative writers. 
Reports on collateral reading. 

5. French Classical Drama (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

Representative plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. Four 
plays to be read in class and four plays to be read as collateral. 

6. French Short Stories. (5 hours a week for one quarter) 
A study of the short story in France. 

Spanish 

3. Intermediate Spanish (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A review of Spanish grammar with extensive oral practice 
Reading of selected texts from nineteenth century prose writers. 



38 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

4. I spanol (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A stud} of Spanish drama with particular emphasis on contem- 
porary authors. 

5. Commercial Spanish (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A Study of business methods in Spanish America together 
with the writing of business letters in Spanish. Extensive practice. 

Roman Historical Literature 

Latin 5 — Prerequisite. 3 years of High School Latin. 

In this course a study of Roman history will be made through 
the writings of Livy, Sallust, and Cicero. Exercises in Latin prose 
composition. 

Latin 6 — Horace. 

A studs of the odes and Epodes of Horace and Latin metric 
forms. 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Social Sciences 

1. The Foundations of Western Civilization (5 hours a week 
for one quarter) 

The political, economic, and social movements of ancient and 
medieval times are studied with particular emphasis placed on the 
movements sometimes called the Renaissance. Roman law. Chris- 
tianity, the Medieval Church, expansion of Europe, the intellectual 
quickening, religious upheaval, national monarchies, and mercan- 
tilism are given special attention. 

2. Progress of Western Civilization through the Industrial 
Revolution (lbbO — 1870) (5 hours a week for one quart 

The parliamentary system of England, absolutism. Voltaire, 
the French Revolution, the rise of capitalism, the Industrial Revo- 
lution, socialism, nationalism, the rise of the United States, the 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

influence of the American frontier, and the scientific and social 
progress of the 19th century are surveyed. 

I. rhe Contemporary World (1870 1936), (5 hours a week 
for one quarter) 

Industrialization ol the nations, imperialism, causes ol the 
World War, post-war nationalism, movements toward economic 
self-sufficiency, communism, facism, the \c\\ Deal, movements for 
world peace, and scientific and social progress of the 20th century 
are sur\ eyed. 

4. Contemporary Georgia (5 hours a week for one quarter; 

Required oi all students planning to attend the University System. 

Some of the economic, social, and political problems of Georgia 
are studied with particular emphasis on regional and national pro- 
blems which impinge, cither directly or indirectly, on our state. 
Human and natural resources, the conditions of agriculture and 
industry, and problems of state and local governments are surveyed. 

History and Political Science 

1 1. History of Georgia (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A survey of the history of Georgia 1733 — 1936. Particular 
attention will be given to the history of the government of Georgia. 

12. American Government and Politics (5 hours a week for 
one quarter) 

Principal emphasis is placed upon principles, processes, and 
problems, with some attention given to political developments 
under the New Deal. 

13. State and Local Government (5 hours a week for one 
quarter) 

A course dealing with machinery and problems of local govern- 
ment. 

14. Comparative European Government (5 hours a week for 
one quarter) 

Particular emphasis is placed on the political machinery and 



40 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

problems of England, France Italy, Germany, and Russia. Euro- 
pean governmental methods that differ from our own will be 
given special attention. 

Economics 

21. Introductory Economics (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A course which introduces the student to economic concepts 
and principles w ith due attention to modern economic institutions 
and problems. 

22. World Resources and Industry (5 hours a week for one 
quarter) 

Psychology 
31. Introductory Psychology (5 hours a week for 2 quarters) 
An introduction to the scientific study of mental life. 

Sociology 

60. Family Relationships (5 lectures a week for one quarter) 

A study of factors which have made for permanency in family 
life and changing social and economic conditions which affect fam- 
ily members to each other and community: survivals of various 
characteristics affecting family life and consideration of their worth ; 
conservation of the family and education for family life. 

COURSES IN COMMERCE 

1 — 2. Accounting (3 lectures, 4 laboratory periods a week for 
two quarters) 

Principles of single proprietorship, partnership, and corporation 
accounting; the balance sheet, profit and loss statements, and the 
theory of debts and credits. In course 2 intermediate accounting 
will be covered. 

3. Business Writing Practice (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

4 — 5. Marketing (5 hours a week for two quarters) 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 41 

A critical study of market organization and operation; func- 
tions, organization, and methods; speculation and regulation. 
Merchandising and sales promotion will be given special .it tent ion 
in 5. 

6 — 7. Money and Banking (5 hours a week for two quarters) 

A study of principles, functions, and forms of money and 
credit; analysis of mone> and credit problems; theory of money 
and banking; and banking practices. 

8. Corporation Finance (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A study of corporate financial organization, securities, man- 
agement of capital; problems of financial administration; analysis 
of causes of failures. 

9. Labor Problems (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A study of labor problems in Europe, and United States. 

10. Insurance (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

A study of the life, fire, health, and accident insurance; em- 
ployer's liability, title and credit insurance; and insurance and 
bonding companies. 

11 — 12. Business Law (5 hours a week for two quarters) 

A brief study of law from the business man's standpoint. Such 
subjects as contracts, wills, sales, negotiable instruments. Atten- 
tion is given to the historic and economic development of certain 
principles of commercial usuage. Where Georgia statutes and prac- 
tices are at variance with those of other states, the Georgia rules 
are emphasized. 

13. Transportation (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

History and regulation of common carriers in the United States 
and Europe. 

14. Elements of Statistics (5 hours a week for one quarter) 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 or 2 

The collection, classification, and presentation of statistics. 



42 A RMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

15. Foreign I rade (5 hours a week for one quarter) 

I Ik.)!\ and Practice. Special attention will be given to those 
phases of the subject of peculiar value to Savannah and the south- 
cist . 

COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS 

1 . ( Nothing (2 lectures, 3 laboratory periods per week for one 
quarter) 

This course is designed to establish appreciations, interests, 
habits, and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, design, con- 
struction, and care of clothing. Problems are provided so that 
students gain actual experience in application of these fundamental 
principles. The clothing budget is studied as an aid in obtaining 
the greatest satisfaction from the money spent for clothing. 

2. Foods (2 lectures and 3 laboratory periods per week for one 
quarter). Laboratory fee $2.50. 

A study of food emphasizing its selection and preparation, 
applying fundamental scientific principles. A unit in marketing 
will present actual problems of consumer, observation of marketing 
conditions, factors affecting price, grades, brands of food, and 
training for more intelligent buying. The unit in common foods 
and their preparation acts as a basis for further meal preparation. 

3. Foods (2 lectures, 3 laboratory periods per week for one 
quarter. Prerequisite Foods 2). Laboratory fee $2.50. 

A continuation of foods including different types of dishes used 
for specific purposes, food selection, meal planning, and table ser- 
vice. Students gain actual experience in all forms of family enter- 
taining such as family meals, buffets, teas, receptions, etc. Em- 
phasis is placed on the ability to select, plan, and prepare foods so 
that optimum meals for the family may result with a reasonable 
expenditure of time and effort and a wise use of money. 

4. Dietetics (2 lectures, 3 laboratories. One quarter. Pre- 
requisite Foods 1 and 2). Laboratory fee $2.50. 

A study of nutritive requirements of individuals and family 
groups; relative costs of foods; dietary calculations. Emphasis is 



l SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

placed on nutritive properties of foods, and on the requirement 
energy, proteins, mineral elements and vitamins. I aboratorj ap- 
plication is made to feeding of children and planning and prepara- 
tion of family dietaries. Diets for minor illnesses are planned and 
prepared. 

5 Nome Planning and Furnishing (4 lectures, 1 laboratory 
per week for one quarter) 

A study of planning and furnishing the home from the stand- 
point of family needs; modern tendencies in housing and applica- 
tion of principles of art to home furnishing; a short history oi 

architecture; location of house; study of floor plans, exteriors, 
grounds, furnishings of various rooms emphasizing heating and 
lighting and treatment of walls, floors, windows, together with se- 
lection and arrangement of furnishings. A short study of house 
care and management will be made. 

6. Family Relationships (5 lectures per week for one quarter) 

A study of factors which have made for permanency in family 
life and changing social and economic conditions which affect fam- 
ily members to each other and community; surviavls of various 
characteristics affecting family life and consideration of their worth ; 
conservation of the family and education for family life. 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

1. Freshman Physical Education (3 hours a week throughout 
the year.) Special lectures. One course through Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. 

Natural and individual gymnastics scheduled to meet individ- 
ual needs indicated by medical and physical examination and pre- 
vious physical education, including games and various group 
activities. Follow-up physical examinations, conferences, and 
health lectures. 

2. Sophomore Physical Education (3 hours a week throughout 
the year.) Special lectures. One course through Fall, Winter, and 
Spring Quarters. 

Continuation of physical education 1. A wider choice of 
activities is permitted. 



44 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Library Science 

1 A short course in the facilities and use of the library is re- 
quired of all freshmen. No credit is allowed, but the course must be 
passed before the student receives credit for work completed at the 
( !olleee. 



OF SAVANNAH 



G I ORG] \ 






FR] SI l\ll N I nroi I ID 1935 1936 



Allen. Fred ( nriss 
Mien, ( leorge 
Allen, 1 ouise 
Ashley, Leon 

B 

Battle. Joseph 

Beckett. Wit. i Honor Grad. 

S. II- .v 
Bedgood, \ Ifldred 
Beery, Edith 
Bell. Louise 
Blitch, Sarah 
Blomquist, Frances Honor Grad. 

S II S 
Bluestein, George 
Boney, Jane 
Bounds, Grace — Honor Grad. 

S. II. s, 
Bowyer. Llewellyn 
Brooks, Pape 
Bryan, Virginia 
Burns, Homer 



Caldwell, Ralph 

Cameron, Albert 

Cannon, Elton 

Cargill, Pauline 

Carr, Thomas 

Casey, James 

Cason, Lela — Honor Grad. 

Glynn Acad. 
Chan. Sin Fah — Honor Grad. 

S. II. s. 

Clark, Ursula 

Coats, Frances 

Cobb, Elizabeth — Honor Grad. 

S. H . s. 
Cohen, William 
Cole, Ernestine 
Collins, Edythc 
Cook, Charles 
Cooper, Bertram 
Cowart, Dolores 
Cronk, Jack 

D 

Dasher, Francis 
Dasher, Gordon 
Davis, John 
de Beruff, Caroline 
Dodd, Joan 
Dreese, Stockton 



I )uf< »ur, I «.lw ard 

DliPbnt, \rmaiid 

I )urani . Rui h 



Egloff, leannette 
I gl( >n . \ [argaret 

I \U \ \\ alton 



Farrar, Felton 

Flowers, ( at he ii ne 
Ford, Katherine 

1 ait re lie, Alice 



Gatch, Louise 

Gattis, James 

Geswender, Doris 

Gibson, Ann 

Givens, Louis 

Gnann, Elizabeth — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Gnann, Mary Jane 
Grantham, Mary Eleanor 

H 

Hardwick, Wendell 
Henry, Frank 
Herndon, Helene 
Hodges, De Aha 
Hoi lings worth, John 
Hood, Elizabeth 
Hough, Lloyd 
Hughes, Lucile Gorin 
Hulbcrt, Nancy 
Hull, Robert 



Ike, Martha Sue 



J 



Jeffords, Arthur — Hon&t Grad. 

S. II s. 
Jenkins. Gere— Honor Grad. 

S. II. s. 

Jenkins, Luther 

Jiran, Robert — Honor Grad. B. (' 

Johnson, Mark 

Joyner, Evelyn — Honor Grad. 

Mitchell Hi., Misenheimer, 

N.C. 



46 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



FRESHMEN ENROLLED 1935—1936 



K 

Karnibad, Nathan 
l\n \ er, Rachel 

Kronstadt . Reuben 



Lanier. Robert 

1 aughlin, Nelle 

I i Martha 

Leigh, 1 lerbert 

I .<_< in. ( leorge 

Le\ y, Elizabeth 

Lines. Alva 

Lockwood, Marilouise - Honor Grad. 

S. II. S. 
Logan, Josephine 

M 

MacFarlane, Janet 

Mann, William 

Maund, Ina 

Mayhew, Carol 

Mayhew, Louise 

McCrccry, James 

McCuen. Robert — Honor Grad. 

S. II. s. 

Mclntire, Nell 

Meadows, Carolyn — Honor Grad. 

Metier High 
Milliken, Joseph 
Moppcr, Coleman 
Morgan, Edward 
Morris. Callie 
Morrow, Marguerite 
Murphy, Eleanor 
Murphy, Hinckly 

N 

Norris, Vincent 

O 

Oast, Fannie 
Oelschig, Augusta 
Ogg, Gilbert 
Oliver, Caroline 
Oliver, Carolyn 
Olmstead, Edward 
Opper, Louise 
Ormond, Alexander 
Otto, Georgia Rose 



Paddison, Howard — Honor Grad. 

8. II. s. 
1 Theodore 

Park, Ophelia 
Persons, Alexander 
Pittman. Mildred 
Pomar, Josephine HonorGrad. 

St. Vincent' 8 A. 
Povthress, Odessa — Honor Grad. 

S II s. 

Pridgcn, Janis 
Purcell. William 
Purse, Walton 



R 



Rawlings, Margaret 

Ray, Agnes 

Reinstein, Cecil 

Rivers, Joseph 

Roberts, Vender v 

Robertson, Electa — Ho nor Grad. 

Pape School 
Robinson, David 
Rockwell, Frances 
Ross, Nairn 
Rushing, Janet 



Saminsky, Selma 
Sanders, Marion 
Sandlin, Jack — HonorGrad. 

Ways High 
Scarborough, James — HonorGrad. 

S. H.S. 
Scarborough, Mary — Honor Grad. 

S. II S. 
Schuman, Margaret 
Scott, William 
Shechan. X lary — Honor Grad. 

St. ]' ina id's Acad. 
Simpson. Fred 
Smith, Dorothy 
Smith, H. C. 

Smith, Sidney — HonorGrad. B. C. 
Snellgrove, Winifred — Honor Grad. 

S. II S 
Solvason, Elizabeth 
Speir, Lee 
Sterne, Dorothy 
Stokes, Thomas 
Straight, George 
Strobhcrt. Walter 
Summey, Thomas Austin 
Sutker, Harold 



I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

l ki g i\ii N I NROl I I n |oi5 i 



Sutkcr, Solomon HonorGrad, 

S. II. S. 



Thomas. N Ian I .eek 



Varncll, Janus 
\ ictor, Jeanne 
von ( )hscn, c Ilad> 



raylor, 1 lugh W 



Walker. Lucille 



Thompson, Madeleine Walsh, Richard HonorGrad. B. C 

Townsend, Chfistabel Ware, I loyt 

Traub, I lerbert HonorGrad. \W-itman. Ravenelle 

s // s Wilkinson, Martha Allan 

Iraub. Josephine HonorGrad. u , , ,;: • 

... ,• / ,; Wilson. Mildred 

rruchelut, Burnett Wood Margaret 

[ruchelut, 1 larry Wright, Margaret 



Clipco. 
Savannah 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



BULLETIN OF 

ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 

COLLEGE «*• 1937-1938 



k City Supported Junior College of Savannah, Georgia 




6.03. 



olume II Qs<?> Number ! 



For Reference 



tt 



tfi 



■■ 



1937-1938 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 

A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Ceorgia 




i: fii5 



"Education is a companion ivhich no misfortum can 
depress — no crime destroy — no enemy alienate — no despotism 
enslave. At home, a friend; abroad, an introduction; in 
solitude, a solace; and in society, an ornament." 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



The city of Savannah extends the privileges of Armstrong 
Junior College to those who are qualified for admission and 
desire to enrich their lives through education. Standards of 
work maintained in the College are such as to be especially 
inviting to students of good or superior ability. Students are 
expected to pursue diligently the courses of their choice and 
to be governed by the rules of propriety. 

— The Presidi nt 




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Scene from 
"The Three 
Moon," pro 
Armstrong': 
Savannah 
Playhouse. 






View of a seci 
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Library. 



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Quartet. 




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is a popular 
time activity. 



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X 




A R M STRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



CALENDAR 1937—1938 



Fall Quarter 

Explanation of courses to freshmen 

10 A. M. Auditorium September 20 

Physical Examination freshmen .... September 20 

Freshman registration September 20 

Freshman preliminary tests .... September 21-22 
Upperclassman registration and 

physical examination September 23 

Opening exercises September 24 

All classes begin September 24 

Armistice Day address November 11 

Thanksgiving holidays November 25-28 

Examinations December 16-21 

Christmas holidays .... December 22 — January 2 

Winter Quarter 

Registration January 3 

All classes begin January 4 

Annual Ball January 21 

Examinations March 15-18 

Spring holidays March 19-23 

Spring Quarter 

Registration March 23 

All classes begin March 24 

Examinations June 1-4 

President's reception June 4 

Commencement sermon June 5 

Graduation exercises June 6 



o r S A V a \ N \ 11 . 6E0RG1 A 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 

( !( in r<il Information 

Page 

College Commission 1 l 

Faculty I i 

History, Organization, and Aims L3 

Library 11 

Laboratories 15 

College Book Store 15 

Gifts to the College IB 

Dormitory Accommodations 17 

Athletic Policy 17 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 18 

Requirements for Admission 19 

Fees, Tuition, and Refunds 19 

Enrollment Procedure 20 

Testing and Guidance 21 

Student Load 22 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 22 

Explanation of Course Credit 22 

Transfers from Other Institutions 22 

Transfers to Other Institutions 23 

Reports and Grades 23 

Honor Points 23 

Honors 24 

Exchange Club Medal 24 

Co-operation with Examiner of University 

System of Georgia 24 

Final Examinations 24 

Repetition of a Course 25 

Attendance Regulations 25 

Rules on Personal Conduct 25 

Withdrawals 28 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 28 

Number Required in Courses 28 

Student Activities 28 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations ... 29 

College Organizations, Lectures, and Concerts ... 30 

All Star Concert Series 30 



10 A R .M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) 

Page 

Student Publications 30 

The Savannah Playhouse 30 

Holidays 31 

Adult Education 31 

Coutsk 8 of Study 

Certificates and Diplomas 32 

Liberal Arts 32 

Home Economics 32 

Requirements for Graduation 33 

Finance and Commerce 34 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Finance 

and Commerce 35 

Course Descriptions 

Division of Languages 37 

English 37 

Humanities 38 

Art 38 

French 39 

Spanish 39 

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics ... 40 

Biological Sciences 40 

Physical Science 41 

Mathematics 42 

Division of Social Sciences 43 

Social Sciences 43 

Political Science 44 

Economics 44 

Psychology 45 

Sociology 45 

Division of Finance and Commerce 45 

Division of Home Economics 47 

Courses in Physical Education 48 

Library Economics 48 

Students Enrolled 1936-1937 49 



() F S A \ A N N AH, G E R G 1 A 1 I 



THE COLLEGE commission 

Thomas Gamble Chairman 

Hebschel V. Jenkins Vice-Chai/rnwn 

Henri Blun, Ex officio Mrs. Mills B. Lane 

Peed G. Doyle I. A. Solomons, Jr. 

Robert m. Hitch, Ex officio Mrs. Li ci B. Trosdal 



THE FACULTY 

Ernest A. Lowe, R.S.C President 

J. Thomas Askew, Ph.R., M.A. . . . Dean 
and Instructor in Social Sciences 

WILLIAM S. Boyd, B.S., University of Georgia; M.A., Emory University. 
Instructor in Biology. 

John P. Dyer, B.A., Bryson College; M.A., Peabody College; Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University. 

Instructor in Social Sciences. 

Frances Ennis, B.S.H.E., Georgia State College for Women; M.A. in 
Household Arts Education, Columbia University. 

Instructor in Home Economics. 

Margaret Fortson, A. B., LL.B., and M.A., University of Georgia; 
Certificat, La Sorbonne, Paris. 

Instructor in English. 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B. and M.A., University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., Mercer University; M.S., Emory University. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

Charles H. Herty, Ph.B., University of Georgia; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins; 
Ch.D., University of Pittsburgh; D.Sc, Colgate; LL.D., University 
of Georgia, University of North Carolina. 

Lecturer in Chemistry and Chemurgy. 

Reuben W. Holland, A.B. and M.A., Emory University. 

Instructor in Romance Languages and Treasurer. 



L2 



A R M S T R X G JI'MOR COLLEG K 



Staci Ki:\cii. B.S. and M.A., Northwestern University. 
Instructor in English, 






ABTHUB KOLQAKLIS, B.S.C., Georgia School of Technology; M.B.A., Har- 
VBrd University. 

I list met or in Com nt< id . 



John \Y. McNeill, B.S.C., and M.A., Ohio State University. 
Instructor in Finance and Commerce. 

Dorothy HOETON Miller, A.B., Oglethorpe University; B.S. in Library 
Science, Emory University. 

Librarian. 

Ivey M. Shiver, B.S.C., University of Georgia. 

Director of Athletics and Physical Education. 

Margaret Spencer, B. Mus., Converse College; A.B., University of 
Georgia; M.A., Columbia University. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 



Nelta Beckett, Associate in Liberal Arts, Armstrong Junior College. 
Secretary. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA i 

HISTORY, ORGANIZATION, AND AIMS 

For the past few years, Savannah and the surrounding 
community have felt the need for an institution of higher 
learning. Realizing that there is an increasing number of 
young men and women who find it inconvenient or inad- 
visable to Continue their education at out-of-town colleges, 
Mayor Thomas Gamble and a group of leading citizens 
conceived the idea of establishing a junior college in 
Savannah. These men, working tirelessly over a period of 
months, finally saw their hopes become an actuality when 
on May 27, 1935, the city council authorized the establish- 
ment of a municipally supported junior college to be 
governed temporarily by a commission of fourteen members 
appointed by the mayor. The first commission was com- 
posed of the following leading Savannah citizens: Chair- 
man, A. Pratt Adams; Vice-Chairman, Thomas Gamble; 
Henry Blun, H. L. Fulton, H. M. Garwes, H. F. Gibbons, 
H. V. Jenkins, H. L. Kayton, Mrs. Mills B. Lane, A. B. 
Lovett, Frank W. Spencer, O. B. Strong, Mrs. Lucy B. 
Trosdal, Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 General 
Assembly the size of the commission was reduced to eight 
including the Mayor and Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education as exofficio members. The day before 
the ordinance creating the college was passed, Mayor 
Gamble announced that the problem of housing the new 
school was solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz and her 
daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously pre- 
sented their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. 
Armstrong, their husband and father, respectively. Due to 
the many spacious rooms, remarkably few changes were 
necessary to fit the building for college purposes. The Arm- 
strong building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, is one 
of the most beautiful college buildings in the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded 
the Lucas Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in 
founding the Junior College. In his speech of acceptance 
Mr. Gamble announced that he had received the gift of a 



14 A R M 8 T R O N G JUNIOR COLLEGE 

building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house classes in finance 
and commerce, the building to be named in honor of the 

donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings 
is the auditorium and recreation building erected and 
equipped by the city of Savannah and the federal govern- 
ment at a cost of $70,000. All three buildings, standing 
side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park 
in the city, which consists of forty acres and is used by 
Armstrong students for recreational purposes. The Georgia 
Historical Society library, to which the students have access, 
faces the park and lies just across Whitaker street from 
the College buildings. 

The Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah 
and the adjacent community by giving to the young men 
and women who attend its classes an understanding of the 
world in which they live and an appreciation of the best 
that has been achieved by western civilization. Its graduates 
are equipped to continue their studies in the junior class 
of a senior college ; but for those who do not desire to 
pursue their work elsewhere, terminal work is offered. The 
College attempts to provide its students with a keener reali- 
zation of the duties and responsibilities of citizenship and 
a broader conception of the world and its problems. 

Library 

The College library and reading rooms are located on 
the first floor of the Armstrong building. The furniture is 
walnut, finished to blend with the walnut paneled room. 
The capacity of the two reading rooms is adequate to seat 
one-fourth of the student body. 

The book collection is being carefully chosen and gives 
indication of growing rapidly. There are at present 6,000 
volumes. The collection is especially strong in biology, 
social science, and home economics material, with a fair 
representation of other subjects. The engineer's council of 
the Chamber of Commerce presented a technical library 
of several hundred volumes : this gift and others have added 
strength to various sections. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA i.. 

The reference section contains standard encyclopedias, 
dictionaries, and reference tools chosen with the needs and 
demands o( junior college students in mind. The library 
subscribes to seventy-seven magazines, many for general 
reading and some technical and professional. Subscription 
to four daily newspapers is maintained. 

In addition to the College library, the students have 

access to the Savannah Public Library and the Library of 
the Georgia Historical Society, which is one-half block from 
the Junior College. These libraries cooperate in supplying 
not only general reading matter but also books especially 
used in the courses of study. 

The aim of the library is to meet the demands of junior 
college students by providing material necessary to a more 
complete understanding of their studies and to stimulate 
their interest and enjoyment in recreational reading from 
the best of the older and modern writers. A course in the 
facilities and use of the library is required of all students. 
This provides a better understanding of books and a more 
intelligent use of the library. 

The library is under the care of a trained librarian and 
student assistants. It is open thirteen hours each day of 
the week, with the exception of Sunday, when the library 
is closed. 

Laboratories 

Laboratories for chemistry and biology form an im- 
portant part of the instructional equipment of this insti- 
tution. Both laboratories are well equipped with facilities 
for handling sections of twenty students. In addition to 
the regular laboratory in biology, class demonstrations pro- 
vide indispensable aids in the teaching of human biology. A 
museum is being established which will furnish examples 
of many marine as w r ell as inland forms of plants and 
animals. 

The College Book Store 

A book store is provided for the convenience of the 
students. Textbooks and classroom supplies are available 
at cost plus a minimum charge for handling. 



L6 A R M S T RO NG JUNIOR COL L K G K 

Gifts to the College 

No college was ever more fortunate in having good 
friends who have in so many instances satisfied needs of 
the institution through substantial gifts. This is truly a city 
college ; scores of Savannah citizens have contributed in 
some way to its establishment. 

Soon after it was known that the College would open 
in September, Mr. Boykin Paschal, president of the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, volunteered the services of that 
organization in the collection of books for the library. At 
the call of this group of progressive business and pro- 
fessional men, hundreds of Savannahians contributed books 
from their private libraries. Some two thousand volumes 
were delivered to the College by the Junior Chamber. 
Through their efforts, these gentlemen gave the College a 
collection which will be of permanent value. 

Mrs. B. F. Bullard, for many years a friend of education 
in this state, gave the College fifty volumes selected from 
her library and $200 with which to buy books and stage 
equipment. 

During the winter of 1935 Mr. Mills B. Lane, an out- 
standing Savannah citizen, purchased the home of Judge 
George T. Cann adjoining the College property, and pre- 
sented it to the Commission to be used to house classes in 
finance and commerce. This gift, with the exception of the 
gift of the original college building by Mrs. Lucy M. C. 
Moltz and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, is the 
largest that has thus far been made. 

An auditorium and class room building was built in 
1936 by the federal government and the city of Savannah 
at a cost of $70,000. It has been in use since September, 
1936. 

Two friends of the College, both desiring to remain 
anonymous, have made contributions valued at $2,000 each. 
One gift was for the purpose of making in the auditorium 
certain changes which will greatly increase the usefulness 
of the stage ; the second gift was several hundred very 
valuable and useful books. 






OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA i I 

In acknowledging Rifts, the College wishes bo express 
appreciation of the many hooks and periodicals presented 
by Mr. Thomas Gamble. Mr. Gamble is a frequent visitor 
at the College and he seldom comes without bringing one 
or more carefully selected volumes Tor the library. 

These gifts, and those of scores of other loyal friends 

whose names cannot be mentioned in the short space pro- 
vided in this bulletin, represent substantial contributions 
to the development of the College. The administration, 
faculty, and students wish to express their appreciation. 

Dormitory Accommodations 

As this catalogue goes to press the College Commission 
is making its plans for the housing of out of town students 
who will enter in September, 1937. The College does not 
own and operate its own dormitories as yet, but its govern- 
ing body has recognized its responsibility to provide such ac- 
commodations under college supervision. 

Boarding places will be selected and approved by the 
College. Every effort will be made to find desirable ac- 
commodations for Armstrong students near the Institution. 
In these student homes, attention will be given to the social 
interests as w r ell as the health and intellectual growth of 
the individual. 

This decision on the part of the College Commission 
opens the facilities of the Institution to students outside of 
Savannah at no extra cost in tuition and wall enable parents 
to place their boys and girls in college in Savannah where 
many cultural advantages are afforded. For definite cost 
parents should write the College as housing arrangements 
have not been completed at this time. 

Athletic Policy 

The administration and faculty of Armstrong Junior 
College believe that any program of education at the junior 
college level should include ample provision for training 
in physical education and a well planned system of intra- 
mural sports. Teams of Armstrong Junior College will 



18 A R M S T B N G JUNIOR COLLEGE 

engage in contests with other colleges, and a system of intra- 
mural sports will be developed. Spoils that will be em- 
phasized include football, golf, tennis, swimming, basket- 
ball, soft ball, horseback riding, and such others as student 
aptitude may indicate. It is thought that in classes in 
physical education especial emphasis should be placed on 
training in those sports which carry over into adult life. 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

Since the establishment of the College, Savannah 
citizens and organizations have been extremely generous 
in providing scholarship and loan funds for those students 
needing financial assistance. In addition to scholarships pro- 
vided locally, the National Youth Administration last year 
aided needy students to the extent of twelve percent of the 
regular enrollment of the College. This assistance has been 
extremely valuable to the College as it has been possible 
to use student talent in the several departments where help 
was needed. 

As this catalogue goes to press, it is not possible to 
determine the exact number of scholarships that will be 
open in 1937-38. The administration, therefore, advises 
students desiring aid to make application direct to the 
officers of the organizations listed below or to Professor 
Arthur Gignilliat, who is in charge of this work for the 
College. Application blanks may be obtained from Mr. 
Gignilliat. 

The organizations and individuals who have provided 
student aid through the past two years are : 

National Youth Administration 

B. H. Levy Brother and Co. 

Business & Professional Women's Club 

Federation of Women's Clubs 

Pilot Club 

Pilot's Association 

Landrum Lodge 

Friedmans' Jewelers 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA L9 

Woman's Club of Jewish Alliance 

Pan Hellenic Association 

Savannah Rotary Club 
Mrs. Joseph-Brooks Abrams 

Ii( quin ments for Admission 

A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior College 
must be a graduate of an accredited high school with fifteen 
units of credit. A general average of all high school work 
amounting to fixe points above the passing grade, when 
figures are used, or one step above passing, when letters 
are used, will be required. 

The following specific requirements must also be met: 

1. Eight constants — 3 units in English, 2 units in social 
studies, 2 units in mathematics (1 must be in 
algebra or a general mathematics course including 
algebra), and 1 unit in science. (For the year 1937- 
38 a student will be accepted without science but 
will be required to elect two additional college 
science courses in addition to the prescribed courses). 

2. Seven or eight electives — 4 of these electives must 
be from the following subjects: English, social 

studies, mathematics, science, and foreign language, 
four units may be from the vocational and avo- 
cational groups. 

Fees, Tuition, and Refunds 
Fees in Armstrong Junior College, including tuition, 
library fee, and a $5.00 student activity fee, will amount to 
a total of $105 for the year for resident and non-resident 
students alike, payable $35 upon entrance in September, 
$35 at the beginning of the second quarter in January, and 
$35 at the beginning of the third quarter in March. The 
student activity fee will include a subscription to The Ink- 
well, the College newspaper, one copy of the College 
annual, and entrance to some of the athletic contests. 

Prices for room and board will be furnished upon re- 
quest. 



20 A R M S T R N G JUNIOR COLLEG E 

Students taking science courses with laboratory work 
will be required to pay a small fee which is indicated in the 
description of the science courses found under "Courses of 
Instruction" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Fall - - $35.00 Tuition, and fees 
Winter - $35.00 Tuition and fees 
Spring - $35.00 Tuition and fees 



$105.00 Total 

Laboratory fees additional. 

Special students will be admitted only by permission of 
the Dean. For less than three courses in any one quarter 
the charge will be $15.00 for each course. 

A late registration fee of $5.00 will be charged any 
student who fails to register and pay tuition fees on the day 
designed for registration at the beginning of each quarter, 
unless excused because of sickness. 

In afternoon and evening classes a fee of $8.00 will be 
charged for one-half course, $15.00 for one course, $20.00 
for one and one-half courses, and $25.00 for two courses, 
the maximum number of evening courses allowed for any 
one quarter. This rate applies to the courses taken within 
one quarter only. A course includes three eighty-five 
minute lecture periods each week. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a 
quarter will receive a refund of one-half of the tuition fee. 
No refunds will be made after the first thirty days of a 
term, and no refunds will be made to those dismissed from 
College. 

Enrollment Procedure 

Schedule of physical examinations for all first year 
students will be arranged September 20, and registration 
of freshmen will be completed on September 20. No student 
will be permitted to register unless a transcript showing 
all high school credit earned is in the hands of the Dean. 
Considerable delay and perhaps expense may be avoided 
by attending to this matter at least one month before school 
opens. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 21 

Any freshman permitted to register after September 20 
will be charged a late registration fee of (5.00. 

All freshmen applicants must register in person and 
follow this procedure : 

1. Introduction of members of the faculty and ex- 
planation of courses at l<> A. M., September 20, in 
the College Auditorium. 

2. Physical examinations will be scheduled between 
the hours of 11 A. M. and 1 P. M., September 2<>. 

3. Registration in the library rooms, September 20. 

4. Payment of all fees in the Treasurer's office, Septem- 
ber 20. This may be done any time between the 
hours of 11:00 and 5:00. 

5. Thursday and Friday, September 21 and 22 will be 
devoted to four preliminary tests, two each day, 
which will be required of all freshmen without any 
exceptions. Tests are scheduled to begin at 9 :00 
A. M. and 3:00 P. M. 

Registration, payment of fees, and schedule for physical 
examination of upperclassmen will be completed on Septem- 
ber 23. Any upperclassman permitted to register or pay 
fees after that date will be charged a late registration fee 
of $5.00. 

Testing and Guidance 

The College feels that it can render a most important 
service to the student by helping him find that vocation or 
profession where he can realize the most satisfaction and 
success in life. With this in mind a committee of testing 
and guidance has been set up through which the student 
may receive sound advice on his personal and vocational 
problems. This committee studies the individual student and 
tries to discover his aptitudes and abilities. The information 
thus obtained is utilized by the entire faculty. 

In order that the College may have the necessary in- 
formation upon which to build a satisfactory guidance 
program, all students are required to take a series of tests 
before entrance requirements are fulfilled and registration 



22 A R M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

completed. All students are required to take a physical 
examination which is administered by the College in con- 
junction with the City Health Department. A student who 
can not take the examination at the appointed time will 
be given an examination at a later date and charged a fee 
of two dollars. The physical condition of each student is 
studied, and recommendations made where such are neces- 
sary. 

Student Load 

A normal load is three and one-third courses each 
quarter, and students will be required to carry this amount 
of work unless special arrangements are made with the 
Dean. A student must pass nine courses before he w r ill 
be ranked as a sophomore. 

Students who make two A's and have no grades below 
B for any one quarter may carry an additional course or a 
maximum of four and one-third courses for the subsequent 
auarter. 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 

Permission of the Dean is necessary to drop a subject 
or to transfer from one subject or section to another. 

Explanation of Course Credit 
The school year lasts nine months and is divided into 
three quarters, Fall, Winter, and Spring. A course includes 
five fifty-five minute lecture periods per week for one 
quarter. 

Transfers from other Institutions 

No student will be accepted from another college with- 
out a transcript of college work from that institution, and 
no student may enroll in Armstrong Junior College who has 
been dropped from another institution or who is on pro- 
bation from another institution because of poor scholarship. 

A student transferring to Armstrong Junior College will 
have his credits reduced unless at least three-fourths of 
all grades received at another college are above the lowest 
passing grade of that college. 






OF S A \ \ \ \ \ 1 1 . GEORG1 \ 

T i'<i iisfi rs to othi r Institutions 

So student will be recommended for transfer to other 
institutions unless three-fourths of all grades received arc 
above D. 

R< ports end Grades 

Reports for every college student will be sent by the 
Dean to the parent or guardian at the end of each quarter. 
The reports are based upon the following system of 

marking : 

Grade A plus, Exceptional 1 honor points per 

course 
Grade A, Superior 3 honor points per 

course 
Grade B, Better than average 2 honor points per 

course 
Grade C, Average 1 honor point per 

course 
Grade D, Barely passing honor points per 

course 
Grade E, Incomplete Minus 1 honor point 

per course 
Grade F, Failure Minus 1 honor point 

per course 

Grade E (Incomplete) — An incomplete may be removed 
by means stipulated by the instructor of the course in which 
the student received the grade E. An E not removed in 
the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an F. 

Honor Points 

The number of honor points a student receives is deter- 
mined by the grades he makes, each grade carrying a 
certain number of honor points, as explained above. In 
order to graduate, a student must receive as many honor 
points, based upon the above grading system, as the num- 
ber of courses required for graduation, and as many honor 
points as courses taken by the student. 



24 A li MSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Honors 

Students who maintain an average of B or above in 
each course during a quarter's work will be placed on the 
Dean's Scholastic Attainment List. At the discretion of the 
Dean, special absence privileges may be granted to these 
students. 

The 20?? of each class who have the highest averages, 
and have failed no courses, will be given special recognition 
on Honors Day. 

Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction) will be 
bestowed upon those receiving an average of 3 honor points 
per course. 

A valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class 
from among the five students with the highest scholastic 
average. 

All students who receive recognition on Honors Day 
will have their names recorded on a permanent Dean's List 
in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. 

Exchange Club Medal 

The Exchange Club of the city of Savannah presents 
an expensive medallion to the student who makes the 
highest grade in the course on Contemporary Georgia. 

Cooperation with the Examiner of the 
University System of Georgia 

The University System of Georgia has inaugurated in 
certain courses a uniform examination plan under the super- 
vision of a trained technician. A number of these courses 
are offered by Armstrong Junior College. With the per- 
mission of the Examiner and the administration of the 
University System of Georgia, Armstrong has been per- 
mitted to cooperate in this testing program. 

Final Examinations 

1. Regular written examinations are required in all 
courses at the end of each quarter. These examinations are 



. 



o P S \ \ \ \ \ \ ii . GE0RG1 \ 26 

held on the last three or four days of the Quarter, in ac- 
cordance with a permanent schedule. 

2. Final examinations, except in laboratory practice, 

are limited bo a period of three hours, in courses in which 
a considerable portion of the examination is of a practical 

nature, the instructor may extend the time at his discretion. 

3. Special examinations for students who have been 
officially excused from regular examinations may be held 
at suitable times fixed by the instructors concerned. Such 
examinations must be taken within the succeeding quarter, 
and a fee of $1.00 will be assessed for each examination. 

Repetition of a Course 

A student who fails in not more than one course during 
a quarter may repeat the same subject in addition to carry- 
ing a normal load of three and one-third courses in a sub- 
sequent quarter if work is generally satisfactory. Per- 
mission of the Dean is necessary and a fee of $5.00 will be 
charged. 

Attendance Regulations 

Students are allowed three unexcused absences per 
course. Excess absences must be satisfactorily explained to 
the instructor in charge of the course or to the Dean, if class 
work is to continue. Special faculty action will be required 
before a student may receive credit on a course from which 
he has been absent eight or more times. 

Upon request, special absence privileges may be granted 
a student who is on the Dean's List, but the granting of such 
privileges is within the discretion of the Dean. 

A student who is absent from any class two days be- 
fore or after a holiday or the beginning or ending of a term 
will be assessed $1.00 for each day or part of a day absent. 

Rules on Personal Conduct 

Students are requested to maintain high standards of 
personal conduct and character. 



ARMSTRONG CQUEQEj 
LIBRARV 




Stuc£e?zt A 




■A -1936-37 



a R M S T BONG J r N IOR college 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal is a prerequisite to honorable dis- 
missal or re-entrance to this institution. Any student plan- 
ning to withdraw must immediately make such intentions 
known to the President. 

Dismissals and P< rmission to Re-regisU r 

All students failing (except in cases excused before 
examinations on account of sickness) to pass at least one 
course other than physical education in any one quarter 
will be dropped from the rolls of the College. All students 
who fail to make an average of at least five honor points 
during the first three quarters' work at the Junior College 
will not be allowed to re-register. 

Number Required in Courses 

Unless at least fifteen students register for the course 
no course will be given without special action of the Dean. 

Student Activities 

Believing that self-discipline by the individual student 
has educational value, the faculty has endeavored to create 
an atmosphere of freedom around the College. The students 
have been free to form scholarly habits, to develop indi- 
vidual abilities and to practice self-restraint in a manner 
becoming adults. In keeping with this policy, which has 
been very successful so far, the faculty will place the same 
responsibilities upon and give the same freedom to in- 
coming freshmen. The faculty is unalterably opposed to 
hazing in any form. 

The College faculty and students will hold a series of 
closed dances throughout the year. 

The President and faculty will provide regulations for 
student organizations. Any student group desiring to hold 
any public meeting or social event in the name of the 
College or in the name of the student organizations must 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORG1 A 

notify the Committee on Student Activities two weeks in ad- 
vance of the meeting and find a place on the calendar kepi 
in the President's office. 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations 

1. Any group of students desiring to organize a social 
club must submit to the Faculty Committee on Student Ac- 
tivities a petition for a charter. This petition should contain 
the following- information: 

(1) Name of the proposed organization 

(2) Aims and purposes of the organization 

(3) Proposed regulations governing membership, 
initiation, and dues 

(4) Plan of organization 

(5) Proposed time and place of meeting 

(6) Name of proposed sponsor 

(7) Names of proposed members. 

2. No student may become a member of any social 
organization unless he or she has earned at least four honor 
points in the quarter preceding initiation. A student who 
has not earned the required number of honor points may, 
however, be pledged as a prospective member but may not 
enjoy full privileges of membership until after formal 
initiation. 

3. No student shall be pledged as a prospective mem- 
ber of any social organization before the end of the third 
week of his or her first quarter at Armstrong. 

4. All invitations to membership should be in writing. 
The invitation should be accepted or declined, in writing, 
within three days of the date upon which it is received. 
The reply to the invitation should be addressed to the 
Chairman of the Faculty Committee on Student Activities 
who will notify the organization and keep the replies on 
file. 

5. Any student organization desiring to give an enter- 
tainment shall notify the Chairman of the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Student Activities of such proposed entertainment 



80 \ i: M S T R N G .1 U N I R C L L E G E 

at least two weeks in advance, stating, in writing, the nature 
of the entertainment, the time and place, and the chaperons 

to be invited. 

(>. The sponsor of a social organization should not he 
a member of the faculty of the college. 

College Organizations, Lectures, and Cona rte 
The College sponsors a glee club, an orchestra, a literary 
society, and dramatics. During the year these organizations 
present programs at student assemblies and, occasionally, 
to the public. All students showing ability and interest are 
eligible for membership in these organizations. 

Students of Armstrong are provided unusual opportuni- 
ties to hear some of the best lecturers in America as well as 
concert artists of ability. Through a special arrangement 
with the Savannah Community Forum, students of the 
College are permitted to attend six lectures during the fall 
and winter for the small fee of $1.00. These lectures are 
given in the college auditorium. Last year, among others, 
the students heard General Smedley Butler, Kirtley F. 
Mather, Gaetano Salvemini, Stuart Chase, and Henry Seidel 
Canby. 

All Star Concert Series 

Through a similar arrangement with the management 
of the All Star Concert Series, students are admitted to these 
concerts at a greatly reduced price. Last year artists in- 
cluded in the series were Lawrence Tibbett, Sergei Rach- 
maninoff, Gladys Swarthout, Nino Martini, Albert Spalding, 
and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. 

Student Publications 

The official organ of the student body is the Inkwell and 
is published once a month. The Geechee is the College year 
book. 

The Savannah Playhouse 

The Savannah Playhouse of Armstrong Junior College 
was founded in 1936 for the purpose of emphasizing the 






OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 81 

study of Bpeech and of Berving the student body and com- 
munity in the field of the drama and its allied arts. The 
playhouse thus provides opportunity for one to enrich his 
background in the drama and to participate in stage pro- 
ductions. 

Students desiring to do SO may study such subjects as 
History of the Theatre, Stage Lighting, Stagecraft, Stage 
Costuming, Scene Designing, and Acting. These courses 
are fully described under English 5 and 6 in the section 
entitled "Course Descriptions/' page 37. 

It is the aim of this theatre to produce from time to 
time various forms of the drama which are worthy of the 
experimental theatre. 

Student experience in the many phases of the work of 
the Playhouse not only constitutes foundation work for ad- 
vanced study in the field, but develops a confidence in one's 
ability to think and speak correctly. The College speech 
courses have had comparatively heavy registration from 
the beginning. Students taking these courses are given an 
opportunity to assist in the development of the theatre. 

Holidays 

The College calendar provides for holidays only at 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and in the Spring. One additional 
holiday will be granted when the faculty attends the meet- 
ing of the Georgia Education Association. Although the 
school will not suspend classes for other occasions, students 
desiring to recognize religious holidays are urged to do so, 
and a limited number of absences is allowed for such 
occasions. 

Adult Education 

The College will offer afternoon or evening classes for 
adults. The same number of hours will be spent in these 
classes as is spent in those on the regular schedule. The fee 
will be $15 per course. No course will be given for fewer 
than ten students. 



32 A R M STRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Certificates and Diplomas 
The College will offer work leading to three different 
certificates: Associate in Liberal Arts, Associate in Home 
Economics, and Associate in Finance and Commerce. 

Liberal Arts 
The Liberal Arts course is designed for those students 
who desire a broad educational background; it is concerned 
with man and with [he achievements of civilization. The 
course deals with man's natural, social, and cultural history 
and seeks to give the student an understanding of the past 
and its relationship to the present. 

When he has completed the course, the student is ex- 
pected to have some knowledge of the fundamental princi- 
ples of natural science, of the great movements which have 
directed the course of civilization, and of the artistic and 
literary masterpieces of the world. The student is then 
ready to specialize in any field he chooses — natural or social 
science, literature, art, or any other subject which appeals 
to him. If, however, the student does not expect to continue 
his education further in college, he is ready to go into his 
life's work better able to understand and to see in their 
proper relationships the problems of life and of society, and 
to appreciate more fully man's achievements and aspir- 
ations. 

By a proper selection of electives, liberal arts students 
may prepare themselves for the technical and professional 
courses in senior colleges. Correspondence with the senior 
college concerned should be undertaken by the student in 
planning such a course of study. 

Home Economics 
h\ view of the fact that an appreciation of the problems 
of home making is desirable for all young women whether 
they continue work at a senior college or not, the Home 
Economics course at Armstrong Junior College is designed 
to help the greatest number, and, at the same time, satisfy 






OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

the requirements of the senior college for those who wish 
to major in home economics. The work beyond the general 
core courses will be taken in the field of home economics 
and closely related subjects. 

With the exception of Dietetics and the course in meal 

planning and table Service, home economics courses have 

been planned without prerequisite so that any of these may 

become an elective lor a student who does not wish to major 
in home economics. This flexibility, it is hoped, will enable 
many students not specializing in home economics to take 
courses in this field. 

The four courses selected in home economics are those 
that will give a broad training, fit the girls for home making, 
other vocations, and give them a richer life. 

The home economics clothing laboratory is well 
equipped. The foods laboratory has five home kitchens and 
an attractive serving unit. 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. All students are required to complete the following 

courses: 

Social Science . . 1,2, 3 or 2, 3, 12 . . 3 courses 

Biology 2 courses 

Humanities . . . 1, 2, (or 2 courses 

in English) . . 2 courses 

English .... 1 or 2 1 course 

Mathematics . . 1, 2, or 3 . . . . 1 course 

Physical Education 2 courses 

Total specified 11 courses 

Electives and specified 9 

Total for graduation 20 courses 

2. At least two college courses in a foreign language 
will be required of all students pursuing the course leading 
to an Associate in Liberal Arts certificate. Additional 
language courses will be required of students who wish to 
prepare for senior colleges requiring more than two college 
courses in language. 



8 1 A R M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

3. Not more than ten courses will be accepted from 
another institution toward the completion of work on a 
certificate, and all transfer students must remain in 
residence for nine consecutive months, regardless of the 
number of credits received elsewhere. Under all circum- 
stances the student must attend the Junior College during 
the last quarter when work is completed on a certificate. 

4. In order to graduate it is necessary that the candi- 
date have to his credit as many honor points as the number 
of courses required for graduation, and as many honor 
points as courses completed. (For explanation of honor 
points see "Honor Points," page 23). 

5. A student transferring to Armstrong Junior College 
will have his credits reduced if more than one-fourth of all 
grades received at another college are the lowest passing 
grade in that college. 

6. Three courses in Home Economics (clothing, foods 
and one elective), one course in Art, and two courses in 
Inorganic Chemistry, will be required of all students pur- 
suing the course leading to an Associate in Home Economics 
certificate. 

7. For requirements in the course in Finance and Com- 
merce see page 35. 

8. Library Science. A brief course in the use of books 
and libraries is required of all first-year students during 
the first quarter. This course is designed to introduce the 
student to the use of books and the resources of the library. 
The lesson plan is based on the history of libraries and 
printing, the card catalog, encyclopediae, dictionaries, 
general reference tools, and the making of bibliographies. 
This is a non-credit course. 

Finance and Comnu ret 

The Junior College offers a three-year course leading to 
an Associate in Finance and Commerce diploma. The 
entrance requirements are the same as for other courses 
offered in Armstrong Junior College. 



OP SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

The course of study thai has been devised ia expected 

to aid the student in understanding himself and society, 
to Rive him some knowledge of the way the world of finance, 
industry, and trade operates, and to provide some training 
in the techniques of business. Before graduation the student 
will be required to pass a test in shorthand and typing and 
to be able to operate certain specified mechanical equipment 
now found in the more efficient business establishments. 

The three-year course of study outlined below has been 
constructed to meet the needs of those who will participate 
in the life of the business community, remembering that 
Savannah is an important sea port and financial center. 
As the work is of a terminal nature, i. e., a complete course 
within itself which gives technical training in a specified 
field, only those students who wish to complete their work 
at the Junior College will be advised to take this course. 
If any student desires a four-year course in finance and 
commerce, he should pursue liberal arts at the Junior 
College with electives in economics, psychology, and ac- 
counting, and transfer to a senior college after two years 
at Armstrong. 

By meeting all liberal arts requirements a commerce 
student may receive a certificate in liberal arts at the end 
of the second year; one additional year's work will be re- 
quired for the diploma in finance and commerce. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 

Finance and Commerce 

First Year 

Social Science ... 2, 3 2 courses 

Human Biology . . . 11, 12 .... 2 courses 

Commerce .... 1 1 course 

Economics ....21 1 course 

English 1 or 2 .... 1 course 

Mathematics . . . 1 or 2 and 14 . 2 courses 

Physical Education 1 course 



10 courses 



A K M S I RONG JUNIOR C O LLE (i E 

Second and Third Years 

Accounting . 1 and 2 2 courses 

American Government and Politics or Social 

Science .1 1 course 

Business Law 2 courses 

Business Finance 1 course 

Economics 22 1 course 

Humanities . 1 and 2 (or 2 courses 

in English) . 2 courses 

Investments 1 course 

Insurance . 10 or Marketing . 6 . . 1 course 

Marketing 1 course 

Money and Banking 1 course 

Physical Education 1 course 

Psychology 1 course 

15 courses 
Electives 4 

19 courses 



DP SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 37 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
DIVISION OF LANGUAGES 

English 

1. Grammar and Composition 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A review of punctuation and the fundamentals of gram- 
mar. Essays are read and discussed and themes are written 
weekly. Several novels are read out of class and reported 
on at stated intervals. The course attempts to teach the 
student to understand what he reads, to acquire a larger 
and more complete vocabulary, and to be able to organize 
and express his thoughts orally and in writing. 

2. Introduction to Literature 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of literature by types, this course includes the 
reading and discussion of representative essays, short 
stories, plays, and poems of the most outstanding English 
and American authors of the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Five or more novels will be used for collateral 
reading. 

3. Business Writing Practice 

5 hours a w r eek for one quarter. 

4. Introduction to Poetry 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course deals with the history of English poetry, a 
study of the various types and forms, and a reading and 
understanding of representative works from the leading 
English and American poets. 

5. Play Production 

5 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory work per week 
for one quarter. 

This course includes a fundamental study of production 
methods with emphasis upon the technical aspects of pro- 
ducing plays in the modern theatre, such as : the physical 



38 A R M S T R O N G JUNIOR COLLEGE 

theatre, brief history of the physical development of the 
theatre, stage craft, construction of settings, stage lighting, 
stage costuming, and stage make-up. Each member of the 
production class will be required to work on a minimum 
of one crew during the term. 

6. Play Production (Prerequisite English 5) 
5 hours lecture per week for one quarter. 

This course is an advanced production course in the 
study of play directing and acting, devoted both to the his- 
torical and contemporary theatre. 

7. Public Speaking 

5 hours classroom work per w r eek for one quarter. 

A fundamental course designed to develop the public 
speaker. Emphasis is placed upon platform delivery and 
elements governing effective speaking in audience relation- 
ship. 

Humanities 

1-2. Humanities 

5 hours lecture per week for two quarters. Re- 
quired of all students planning to attend the Uni- 
versity System. 

A survey of the cultural achievements of Western Civili- 
zation. The course seeks to give the student a general under- 
standing of the leading intellectual and esthetic movements 
of Western Europe and an acquaintance with the greatest 
literary figures from Homer to Galsworthy. Painting, sculp- 
ture, and architecture are considered. 

Art 

11. Art Principles and Design 

2 lectures and 8 hours laboratory work per week 
for one quarter. Fee $2.50. 

A study of fundamental principles underlying all art. 
Laboratory work in the use of line, mass, and color. Intro- 
duction to color theory and lettering. 



OF SAVANNAH, GE0R61 A 8« 

Fn nrh 

\-*l. Elementary French 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

The elements of French grammar are studied with a 
view to early reading. Some 150 pages of classroom and 
collateral readings are completed. Attention is given to 
pronunciation, composition, and conversation. 

No credit will be allowed until French 2 is completed. 

3. Intermediate French 

5 hours per week for one quarter. 

Review grammar with continued stress on composition 
and oral practice. Reading of 400 pages of standard texts. 

4. Nineteenth Century French Prose 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A survey of the prose writings of the nineteenth century. 
Reading and discussion of 500 pages from representative 
writers. Reports on collateral reading. 

5. French Classical Drama 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Representative plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 
Four plays to be read in class and four plays to be read as 
collateral. 

6. French Short Stories 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the short story in France. 

Spanish 

3. Intermediate Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A review of Spanish grammar with extensive oral prac- 
tice. Reading of selected texts from nineteenth century 
prose writers. 

4. Teatro espanol 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



1" ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

A study of Spanish drama with particular emphasis on 
contemporary authors. 

5. Commercial Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of business methods in Spanish America to- 
gether with the writing of business letters in Spanish. Ex- 
tensive practice. 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
AND MATHEMATICS 

Biological Sciences 

3. Invertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

A study of invertebrate animals including local fresh 
water and marine forms. 

4. General Vertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 
11-12) 

4 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

An intensive study of the vertebrate group including 
laboratory dissection of several types. The study will in- 
clude the kinds of vertebrates and their distribution in time 
and space, vertebrate embryology, and details of the 
various vertebrate organ systems. Biology of The Vertebrates, 
by Walter, is the text used. 

5. General Botany (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 
3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

A general survey of the plant kingdom with particular 
emphasis on the identification and study of local forms. 
This course sets forth the important facts and interpreta- 
tions with which botanical science is concerned. 

11-12. Human Biology 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Required of 
all students planning to attend the University 
System of Georgia. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA n 

This course Is designed to give t li r student an under- 
standing of genera] biological principles, particularly as 
applied to the human organism. The first half of the course 
includes a study of fundamental facts of biology, human 

anatomy, and physiology. The Second half Of the course 
includes studies in problems Of public health, reproduction, 
and the principles of genetics, evolution, and eugenics. 

Physical Sciences 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

1 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit 
$2.50. 

The first course is a study of the preparation, properties, 
and uses of a number of the non-metallic elements and their 
compounds. The fundamental laws of elementary inorganic 
chemistry are stressed. 

The second course is a continuation of Chemistry 1, and 
includes the preparation, properties, and uses of the more 
common metallic elements and their compounds. The 
laboratory work will offer several experiments which will 
serve as an introduction to qualitative and quantitative 
analysis. 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 1-2) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit $2.50. 

The text used is by Louis J. Curtman. The lectures will 
deal with the theoretical aspects of the subject with special 
reference to the application of the law of mass action. The 
laboratory w T ork will consist of a study of the reactions, 
precipitations, and detections of the principal metals and 
acid radicals. 

21-22. General Physics (not offered 1936-37) 

4 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory work per 
week for two quarters. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Deposit $2.50. 



42 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

This course is a study of the properties of matter, 
mechanics of solids, mechanics of fluids and heat, sound, 
light, and electricity. 

11-12. Physical Science 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Required of 
all students planning to attend the University 
System of Georgia. 
This course is a survey of the Physical Sciences. The 
subject matter is taken from the fields of physics, chemistry, 
astronomy, geology, and geography. In general, the objec- 
tives of the course are : to make one more familiar with the 
physical phenomena of our environment; to develop an ap- 
preciation of the scientific method ; and to furnish a cultural 
and general informational background which may be used 
as a foundation for future work by those students whose 
interests may lie in the fields of Physical Science. 

Mathematics 

1. A survey of Mathematics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
The subject matter stressed in this course is of a utili- 
tarian and cultural nature. Work in finance and statistics 
is included with a study of the fundamentals of algebra and 
trigonometry. The introduction traces the history of our 
system of computation, showing the role mathematics has 
played in our social development. 

2. College Algebra 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of quadratics; ratio, proportion, and variation; 
the binomial theorem; complex numbers; theory of 
equations; determinants; logarithms and the slide-rule; and 
permutations, combinations, and probability. 

3. Trigonometry 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Plane and spherical trigonometry. 

4. Analytic Geometry (Prerequisite Mathematics 2 
and 3) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 









o F S A V \ \ \ A 11 , G E R G I A 

An introductory course dealing with such topics as co- 
ordinate systems, transformations, loci and their equations, 
the straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, and 
the geometric interpretation of the general equation of the 

second degree : also polar coordinates and analytic geometry 
of three dimensions. 

11. Elements of statistics (Prerequisite Mathematics 
1 or 2) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The collection, classification, and presentation of nu- 
merical data. 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Social Sciences 

1. The Foundations of Western Civilization 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The political, economic, and social movements of ancient 
and medieval times are studied with particular emphasis 
placed on the movements sometimes called the Renaissance. 
Roman law, Christianity, the Medieval Church, expansion 
of Europe, the intellectual quickening, religious upheaval, 
national monarchies, and mercantilism are given special 
attention. 

2. The Progress of Western Civilization through the 
Industrial Revolution (1660-1870) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The parliamentary system of England, absolutism, Vol- 
taire, the French Revolution, the rise of capitalism, the In- 
dustrial Revolution, socialism, nationalism, the rise of the 
United States, the influence of the American frontier, and 
the scientific and social progress of the 19th century are 
surveyed. 

3. The Contemporary World (1870-1937) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Industrialization of the nations, imperialism, causes of 
the World War, post-war nationalism, movements toward 
economic self-sufficiency, dictatorships, the New Deal, move- 



44 A R MSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

merits for world peace, and scientific and social progress 
of the 20th century are surveyed. 

1. Contemporary Georgia 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Required of all 
students planning to attend the University System 
of Georgia. 
The economic, social, and political problems of Georgia 
are studied with particular emphasis on regional and nation- 
al problems which impinge, either directly or indirectly, on 
our state. Human and natural resources, the conditions of 
agriculture and industry, and problems of state and local 
governments are surveyed. 

Political Science 

12. American Government and Politics 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Principal emphasis is placed upon principles, processes, 
and problems, with some attention given to political de- 
velopments under the Xew Deal. 

13. State and Local Government (Prerequisite Social 
Science 12) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A course dealing with machinery and problems of local 
government. 

14. The Governments of Europe (Prerequisite 2 courses 
in Social Science) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
Particular emphasis is placed on the political machinery 
and problems of England, France, Italy, Germany, and 
Russia. European governmental methods that differ from 
our own will be given special attention. 

Economics 
21. Introductory Economics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A course which introduces the student to economic con- 
cepts and principles with due attention to modern economic 
institutions and problems. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 16 

'Jii. World Resources and Industry 
•") hours a w eek for one quarter. 

Psychology 

8 l . Introductory Psychology 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

An introduction to the scientific study of mental life, 

Sociology 
60. Family Relationships 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of factors which have made for permanency in 
family life; changing social and economic conditions which 
affect family members in their relations with each other 
and the community ; survivals of various characteristics 
affecting family life and consideration of their worth ; con- 
servation of the family and education for family life. 

DIVISION OF FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

1. Introduction to Business Organization (Prerequisite 
to all commerce courses) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course and mathematics 1 are prerequisite to all other 
commerce courses. Commerce 1 is designed to introduce 
students to the field of business organization and manage- 
ment. A description of the structure and functions of 
modern business is presented and an insight given into the 
fields or divisions of business. Careful attention is given to 
a study of the importance and scope of each field and its 
relation to the other fields of work emphasized. 

2-3. Accounting 

3 lectures and 4 laboratory periods a week for two 
quarters. 

Principles of single proprietorship, partnership, and 
corporation accounting; the balance sheet, profit and loss 
statements, and the theory of debits and credits. In course 
3 intermediate accounting will be covered. 



46 A R M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

4. Accounting Problems 

5. Marketing 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A general critical survey of the field of marketing and 
consumer demand in relation to the marketing machinery. 
Functions, methods, policies, marketing costs, and the 
problems of the farmer, manufacturer, wholesaler, com- 
mission merchant, broker, retailer, and other middlemen. 
Emphasis on principles, trends, and policies in relation to 
marketing efficiency. 

6. Marketing (Prerequisite Marketing 5) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Special attention is given means, methods, and problems 
relating to wholesaling and retailing. Advertising, store 
location, store organization, buying, receiving, stock-keep- 
ing, inventories, sales systems, and planning, store policies, 
services, deliveries, expenses and profits, personnel prob- 
lems, and credit problems receive special attention. 

7. Money and Banking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the principles, functions, and forms of money 
and credit; analysis of money and credit problems; theory 
of money and banking; and banking practices. 

8. Business Finance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of business financial organization with special 
attention to the corporation; management of capital; prob- 
lems of financial administration and securities; analysis of 
causes of failures. 

9. Investments 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of capital markets and their place in the busi- 
ness world. Investment finance and investment markets 
are studied from the technical, personal, and public aspect. 
Special attention is given the elements determining the value 
of different forms of investment. 









OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 47 

lo. Insurance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of life, fire, health, and accident insurance; 
employer's liability, title and credit insurance; and insur- 
ance and bonding companies. 

1 1-12. Business Law 

•~) hours a week for two quarters. 

A brief study of law from the business man's standpoint 
dealing with such subjects as contracts, wills, sales, negoti- 
able instruments. Attention is given to the historic and 
economic development of certain principles of commercial 
usage. Where Georgia statutes and practices are at variance 
with those of other states, the Georgia rules are emphasized. 

14. Elements of Statistics (Prerequisite Mathematics 
1 or 2) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The collection, classification, presentation and analysis 
of statistical data. 

DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Clothing 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory per week for one 
quarter. 

This course is designed to establish appreciations, inter- 
ests, habits, and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, 
design, construction, and care of clothing. Problems are 
provided so that students gain actual experience in ap- 
plication of these fundamental principles. The clothing 
budget is studied as an aid in obtaining the greatest satis- 
faction from the money spent for clothing. 

2. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory per week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A study of food emphasizing its selection and prepara- 
tion, applying fundamental scientific principles. A unit in 
marketing will present actual problems of consumer, ob- 
servation of marketing conditions, factors affecting price, 



18 A R M S T R o X G J U N I R C L L E G E 

grades, brands of* (nod, and training for more intelligent 
buying. The unit in common foods and their preparation 
acts as a basis for further meal preparation. Students gain 
actual experience in all forms of family entertaining such 
as family meals, buiFets, teas, receptions. 

3. Foods (not offered 1937-38) 

.">. Home Planning and Furnishing 

4 lectures, 2 hours laboratory per week for one 
quarter. 

A study of planning and furnishing the home from the 
standpoint of family needs; modern tendencies in housing 
and application of principles of art to home furnishing; a 
short history of architecture ; location of house ; study of 
floor plans, exteriors, grounds, furnishings of various rooms 
emphasizing heating and lighting and treatment of walls, 
floors, windows, together with selection and arrangement 
of furnishings. A short study of house care and manage- 
ment will be made. 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
LIBRARY ECONOMICS 

1. Freshman Physical Education 

3 hours lecture a week throughout the year. 
One course, special lectures. Games and various group 
activities to meet individual needs indicated by medical and 
physical examination and previous physical education. 
Follow-up physical examinations, conferences, and health 
lectures. 

2. Sophomore Physical Education 

3 hours lecture a week throughout the year. 
One course, special lectures. Continuation of Physical 
Education 1. A wider choice of activities is permitted. 

Library Economics 
1. A short course in the facilities and use of the library 
is required of all freshmen. No credit is allowed, but the 
course must be passed before the student receives credit 
for work completed at the College. 



o !• 



S V \ A \ \ A II 



G E o R G I A 



Ifl 



SOPHOMORES ENROLLED 1936 L93' 



B 

Beckett, Nelta Honor Grad. 

s. //. >\ 

Beery, Edith 
Blackwell, Virginia 

Blomquist, Prances Honor Grad. 

S. U.S. 

Bond, Will 

Bound8, Grace -Honor (!r<i<l. 

S. H. S. 
Bowyer, H. L. 
Brooks, Pape 
Bryan, Virginia 

C 

Cargill, Pauline 

parr, Thomas 

Cason, Lela — Honor Grad. 
Glynn Acad. — Brunswick 

Khan, Sin Fah — Honor Grad. 
S. H. S. 

Clark, Ursula 

Coats, Frances 

Cobb, Elizabeth — Honor Grad, 
S. H. S. 

Collins, Edythe 

Cooper, Bertram 

Cowart, Dolores 



Dreese, Stockton 
Durant, Ruth 

E 

Egloff, Margaret 
Ex ley, Walton 

G 

Gatch, Louise 

Gibson, Ann 

Gnann, Elizabeth — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Gnann, Mary Jane — Honor Grad. 

Springfield, Ga. 
Grantham, Mary E. 



II 

Hardwick, Wendell 
Henry, Prank 
Heriot, Robert 
Herndon, Helene 
Hodge, .John 
Hodges, De Aha 
Hood, Elizabeth 

Hull, Robert 



Jeffords, Arthur — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Johnson, Mark 

K 

Karnibad, Nathan 
Keever, Rachel 
Kronstadt, Reuben 



Lanier, Robert 

Laughlin, Nelle 

Lee, Martha 

Leon, George 

Levy, Elizabeth 

Lines, Alva 

Lockwood, Marilouise — Honor 

Grad.—S. H. S. 
Logan, Josephine 

M 

McCreery, James 

McCuen, Robert — Ho/tor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Mclntire, Nell 
McTyre, Calista 
Mann, William 
Mayhew, Carol 
Mayhew, Louise 
Meadows, Carolyn — Honor Grad. 

Metter H. S. 
Mopper, Coleman 
Morgan, Edward 
Morris, Callie 
Morrow, Marguerite 



50 



A R M STRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



SOPHOMORES ENROLLED 193K L937 (Continued) 



Murphy, Eleanor 
Murphy, Hinckly 

N 
Norton, Elizabeth 

O 

Oast, Fannie 
Oelschig, Augusta 
Oliver, Caroline 
Oliver, Carolyn 
Opper, Louise 
Otto, Georgia Rose 



Padgett, Joan 

Park, Ophelia 

Persons, Alex 

Pittman, Mildred 

Poythress, Odessa — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Pridgen, Janis 
Purse, Walton 



Reinstein, Cecil 

Roberts, Verdery 

Robertson, Electa — Honor Grad. 

Pape School 
Robinson, David 
Rockwell, Frances 
Ross, Nairn 
Rushing, Janet 



Saminsky, Selma 
Sanders, Marion 



Scarborough, James — Honor Grad, 

S. H. >. 
Scarborough, Marv — Honor Grad, 

S. H.S. 
Schuman, Margaret 
Scott, William 
Sheehan, Mary — Honor Grad. 

St. Vvnci nt's . lead. 
Simpson, Fred 
Smith, H. C. 

Smith, Sidney — Honor Grad, B. C. 
Stevens, Celia — Honor Grad, 

Herbert Hoover High, 

San Du go, Calif. 
Straight, George 
Sussman, Vivian 
Sutker, Harold 
Sutker, Solomon — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 



Taylor, Hugh 

Thomas, Mary Leek 

Traub, Herbert — Honor Grad, 

S. H. S. 
Truchelut, Burnett 
Truchelut, Harry 



Victor, Jeanne 
von Onsen, Gladys 

W 

Ware, Hoyt 
Weeks, Anna 
Wilson, Laura 
Wood, Margaret 
Wright, Margaret 









OF S A V \ \ \ A 11 . G E O R G 1 A 



.,! 



FRESHMEN ENROLLED L936 1981 



Adams, Charles 

Amos, Elbert Honor Grad. 
Darien, (!o. 

B 

Baggs, Ivie 

Barragan, Prank 

Bide*, Karl 

Boyd, Helen 

Breland, Woodrow 

Brennan, Helen — Honor Grad. 
St. Vina nt's Acad. 

Rurnham, Avery 



Chapman, Jane 
Cole, Ernestine 
Coley, Virgil 
Cone, Effie 
Cook, Gerald 
Cook, Marieta 
Cooper, Lillian 
Cranman, Arthur 
Crawford, Christine — Honor Grad. 
S. H. S. 



Davis, H. E. 

Deegan, Katharine 

de \ alinger, Wesley 

Dixon, Jewell — Honor Grad. 

Black shear, Ga. 
Dodd, Patricia 
Dotson, Florence 
DuFour, Edward 
DuPont, John 
DuPuis, Alma Wood — Honor Grad. 

Hardeeville, S. C. 



Egloff, Jeanette 
F 

Freeman, Samuel — Honor Grad. 
S. H. S. 



G 

Gardner, Prank 
Garrard, Mary 

GivenB, Louis 

Goette, Mary li. Honor Grad. 

St. Vincent's Acad. 
Gonchar, Sol 
Gould, Emily 
Gregory, Jean 
Groot, Evelyn 
Gumble, Adalinc — Honor Grad. 

Hawley, Pi nn. 

H 

Haas, Morton V. 
Haines, Garrard 
Harmon, Dora Lee 
Hatcher, James 
Bailsman, Martha 
Henderson, Sarah 
Hill, Georgia Anna 
Hipson, Jeanne 
Holler, Edna — Honor Grad. 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Hollis, Ruby — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Holloway, Ann 
Horswell, Richard 
Housholder, Nedra 
Hutchins, Claudine 
Hyrne, Godfrey 



Innecken, Paul 
J 

Jamieson, Alice 

Jenkins, Gere — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Johnson, Dorothy — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 

K 

Kent, Sadie 
Ketchum, Adele 
Kolman, Florence 
Kravitch, Roslyn 






ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



FRESHMEN ENROLLED 1936—1937 (Continued) 



Lamotte, Irene 
Leigh, Herbert 
Leon, Lettye 
Lynes, Betty 

M 

McLaughlin, John — Honor Grad. 

B.C. 
McLeod, Isabel — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
McLeod, Jeanette 
McRae, Rita 
.Marsh, Carlton 
Miller, Elizabeth — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Miller, Robert 
Moak, Earl 
Monsees, Geraldine 
Monteith, Janet 



N 



Nathan, Evelyn 
Nelson, Dorothy — Honor Grad. 
S. H. S. 







Orr, Sibyl— Honor Grad. S. H. S. 



Palmer, Amand 
Patrick, George 
Phillips, Arthur 
Pierce, Elizabeth 
Pierce, Sheila 
Pilgrim, Eleanor 
Powers, Eleanor 

Q 

Quinan, Virginia 
R 

Rawlings, Margaret 
Rice, W.illiam-. B* — Hono r Gradv 
Allendale, S. C. 



Richard, Douglas 
Roberts, Julia 
Rubin, Saul 

S 

Sander.-, Frank 
Schley, Jack 
Segall, Regina 
Seigler, Jack 
Seyle, Charles 
Sieg, Edward 
Solms, Selma 
Speir, Lee 
Stanley, George 
Stokes, Thomas 
Sweatt. Walter 



Thomas, Miriam 

Traub, Josephine — Honor Grad. 

S. H. S. 
Travis, Cecilia 
Tyre, John 

U 

Usher, Woodrow 

W 

Wade, Franklin 
Waite, Nelson 
Waldhour, Ardele 
Walker, Lucile 
Wall, Cecilia 
Wallace, Elizabeth 
Warner, Isabel 
White, Virginia 
Williams, Bette 
Wilson, Andrew 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Adams, Parker 
Fonseca, Frank 
Mayberry, James 
Torrance, Mrs. Eugene 



ULLETIN OF 

ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 

COLLEGE • 1938-1939 

A City Supported Junior College of Savannah, Georgia 




Volume III • Number! 






For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1938-1939 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 

A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




i 8333 



"Education is a companion which no misfortune can 
depress — no crime destroy — no enemy alienate — no despotism 
enslave. At home, a friend; abroad, an introduction; in 
solitude, a solace; and in society, an ornament." 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



The city of Savannah extends the privileges of Armstrong 
Junior College to those who are qualified for admission and 
desire to enrich their lives through education. Standards of 
work maintained in the College are such as to be especially 
inviting to students of good or superior ability. Students are 
expected to pursue diligently the courses of their choice and 
to be governed by the rules of propriety. 

— The President 



CALENDAR 1938—1939 

Fall Quart* r 

Explanation of courses to freshmen 

10 A. M. Auditorium . . . Monday, September 19 
Physical Examination freshmen .... September 19 

Freshman registration September 19 

Freshman preliminary 

tests . . . Tuesday-Wednesday, September 20-21 
Upperclassman registration and 

physical examination . Wednesday, September 21 
Opening exercises .... Thursday, September 22 

All classes begin September 22 

Test Friday, October 21 

Armistice Day address .... Friday, November 11 

Mid-term test Wednesday, November 23 

Thanksgiving 

holidays . . . Thursday-Friday, November 24-25 
Examinations . . Wednesday-Friday, December 14-16 
Christmas holidavs .... December 17-Januarv 1 



Winter Quarter 

Registration Monday, January 2 

All classes begin Tuesday, January 3 

Annual Ball Friday, January 20 

Mid-term test Friday, February 4 

Examinations . . . Monday-Wednesday, March 13-15 
Spring holidays . . . Thursday-Monday, March 16-20 

Spring Quart < r 

Registration Tuesday, March 21 

All classes begin Wednesday, March 22 

Mid-term test Friday, April 21 

Examinations Thursday-Saturday, June 1-3 

President's reception Saturday, June 3 

Commencement sermon Sunday, June 4 

Graduation exercises Monday, June 5 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Gi >i< '(il Information l» . 

College Commission 7 

Faculty 7 

History, Organization, and Aims 9 

Library 10 

Laboratories 11 

College Book Store 12 

Gifts to the College 12 

Athletic Policy 13 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 14 

Requirements for Admission 14 

Fees, Tuition, and Refunds 15 

Enrollment Procedure 16 

Testing and Guidance 17 

Student Load 18 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 18 

Explanation of Course Credit 18 

Transfers from Other Institutions 18 

Transfers to Other Institutions 18 

Reports and Grades 19 

Honor Points 19 

Honors 19 

Exchange Club Medal 20 

Perelstine Award 20 

Co-operation with Examiner of University System of Georgia . 20 

Final Examinations 21 

Repetition of a Course 21 

Attendance Regulations 21 

Rules on Personal Conduct 22 

Withdrawals 22 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 22 

Number Required in Courses 22 

Student Activities 22 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations 23 

College Organizations, Lectures, and Concerts 24 

Student Publications 24 

The Savannah Playhouse 24 

Holidays 25 

Adult Education 25 



6 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) 

Courses of Study j, , 

Certificates Granted 26 

General Requirement.-, for Graduation 26 

Liberal Arts 26 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Liberal Arts .... 27 

Home Economics 28 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Home Economics ... 28 

Finance and Commerce 29 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Finance and Commerce . 30 

Course Descriptions 

Division of Languages 31 

English 31 

Humanities 32 

Art 33 

French 33 

Spanish 34 

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 34 

Biological Sciences 34 

Physical Sciences 35 

Mathematics 36 

Division of Social Sciences 37 

History 37 

Political Science 38 

Economics 39 

Psychology 39 

Sociology 39 

Division of Finance and Commerce 39 

Division of Home Economics 41 

Courses in Physical Education and Library Economics ... 43 

First Honors Day Program 44 

First Graduation Exercise 45 

Graduates, 1937 46 

Students Enrolled Year 1937-1938 46 

Advanced Students 47 

Special Students 48 

First Year Students 49 



OF SAVANNAH, G E R G I A 



TI1K COIiLEGE COMMISSION 

Thomas Gambia Chairman 

HnscHEL V, Jenkins Viee-Chairman 

Henry Hi. in. Ex officio Mrs. Mills B. Lam: 

FEED (i. DOYLE I. A. Solomons, .Ik. 

Robkkt M. Hitch. Ex officio Mrs. Lucy H. Tkosdal 



THE FACULTY 

Ernest A. Lowe, B.S.C President 

J. Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A. . . . Dean 
and Instructor in Social Sciences 

William S. Boyd, B.S., University of Georgia; M.A., Emory University. 
Instructor in Biology. 

John P. Dyer, B.A., Bryson College; M.A., Peabody College; Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University. 

Instructor in Social Sciences. 

Frances Ennis, B.S.H.E., Georgia State College for Women; M.A. in 
Household Arts Education, Columbia University. 

Instructor in Home Economics. 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B. and M.A., University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., Mercer University; M.S., Emory University. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

Lulie Henderson, A.B. in Education, University of Georgia; A.B. in 
Library Science, Emory University. 

Librarian. 

Charles H. Herty, Ph.B., University of Georgia; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins; 
Ch.D., University of Pittsburgh; D.Sc, Colgate; LL.D., Univeristy 
of Georgia, University of North Carolina. 

Lecturer in Chemistry and Chemurgy. 

Reuben W. Holland, A.B. and M.A., Emory University. 

Instructor in Romance Languages and Treasurer. 

Stacy Keach, B.S. and M.A., Northwestern University. 
Instructor in English. 



8 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

ARTHUR Kolgaklis, B.S.C., Georgia School of Technology; M.B.A., Har- 
vard University. 

Instructor in Commerce. 

John- W. McNeill, B.S.C., and M.A., Ohio State University. 
Instructor in Finance and Commerce. 

Ivey M. Shiver, B.S.C., University of Georgia. 

Director of Athletics and Physical Education. 

Margaret Spencer, B. Mus., Converse College; A.B., University of 
Georgia; M.A., Columbia University. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Margaret Fortson Stephens, A.B., LL.B., and M.A., University of 
Georgia; Certificat, La Sorbonne, Paris. 

Instructor in English. 

Nelta Beckett, Associate in Liberal Arts, Armstrong Junior College. 
Secretary. 



o F S A V A N \ A li . GEORGIA 

HISTORY, ORGANIZATION, AND alms 

For the past few yean, Savannah and the BUITOUnding 

community have felt the need for an institution of higher 
learning. Realizing that there is an increasing number of 

young men and women who find it inconvenient or inad- 
visable to continue their education at out-of-town colleges, 
Mayor Thomas Gamble and a group of leading citizens 
conceived the idea of establishing a junior college in 
Savannah. These men, working tirelessly over a period of 
months, finally saw their hopes become an actuality when 
on May 27, 1935, the city council authorized the establish- 
ment of a municipally supported junior college to be 
governed temporarily by a commission of fourteen members 
appointed by the mayor. The first commission was com- 
posed of the following leading Savannah citizens: Chair- 
man, A. Pratt Adams; Vice-Chairman, Thomas Gamble; 
Henry Blun, H. L. Fulton, H. M. Garwes, H. F. Gibbons, 
H. V. Jenkins, H. L. Kayton, Mrs. Mills B. Lane, A. B. 
Lovett, Frank W. Spencer, O. B. Strong, Mrs. Lucy B. 
Trosdal, Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 General 
Assembly the size of the commission was reduced to eight 
including the Mayor and Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education as ex officio members. The day before 
the ordinance creating the college was passed, Mayor 
Gamble announced that the problem of housing the new 
school was solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz and her 
daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously pre- 
sented their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. 
Armstrong, their husband and father, respectively. Due to 
the many spacious rooms, remarkably few changes were 
necessary to fit the building for college purposes. The Arm- 
strong building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, is one 
of the most beautiful and expensive college buildings in 
the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded 
the Lucas Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in 
founding the Junior College. In his speech of acceptance 
Mr. Gamble announced that he had received the gift of a 



1" ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house classes in finance 
and commerce, the building to be named in honor of the 
donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings 
is the auditorium and recreation building erected and 
equipped by the city of Savannah and the federal govern- 
ment at a cost of $70,000. All three buildings, standing 
side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park 
in the city, which consists of forty acres and is used by 
Armstrong students for recreational purposes. The Georgia 
Historical Society library, to which the students have access, 
faces the park and lies just across Whitaker street from 
the College buildings. 

In the Fall of 1937 the heirs of General and Mrs. 
Alexander R. Lawton gave the handsome Lawton Memorial 
auditorium to the City of Savannah for the use and benefit 
of Armstrong Junior College and of the people of Savan- 
nah. While a definite use for the building has not been 
decided upon, this splendid gift will undoubtedly be of 
great value to the College and to the community in the 
years to come. 

The Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah 
and the adjacent community by giving to the young men 
and women who attend its classes an understanding of the 
world in which they live and an appreciation of the best 
that has been achieved by western civilization. Its graduates 
are equipped to continue their studies in the junior class 
of a senior college ; but for those who do not desire to 
pursue their work elsewhere, terminal work is offered. The 
College attempts to provide its students with a keener reali- 
zation of the duties and responsibilities of citizenship and 
a broader conception of the world and its problems. 

Library 
The College library and reading rooms are located on 
the first floor of the Armstrong building. The furniture is 
walnut, finished to blend with the walnut paneled room. 
The capacity of the two reading rooms is adequate to seat 
one-fourth of the student body. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA l l 

The book collection is being carefully chosen and gives 
indication of growing rapidly. There arc at present 6,000 
volumes. The collection is especially strong in biology, 

social science, and home economics material, with a fair 

representation of other subjects. The engineer's council of 
the Chamber oi' Commerce presented a technical library 

o\' several hundred volumes ; this gift and others have added 
strength to various sections. 

The reference section contains standard encyclopedias, 

dictionaries, and reference tools chosen with the needs and 
demands of junior college students in mind. The library 
subscribes to seventy-seven magazines, many for general 
reading and some technical and professional. Subscription 
to four daily newspapers is maintained. 

In addition to the College library, the students have 
access to the Savannah Public Library and the Library of 
the Georgia Historical Society, which is one-half block from 
the Junior College. These libraries cooperate in supplying 
not only general reading matter but also books especially 
used in the courses of study. 

The aim of the library is to meet the demands of junior 
college students by providing material necessary to a more 
complete understanding of their studies and to stimulate 
their interest and enjoyment in recreational reading from 
the best of the older and modern writers. A course in the 
facilities and use of the library is required of all students. 
This provides a better understanding of books and a more 
intelligent use of the library. 

The library is under the care of a trained librarian and 
student assistants. It is open thirteen hours each day of 
the week, with the exception of Sunday, when the library 
is closed. 

Laboratories 

Laboratories for chemistry and biology form an im- 
portant part of the instructional equipment of this insti- 
tution. Both laboratories are well equipped with facilities 
for handling sections of tw r enty students. In addition to 
the regular laboratory in biology, class demonstrations pro- 



12 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

vide indispensable aids in the teaching of human biology. A 
museum is being established which will furnish examples 
of many marine as well as inland forms of plants and 
animals. 

The College Book Store 

A book store is provided for the convenience of the 
students. Textbooks and classroom supplies are available 
at cost plus a minimum charge for handling. 

Gifts to the College 

No college was ever more fortunate in having good 
friends who have in so many instances satisfied needs of 
the institution through substantial gifts. This is truly a city 
college ; scores of Savannah citizens have contributed in 
some way to its establishment. 

Soon after it was known that the College would open 
in September, Mr. Boykin Paschal, president of the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, volunteered the services of that 
organization in the collection of books for the library. At 
the call of this group of progressive business and pro- 
fessional men, hundreds of Savannahians contributed books 
from their private libraries. Some two thousand volumes 
were delivered to the College by the Junior Chamber. 
Through their efforts, these gentlemen gave the College a 
collection which will be of permanent value. 

Mrs. B. F. Bullard, for many years a friend of education 
in this state, gave the College fifty volumes selected from 
her library and $200 with which to buy books and stage 
equipment. 

During the winter of 1935 Mr. Mills B. Lane, an out- 
standing Savannah citizen, purchased the home of Judge 
George T. Cann adjoining the College property, and pre- 
sented it to the Commission to be used to house classes in 
finance and commerce. This gift, with the exception of the 
gift of the original college building by Mrs. Lucy M. C. 
Moltz and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, is the 
largest that has thus far been made. 



OF S A \ INN AH , 6 E O R G 1 \ L8 

An auditorium and class room building was built ill 
L986 by the federal government and the city of Savannah 

at a COSt ^t $70,000, It has boon in use since September, 

L936. 

The handsome Lawton Memorial auditorium building 
on Bull street was given to the ( itj of Savannah for the 
use o( the Armstrong Junior College and the people of 

Savannah by the heirs of General and Mrs. Alexander R. 
Lawton in the Fall of 1937. 

Two friends of the College, both desiring to remain 
anonymous, have made contributions valued at .$2,000 each. 
One gift was for the purpose of making in the auditorium 
certain changes which will greatly increase the usefulness 
of the stage; the second gift was several hundred very 
valuable and useful books. 

In acknowledging gifts, the College wishes to express 
appreciation of the many books and periodicals presented 
by Mr. Thomas Gamble. Mr. Gamble is a frequent visitor 
at the College and he seldom comes without bringing one 
or more carefully selected volumes for the library. 

These gifts, and those of scores of other loyal friends 
whose names cannot be mentioned in the short space pro- 
vided in this bulletin, represent substantial contributions 
to the development of the College. The administration, 
faculty, and students wish to express their appreciation. 

Athletic Policy 
The administration and faculty of Armstrong Junior 
College believe that any program of education at the junior 
college level should include ample provision for training 
in physical education. Teams of Armstrong Junior College 
will engage in contests with other colleges, and a system of 
intra-mural sports will be developed. Sports that will be 
emphasized include football, golf, tennis, swimming, 
basketball, soft ball, fencing, horseback riding, and such 
others as student aptitude may indicate. It is thought that 
in classes in physical education especial emphasis should be 
placed on training in those sports which carry over into 
adult life. 



14 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

Since the establishment of the College, Savannah 
citizens and organizations have been extremely generous, 
in providing scholarship and loan funds for those students 
needing financial assistance. In addition to scholarships pro- 
vided locally, the National Youth Administration last year 
aided many students. This assistance has been extremely 
valuable to the College as it has been possible to use student 
talent in the several departments where help was needed. 

Students desiring aid may make application direct to the 
officers of the organizations listed below or to Professor 
Arthur Gignilliat, who is in charge of this work for the 
College. Application blanks may be obtained from Mr. 
Gignilliat. 

The organizations and individuals who have provided 
student aid through the past three years are : 

National Youth Administration 

B. H. Levy Brother and Co. 

Business & Professional Women's Club 

Federation of Women's Clubs 

Pilot Club 

Pilot's Association 

Landrum Lodge 

Friedmans' Jewelers 

Woman's Club of Jewish Alliance 

Pan Hellenic Association 

Savannah Rotary Club 

Mrs. Joseph-Brooks Abrams 

Harmonie Club 

Requirements for Admission 

A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior College 
must be a graduate of an accredited high school with fifteen 
units of credit. A general average of all high school work 
amounting to five points above the passing grade, when 
figures are used, or one step above passing, when letters 
are used, will be required. 



o P s A V A N N A II , GE0RG1 A i:, 

The following specific requirements must also be met : 

1. Eight constants — -*> units in English, - units in social 

studies, ~ units in mathematics ( I must be in 

algebra or a general mathematics course including 

algebra), and 1 unit in science. (For the year L938- 

39 a student will be accepted without science but 
will be required to elect two additional college 
science courses in addition to the prescribed courses). 

12. Seven or eight electives — 4 of these electives must 
be from the following subjects: English, social 
studies, mathematics, science, and foreign language. 
Four units may be from the vocational and avo- 
cational groups. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant 
should be made out on the proper forms by a competent 
official of the high school and mailed directly to the office 
of the Dean. This certificate becomes the property of the 
Junior College and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

Fees, Tuition, and Refunds 
Fees in Armstrong Junior College, including tuition, 
library fee, and a $5.00 student activity fee, will amount to 
a total of $105 for the year for resident and non-resident 
students alike, payable $35 upon entrance in September, 
$35 at the beginning of the second quarter in January, and 
$35 at the beginning of the third quarter in March. The 
student activity fee will include a subscription to The Ink- 
well, the College newspaper, one copy of the College 
annual, and entrance to some of the athletic contests. 

Students taking science courses with laboratory work 
will be required to pay a small fee which is indicated in the 
description of the science courses found under "Courses of 
Instruction" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Fall - - $35.00 Tuition and fees 
Winter - $35.00 Tuition and fees 
Spring - $35.00 Tuition and fees 

$105.00 Total 
Laboratory fees additional. 



L6 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Special students will be admitted only by permission of 
the Dean. For less than three courses in any one quarter 
the charge will be $15.00 I'm- each course. 

A late registration fee of $5.00 will be charged any 
students who fail to register and pay tuition fees on the day 
designed for registration at the beginning of each quarter, 
unless excused because of sickness. 

In afternoon and evening classes a fee of $8.00 will be 
charged for one-half course and $15.00 for one course, 
the maximum number of evening courses allowed for any 
one quarter. This rate applies to the courses taken within 
one quarter only. A course includes three eighty-five 
minute lecture periods each week. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a 
quarter will receive a refund of one-half of the tuition fee. 
No refunds will be made after the first thirty days of a 
term, and no refunds will be made to those dismissed from 
College. 

Enrollment Procedure 

Schedule of physical examinations for all first year 
students will be arranged September 19, and registration 
of freshmen will be completed on September 19. No student 
will be permitted to register unless a transcript showing- 
all high school and college credits earned is in the hands of 
the Dean. Considerable delay and perhaps expense may be 
avoided by attending to this matter at least one month be- 
fore school opens. 

Any freshman permitted to register after September 19 
will be charged a late registration fee of $5.00. Registra- 
tion includes the payment of fees to the Treasurer. 

All freshmen applicants must register in person and 
follow this procedure : 

1. Introduction of members of the faculty and ex- 
planation of courses at 10 A. M., September 19, in 
the College Auditorium. 



o p S A v \ \ \ A ll , GEORGIA it 

2. Physical examinations will be scheduled between 
the hours of ll A. M. and 1 P. M., September l ( .>. 

:i. Registration in the Auditorium, September 19. 

4. Payment of all fees in the Treasurer's office, Septem- 
ber li). This may be done any time between the 
hours of 11 :00 and 5:00. 

•*). Thursday and Friday, September 20 and 21 will be 
devoted to preliminary tests, which will be required 
of all freshmen without any exceptions. Tests are 
scheduled to begin at 9:00 A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

Registration, payment of fees, and schedule for physical 
examination of upperclassmen will be completed on Septem- 
ber 21. Any upperclassman permitted to register or pay 
fees after that date will be charged a late registration fee 
of $5.00. 

Testing and Guidance 

The College feels that it can render a most important 
service to the student by helping him find that vocation or 
profession where he can realize the most satisfaction and 
success in life. With this in mind a committee of testing 
and guidance has been set up through which the student 
may receive sound advice on his personal and vocational 
problems. This committee studies the individual student and 
tries to discover his aptitudes and abilities. The information 
thus obtained is utilized by the entire faculty. 

In order that the College may have the necessary in- 
formation upon which to build a satisfactory guidance 
program, all students are required to take a series of tests 
before entrance requirements are fulfilled and registration 
completed. All students are required to take a physical 
examination which is administered by the College in con- 
junction with the City Health Department. A student who 
can not take the examination at the appointed time will 
be given an examination at a later date and charged a fee 
of two dollars. The physical condition of each student is 
studied, and recommendations made where such are neces- 
sary. 



18 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Student Load 

A normal load is three and one-third courses each 
quarter, and students will be required to carry this amount 
of work unless special arrangements are made with the 
Dean. A student must pass nine courses before he will 
be ranked as a sophomore. 

Students who make two A's and have no grades below 
B for any one quarter may carry an additional course or a 
maximum of four and one-third courses for the subsequent 
quarter. 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 

Permission of the Dean is necessary to drop a subject 
or to transfer from one subject or section to another. 

Explanation of Course Credit 

The school year lasts nine months and is divided into 
three quarters, Fall, Winter, and Spring. A course includes 
five fifty-five minute lecture periods per week for one 
quarter. 

Transfers from other Institutions 

No student will be accepted from another college with- 
out a transcript of college work from that institution, and 
no student may enroll in Armstrong Junior College who has 
been dropped from another institution or who is on pro- 
bation from another institution because of poor scholarship. 

A student transferring to Armstrong Junior College will 
have his credits reduced unless at least three-fourths of 
all grades received at another college are above the lowest 
passing grade of that college. 

Transfers to other Institutions 

No student will be recommended for transfer to other 
institutions unless three-fourths of all grades received at 
Armstrong are above D. 



o F S \ V A \ \ A 11 . 6E0R61 A L9 

Reports and Grades 

\ic\)ov[s for every college student will be sent by the 
Dean to t ho parent or guardian at the end of each quarter. 
The reports are based upon the following system of 
marking : 

Grade A plus, Exceptional 1 honor points per 

course 

Grade A, Superior 3 honor points per 

course 

Grade B, Better than average 2 honor points per 

course 

Grade C, Average 1 honor point per 

course 

Grade D, Barely passing honor points per 

course 

Grade E, Incomplete Minus 1 honor point 

per course 

Grade F, Failure Minus 1 honor point 

per course 

Grade E (Incomplete) — An incomplete may be removed 
by means stipulated by the instructor of the course in which 
the student received the grade E. An E not removed in 
the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an F. 

Honor Points 

The number of honor points a student receives is deter- 
mined by the grades he makes, each grade carrying a 
certain number of honor points, as explained above. In 
order to graduate, a student must receive as many honor 
points, based upon the above grading system, as the num- 
ber of courses required for graduation, and as many honor 
points as courses taken by the student. 

Honors 

Students who maintain an average of B or above in 
each course during a quarter's work will be placed on the 



20 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Dean's Scholastic Attainment List. At the discretion of the 
Dean, special absence privileges may be granted to these 
students. 

The 20$ of (1) advanced students and (2) students 
with less than six quarters work who have the highest 
averages, provided this average is "B" or better, and have 
failed no courses, will be given special recognition on 
Honors Day. 

Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction) will be 
bestowed upon those receiving an average of 3 honor points 
per course. 

A valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class 
from among the five students with the highest scholastic 
average in the work completed before the term in which 
the students graduate. 

All students who receive recognition on Honors Day 
will have their names recorded on a permanent Dean's List 
in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. 

Exchange Club Medal 

The Exchange Club of the city of Savannah presents 
an expensive medallion to the student who makes the 
highest grade in the course on Contemporary Georgia. 

Perelstine Award 

Mr. Joseph Perelstine, prominent Savannah business 
man, awards annually a medal to the senior student in 
Commerce who achieves the highest scholastic average. The 
award is made on Honors Day. 

Cooperation with the Examiner of the 
University System of Georgia 

The University System of Georgia has inaugurated in 
certain courses a uniform examination plan under the super- 
vision of a trained technician. A number of these courses 
are offered by Armstrong Junior College. With the per- 



o p S A V A \ \ A II . GEORGIA 21 

mission of the Examiner and the administration of the 
University System of Georgia, Armstrong has been per- 
mitted to cooperate in this testing program. 

Final Examinations 

1. Regular written examinations arc required in all 

courses at the end of each quarter. These examinations are 
held on tin 4 last three or ("our days of the quarter, in ac- 
cordance with a permanent schedule. 

2. Final examinations, except in laboratory practice, 
are limited to a period of three hours. In courses in which 
a considerable portion of the examination is of a practical 
nature, the instructor may extend the time at his discretion. 

3. Special examinations for students who have been 
officially excused from regular examinations may be held 
at suitable times fixed by the instructors concerned. Such 
examinations must be taken within the succeeding quarter, 
and a fee of $1.00 will be assessed for each examination. 

Repetition of a Course 

A student who fails in not more than one course during 
a quarter may repeat the same subject in addition to carry- 
ing a normal load of three and one-third courses in a sub- 
sequent quarter if work is generally satisfactory. Per- 
mission of the Dean is necessary and a fee of $ 1-00 will be 
charged. 

Attendance Regulations 

Students are allowed three unexcused absences per 
course. Excess absences must be satisfactorily explained to 
the instructor in charge of the course or to the Dean, if class 
work is to continue. Special faculty action will be required 
before a student may receive credit on a course from which 
he has been absent eight or more times. 

Upon request, special absence privileges may be granted 
a student who is on the Dean's List, but the granting of such 
privileges is within the discretion of the Dean. 



22 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

A student who is absent from any class two days he- 
fore or after a holiday or the beginning or ending of a term 
will be assessed $1.00 for each day or part of a day absent. 

Rules on Personal Conduct 

Students are requested to maintain high standards of 
personal conduct and character. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented in writing to the Dean, 
is a prerequisite to honorable dismissal or re-entrance to this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should im- 
mediately make such intentions known to the President. 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 

All students failing (except in cases excused before 
examinations on account of sickness) to pass at least one 
course other than physical education in any one quarter 
will be dropped from the rolls of the College. All students 
who fail to make an average of at least five honor points 
(not more than one honor point will be counted in this 
reckoning for physical education) during the first three 
quarter's work at the Junior College will not be allowed 
to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students 
with less than a "C" average at the end of the fourth 
quarter of college work. 

Number Required in Courses 

Unless at least fifteen students register for the course 
no course will be given without special action of the Dean. 

Student Activities 

Believing that self-discipline by the individual student 
has educational value, the faculty has endeavored to create 
an atmosphere of freedom around the College. The students 
have been free to form scholarly habits, to develop indi- 
vidual abilities and to practice self-restraint in a manner 



O F S A \ A \ N \ 11 , GEORGIA 28 

becoming adults. In keeping with this policy, which has 
been very successful so far, the faculty will place the same 
responsibilities upon and give the same freedom to in- 
coming freshmen. The faculty is unalterably opposed to 

hazing In any form. 

The College faculty and students will hold a scries of 
closed dances throughout the year. 

The President and faculty will provide regulations for 
student organizations. Any student group desiring to hold 
any public meeting or social event in the name of the 
College or in the name of the student organizations must 
notify the Committee on Student Activities two weeks in ad- 
vance of the meeting and find a place on the calendar kept 
in the President's office. 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations 

1. Any group of students desiring to organize a social 
club must submit to the Faculty Committee on Student Ac- 
tivities a petition for a charter. This petition should contain 
the following information : 

(1) Name of the proposed organization 

(2) Aims and purposes of the organization 

(3) Proposed regulations governing membership, 
initiation, and dues 

(4) Plan of organization 

(5) Proposed time and place of meeting 

(6) Name of proposed sponsor 

(7) Names of proposed members. 

2. No student may become a member of any social 
organization unless he or she has earned at least four honor 
points in the quarter preceding initiation. A student who 
has not earned the required number of honor points may, 
however, be pledged as a prospective member but may not 
enjoy full privileges of membership until after formal 
initiation. 

3. No student shall be pledged as a prospective mem- 
ber of any social organization before the end of the third 
week of his or her first quarter at Armstrong. 



24 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

4. All invitations to membership should be in writing. 
The invitation should be accepted or declined, in writing, 
within three days of the date upon which it is received. 
The reply to the invitation should be addressed to the 
Chairman of the Faculty Committee on Student Activities 
who will notify the organization and keep the replies on file. 

">. Any student organization desiring to give an enter- 
tainment shall notify the Chairman of the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Student Activities of such proposed entertainment 
at least two weeks in advance, stating, in writing, the nature 
of the entertainment, the time and place, and the chaperons 
to be invited. 

6. The sponsor of a social organization should not be 
a member of the faculty of the college. 

College Organizations, Lectures, and Concerts 

The College sponsors a glee club, an orchestra, a literary 
society, and dramatics. During the year these organizations 
present programs at student assemblies and, occasionally, 
to the public. All students showing ability and interest are 
eligible for membership in these organizations. 

Students of Armstrong are provided unusual opportuni- 
ties to hear some of the best lecturers in America as well as 
concert artists of ability. Through a special arrangement 
with the Savannah Community Forum, students of the 
College are permitted to attend six lectures during the fall 
and winter for the small fee of SI. 00. These lectures are 
given in the college auditorium. 

Student Publications 

The official organ of the student body is the Inkwell and 
is published once a month. The Geechee is the College year 
book. 

The Savannah Playhouse 

The Savannah Playhouse of Armstrong Junior College 
was founded in 1936 for the purpose of emphasizing the 
study of speech and of serving the student body and com- 



OF S A V A \ \ A II , G E R <; I A 26 

niunity in the field of the drama and its allied arts. Tin' 

playhouse thus provides opportunity for one t<> enrich his 

background in the drama and to participate in Stage pro- 
ductions. 

Students desiring to do so may study SUCh subjects as 

History o( the Theatre, Stage Lighting, Stagecraft, Stage 

Costuming, Scene Designing, and Acting- These courses 
are fully described under English 5 and () in the section 
entitled "Course Descriptions," pages 31-32. 

It is the aim of this theatre to produce from time to 
time various forms of the drama which are worthy of the 
experimental theatre. 

Student experience in the many phases of the work of 
the Playhouse not only constitutes foundation work for ad- 
vanced study in the field, but develops a confidence in one's 
ability to think and speak correctly. The College speech 
courses have had comparatively heavy registration from 
the beginning. Students taking these courses are given an 
opportunity to assist in the development of the theatre. 

Holidays 

The College calendar provides for holidays only at 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and in the Spring. One additional 
holiday will be granted when the faculty attends the meet- 
ing of the Georgia Education Association. Although the 
school will not suspend classes for other occasions, students 
desiring to recognize religious holidays may do so, and a 
limited number of absences is allowed for such occasions. 

Adult Education 

The College will offer afternoon or evening classes for 
adults. The same number of hours will be spent in these 
classes as is spent in those on the regular schedule. The fee 
will be $15 per course. No course will be given for fewer 
than ten students. 



26 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 

Certificates Granted 

The College will offer work leading to three different 
certificates: Associate in Liberal Arts, Associate in Home 
Economics, and Associate in Finance and Commerce. Ap- 
plications for these certificates must be filed in the office 
of the Dean by April 1st. 

General Requirements for Graduation 

1. In order to graduate a candidate must have to his 
credit as many honor points as the number of courses re- 
quired for graduation and as many honor points as the 
number of courses completed. (For an explanation of honor 
points, see "Honor Points,'' page 19.) 

2. A brief non-credit course in library science, a study 
of the use of books and the library, is required of all first- 
year students during the first quarter. A detailed descrip- 
tion of this course is found on page 43. 

3. Not more than ten courses (33 1 3 semester hours) 
will be accepted from another institution toward the com- 
pletion of work on a certificate, and all transfer students 
must remain in residence for nine consecutive months, re- 
gardless of the number of credits received elsewhere. Under 
all circumstances the student must attend the Junior College 
during the last quarter when work is completed on a 
certificate. 

4. A student transferring to Armstrong will have his 
credits reduced if more than one-fourth of all grades re- 
ceived at another college are the lowest passing grade in 
that college. 

Liberal Arts 

The Liberal Arts course is designed for those students 
who desire a broad educational background ; it is concerned 
with man and with the achievements of civilization. The 



OF S A V A N \ A II 



G E n G 



COUrse deals with man's natural, social, and cultural history 
and seeks to give the student an understanding of the past 

and its relationship to the present. 

When he lias completed the course, the student is ex- 
pected to have some knowledge of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of natural science, of the great movements which 
have directed the course of civilization, and of the artistic 
and literary masterpieces of the world. The student is then 
ready to specialize in any field he chooses — natural or 
social science, literature, art or commerce. It', however, the 
student does not expect to continue his education further 
in college, he is ready to go into his life's work better able 
to understand and to see in their proper relationships the 
problems of life and of society, and to appreciate more fully 
man's achievements and aspirations. 

By a proper selection of electives, liberal arts students 
may prepare themselves for the technical and professional 
courses in senior colleges. Correspondence with the senior 
college concerned should be undertaken by the student in 
planning such a course of study. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Liberal Arts 

Social Science . . 2, 3 2 courses 

Biology 2 courses 

Humanities . . . 1, 2, (or 2 courses 

in English) . . 2 courses 

English .... 11-12 2 courses 

Foreign Language * 2 courses 

Mathematics 1 course 

Political Science .12 1 course 

Physical Educationf 2 courses 

Total specified 14 courses 

Electives 6 courses 

Total for graduation 20 courses 

* Students who have had two high school units in French must 
schedule French 3-4. Those students offering three units must 
schedule two of the following: French 4, 5, 6. 

t On recommendation of the Dean, a substitute course may be made 
for Physical Education. 



Us 



A KM STRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Home Economics 

In view of the fact that an appreciation of the problems 
of home making is desirable for all young women whether 
they continue work at a senior college or not, the Home 
Economics course at Armstrong Junior College is designed 
to help the greatest number, and, at the same time, satisfy 
the requirements of the senior college for those who wish 
to major in home economics. The work beyond the general 
core courses will be taken in the field of home economics 
and closely related subjects. 

The entrance requirements to the home economics 
course are the same as for the liberal ails and commerce 
courses. 

With the exception of Dietetics and the course in meal 
planning and table service, home economics courses have 
been planned without prerequisite. The four courses select- 
ed in home economics are those that will give a broad train- 
ing, fit the girls for home making, and give them a richer 
life. 

The home economics clothing laboratory is splendidly 
equipped. The foods laboratory has five home kitchens and 
an attractive serving-unit. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Home Economics 



Art .... 
Biology . . . 
Chemistry 
English . . . 
Home Economics 
Humanities . . 

Mathematics 
Political Science 
Physical Education 
Social Science 
Sociology . . 



11 .... 
11-12 . . . 
1-2 .... 
11-12 . . . 
1, 2, 3 and 5 

1, 2, (or 2 courses 

in English) 
1 

12 .... 
1-2 .... 
2-3 .... 
60 .... 



Total specified 20 

Total for graduation 20 



course 

courses 

courses 

courses 

courses 

courses 

course 

course 

courses 

courses 

course 

courses 
courses 



OF S A V A N N A 11 , GEORGIA 29 

Finance and Comnu rce 

The Junior College offers a three-year course leading 
to an Associate in Finance and Commerce diploma. The 
entrance requirements arc the same as for other courses 
offered in Armstrong Junior College. 

The course of study that has been devised is expected 
to aid the student in understanding himself and society, 
to give him some knowledge of the way the world of finance, 
industry, and trade operates, and to provide some train- 
ing- in the techniques of business. Before graduation the 
student will be required to pass a test in shorthand and 
typing. 

The three-year course of study outlined below has been 
constructed to meet the needs of those who will participate 
in the life of the business community, remembering that 
Savannah is an important sea port and financial center. As 
the work is of a terminal nature, i.e., a complete course with- 
in itself which gives technical training in a specified field, 
only those students who wish to complete their work at the 
Junior College will be advised to take this course. If any 
student desires a four-year course in finance and commerce, 
he should pursue liberal arts at the Junior College with 
electives in economics, psychology, and accounting, and 
transfer to a senior college after two years at Armstrong. 

By meeting all liberal arts requirements, a commerce 
student may receive a certificate in liberal arts at the end 
of the second year; one additional year's work will be re- 
quired for the diploma in finance and commerce. 



30 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Finance and Commerce 

First Year 

Social Science 2, 3 2 courses 

Human Biology . 11-12 2 courses 

Commerce ... 1 1 course 

Economics ...21 1 course 

English .... 1 1 course 

Mathematics . . 1 or 2 and 14 ... 2 courses 

Physical Education 1 course 

Total 10 courses 

Second Year 

Commerce . . . 2-3 2 courses 

Commerce . . . 4 or elective ... 1 course 
Commerce . . . 7-8 (or foreign 

language*) . . 2 courses 

Humanities ... 1-2 2 courses 

Political Science .12 1 course 

Psychology ...31 1 course 

Physical Education (or Shorthand 

and Typing) .... 1 course 

Total specified 10 courses 

Third Year 

Commerce . . . 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12 . . 6 courses 

Social Science . . 4 1 course 

Electives (or Commerce 7-8) 2 courses 

Total 9 courses 

* Foreign language must be chosen if the student is working toward 
a Liberal Arts certificate with electives in Commerce. 



o P S A V \ N \ A H . GEORGIA 81 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

DIVISION OF LANG UAG ES 

English 

1. Grammar and Composition 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A review of punctuation and the fundamentals of gram- 
mar. Essays are read and discussed and themes are written 
weekly. Several novels are read out of class and reported 
on at stated intervals. The course attempts to teach the 
student to understand what he reads, to acquire a larger 
and more complete vocabulary, and to be able to organize 
and express his thoughts orally and in writing. 

2. Introduction to Literature 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of literature by types, this course includes the 
reading and discussion of representative essays, short 
stories, plays, and poems of the most outstanding English 
and American authors of the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Five or more novels will be used for collateral 
reading. 

3. Business Writing Practice 

5 hours a w^eek for one quarter. 

4. Introduction to Poetry 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course deals with the history of English poetry, a 
study of the various types and forms, and a reading and 
understanding of representative works from the leading 
English and American poets. 

5. Play Production 

5 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory work per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

This course includes a fundamental study of production 
methods with emphasis upon the technical aspects of pro- 
ducing plays in the modern theatre, such as : the physical 



- ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

theatre, brief history of the physical development of the 
theatre, stage craft, construction of settings, stage lighting, 
stage costuming, and stage make-up. Each member of the 
production class will be required to work on a minimum 
of one crew during the term. 

(>. Play Production (Prerequisite English 5) 
5 hours lecture per week for one quarter. 

This course is an advanced production course in the 
study of play directing and acting, devoted both to the his- 
torical and contemporary theatre. 

7. Public Speaking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A fundamental course designed to develop the public 
speaker. Emphasis is placed upon platform delivery and 
elements governing effective speaking in audience relation- 
ship. 

11-12. Freshman English 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

The course has a two-fold objective: to teach the stu- 
dent to grasp the ideas of others through learning to read 
intelligently, and to teach him to express his own ideas 
logically and forcefully in speech and in writing. Particu- 
lar emphasis is placed on acquiring a complete and usable 
vocabulary. Formal grammar, punctuation and spelling are 
applied in the papers and reports prepared by the students. 
Several novels and biographies are used as collateral 
reading. A considerable part of the course will be devoted 
to oral English. 

Humanities 

1-2. Humanities 

5 hours lecture per week for two quarters. Re- 
quired of all students planning to attend the Uni- 
versity System. 

A survey of the cultural achievements of Western Civili- 
zation. The course seeks to give the student a general under- 
standing of the leading intellectual and esthetic movements 
of Western Europe and an acquaintance with the greatest 



o P S A V A N \ A II . G E O RG 1 \ 88 

literary figures from Homer to Galsworthy. Painting, Bculp- 
ture, and architecture are considered. 

Art 

1 1 . Art Principles and Design 

2 lectures and 8 hours laboratory work per week 
for one quarter. Fee $2. 50. 

A study of fundamental principles underlying all art. 
Laboratory work in the use of line, mass, and color. Intro- 
duction to color theory and lettering. 

French 

1-2. Elementary French 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

The elements of French grammar are studied with a 
view to early reading. Some 450 pages of classroom and 
collateral readings are completed. Attention is given to 
pronunciation, composition, and conversation. 

No credit will be allowed until French 2 is completed. 

3. Intermediate French 

5 hours per week for one quarter. 
Review grammar with continued stress on composition 
and oral practice. Reading of 400 pages of standard texts. 

4. Nineteenth Century French Prose 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A survey of the prose writings of the nineteenth century. 
Reading and discussion of 500 pages from representative 
writers. Reports on collateral reading. 

5. French Classical Drama 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
Representative plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 
Four plays to be read in class and four plays to be read as 
collateral. 

6. French Short Stories 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of the short story in France. 



34 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Spanish 

:>. Intermediate Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A review of Spanish grammar with extensive oral prac- 
tice. Reading of selected texts from nineteenth century 
prose writers. 

4. Teatro espanol 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of Spanish drama with particular emphasis on 
contemporary authors. 

5. Commercial Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of business methods in Spanish America to- 
gether with the writing of business letters in Spanish. Ex- 
tensive practice. 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
AND MATHEMATICS 

Biological Sciences 

3. Invertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

A study of invertebrate animals including local fresh 
water and marine forms. 

4. General Vertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 
11-12) 

4 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

An intensive study of the vertebrate group including 
laboratory dissection of several types. The study will in- 
clude the kinds of vertebrates and their distribution in time 
and space, vertebrate embryology, and details of the 
various vertebrate organ systems. Biology of The Vertebrates, 
by Walter, is the text used. 



r S A V \ N \ \ II . GEORGIA 

5. Genera] Botany (Prerequisite Biology Ll-12) 

.*> hours lecture and (> hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee (2.50. 

A genera] survej of the plant kingdom with particular 

emphasis on the identification and study of local forms. 
This course sots forth tho important facts and interpreta- 
tions with which botanical science is concerned. 

11-12. Human Biology 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Required of 

all students planning to attend the University 
System of Georgia. 

This course is designed to give the student an under- 
standing of general biological principles, particularly as 
applied to the human organism. The first half of the course 
includes a study of fundamental facts of biology, human 
anatomy, and physiology. The second half of the course 
includes studies in problems of public health, reproduction, 
and the principles of genetics, evolution, and eugenics. 

Physical Sciences 
1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit 
$2.50. 

The first course is a study of the preparation, properties, 
and uses of a number of the non-metallic elements and their 
compounds. The fundamental laws of elementary inorganic 
chemistry are stressed. 

The second course is a continuation of Chemistry 1, and 
includes the preparation, properties, and uses of the more 
common metallic elements and their compounds. The 
laboratory work will offer several experiments which will 
serve as an introduction to qualitative and quantitative 
analysis. 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 1-2) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit $2.50. 



36 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The text used is by Louis J. Curtman. The lectures will 
deal with the theoretical aspects of the subject with special 
reference to the application of the law of mass action. The 
laboratory work will consist of a study of the reactions, 
precipitations, and detections of the principal metals and 
acid radicals. 

21-22. General Physics (not offered 1938-39) 

4 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory work per 
week for two quarters. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Deposit $2.50. 

This course is a study of the properties of matter, 
mechanics of solids, mechanics of fluids and heat, sound, 
light, and electricity. 

11-12. Physical Science 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Required of 
all students planning to attend the University 
System of Georgia. 

This course is a survey of the Physical Sciences. The 
subject matter is taken from the fields of physics, chemistry, 
astronomy, geology, and geography. In general, the objec- 
tives of the course are : to make one more familiar with the 
physical phenomena of our environment ; to develop an ap- 
preciation of the scientific method ; and to furnish a cultural 
and general informational background which may be used 
as a foundation for future work by those students whose 
interests may lie in the field of the Physical Sciences. 

Mathematics 

1. A survey of Mathematics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The subject matter stressed in this course is of utili- 
tarian and cultural nature. Work in finance and statistics 
is included with a study of the fundamentals of algebra and 
trigonometry. The introduction traces the history of our 
system of computation, showing the role mathematics has 
played in our social development. 



o P S A V A \ \ A H , (i E R G I A 

2. College Algebra 

5 hours a week for one Quarter. 

A study of Quadratics; ratio, proportion, and variation; 
the binomial theorem; complex numbers; theory of 
equations; determinants; logarithms and the slide-rule; 
and permutations, combinations, and probability. 

3. Trigonometry 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Plane and spherical trigonometry. 

4. Analytic Geometry (Prerequisite Mathematics 2 
and 3) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

An introductory course dealing with such topics as co- 
ordinate systems, transformations, loci and their equations, 
the straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, and 
the geometric interpretation of the general equation of the 
second degree ; also polar coordinates and analytic geometry 
of three dimensions. 

14. Elements of Statistics (Prerequisite Mathematics 
1 or 2) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The collection, classification, and presentation of nu- 
merical data. 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

History 

2. The Progress of Western Civilization through the 
Industrial Revolution (1660-1870) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The parliamentary system of England, absolutism, Vol- 
taire, the French Revolution, the rise of capitalism, the In- 
dustrial Revolution, socialism, nationalism, the rise of the 
United States, the influence of the American frontier, and 
the scientific and social progress of the 19th century are 
surveyed. 






88 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

3. The Contemporary World (1870-1938) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Industrialization of the nations, imperialism, causes of 
the World War, post-war nationalism, movements toward 
economic self-sufficiency, dictatorships, the New Deal, move- 
ments for world peace, and scientific and social progress 
of the 20th century are surveyed. 

4. Contemporary Georgia 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Required of all 
students planning to attend the University System 
of Georgia. 

The economic, social, and political problems of Georgia 
are studied with particular emphasis on regional and nation- 
al problems which impinge, either directly or indirectly, on 
our state. Human and natural resources, the conditions of 
agriculture and industry, and problems of state and local 
governments are surveyed. 

5. English History 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Particular emphasis will be placed upon English back- 
grounds of American history. 

Political Science 

12. American Government and Politics 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Principal emphasis is placed upon principles, processes, 
and problems, with some attention given to political de- 
velopments under the New Deal. 

14. The Governments of Europe (Prerequisite 2 
courses in Social Science) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Particular emphasis is placed on the political machinery 
and problems of government in England, France, Italy, 
Germany, and Russia. European governmental methods 
that differ from our own will be given special attention. 



OF S A \ \ \ \ \ ll , 6 E O R G ] A 

Economics 

21. Introductory Economics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A course which introduces the student to economic con- 
cepts and principles with duo attention to modern economic 
institutions and problems. 



Psychology 

31. Introductory Psychology 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

An introduction to the scientific study of mental life. 

Sociology 

60. Family Relationships 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of factors which have made for permanency in 
family life ; changing social and economic conditions which 
affect family members in their relations with each other 
and the community ; survivals of various characteristics 
affecting family life and consideration of their worth ; con- 
servation of the family and education for family life. 



DIVISION OF FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

1. Introduction to Business Organization (Prerequisite 
to all commerce courses) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course and mathematics 1 are prerequisite to all 
other commerce courses. Commerce 1 is designed to in- 
troduce students to the field of business organization and 
management. A description of the structure and functions 
of modern business is presented and an insight given into 
the fields or divisions of business. Careful attention is given 
to a study of the importance and scope of each field and its 
relation to the other fields of work emphasized. 



40 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

2-3. Accounting 

3 hours lectures and 4 hours laboratory a week 

for two quarters. 

Principles of single proprietorship, partnership, and 

corporation accounting; the balance sheet, profit and loss 

statements, and the theory of debits and credits. In course 

3 intermediate accounting will be covered. 

4. Accounting Problems 

3 lectures and 4 hours laboratory a week. 

5. Marketing 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A general critical survey of the field of marketing and 
consumer demand in relation to the marketing machinery. 
Functions, methods, policies, marketing costs, and the 
problems of the farmer, manufacturer, wholesaler, com- 
mission merchant, broker, retailer, and other middlemen. 
Emphasis on principles, trends, and policies in relation to 
marketing efficiency. 

6. Marketing (Prerequisite Marketing 5) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Special attention is given means, methods, and problems 
relating to retailing. Some attention is devoted to credits 
and collections. 

7. Money and Banking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of the principles, functions, and forms of money 
and credit; analysis of money and credit problems; theory 
of money and banking; and banking practices. 

8. Business Finance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of business financial organization with special 
attention to the corporation ; management of capital ; prob- 
lems of financial administration and securities; analysis of 
causes of failures. 

9. Marketing (Prerequisite Marketing 5) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A course in salesmanship and advertising. 






OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 41 

LO, Insurance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of life, fire, health, and accident insurance; 

employer's liability, title and credit insurance; and insur- 
ance and bonding companies. 

11-1:2. Business Law 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

A brief study of law from the business man's standpoint 
dealing with such subjects as contracts, wills, sales, negoti- 
able instruments. Attention is given to the historic and 
economic development of certain principles of commercial 
usage. Where Georgia statutes and practices are at variance 
with those of other states, the Georgia rules are emphasized. 

21. Shorthand and Typing 

3 hours class room work and 2 hours practice each 
week. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. 

DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Clothing 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. 

This course is designed to establish appreciations, inter- 
ests, habits, and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, 
design, construction, and care of clothing. Problems are 
provided so that students gain actual experience in ap- 
plication of these fundamental principles. The clothing 
budget is studied as an aid in obtaining the greatest satis- 
faction from the money spent for clothing. 

2. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A study of food emphasizing its selection and prepara- 
tion, applying fundamental scientific principles. A unit in 
marketing will present actual problems of consumer, ob- 
servation of marketing conditions, factors affecting price, 



42 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

grades, brands of food, and training for more intelligent 
buying. The unit in common foods and their preparation 
acts as a basis for further meal preparation. 

3. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A continuation of foods including different types of 
dishes used for specific purposes, food selection, meal 
planning, and table service. Students gain actual experience 
in all forms of family entertaining such as family meals, 
buffets, teas and receptions. 

5. Home Planning and Furnishing 

4 lectures, 2 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. 

A study of planning and furnishing the home from the 
standpoint of family needs; modern tendencies in housing 
and application of principles of art to home furnishing; a 
short history of architecture ; location of house ; study of 
floor plans, exteriors, grounds, furnishings of various rooms 
emphasizing heating and lighting and treatment of walls, 
floors, windows, together with selection and arrangement 
of furnishings. A short study of house care and manage- 
ment will be made. 






OF S A V A X \ \ 11 . G E R G I A 48 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
LIBRARY ECONOMICS 

1. Freshman Physical Education 

8 hours lecture a week throughout the year. 

One course, special lectures. Games and various group 
activities to meet individual needs indicated by medical and 
physical examination and previous physical education. 
Follow-up physical examinations, conferences, and health 
lectures. 

2. Sophomore Physical Education 

3 hours lecture a week throughout the year. 

One course, special lectures. Continuation of Physical 
Education 1. A wider choice of activities is permitted. 

Library Economics 

1. A short course in the facilities and use of the library 
is required of all freshmen. No credit is allowed, but the 
course must be passed before the student receives credit 
for work completed at the College. 



44 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



FIRST HONORS DAY PROGRAM 

FRIDAY, JUNE 4, 1937 
Procession 

Order of Procession: Commencement Marshal, Speakers, (iuests, College Com- 
mission, Faculty, Sophomore Honor Students, Freshmen Honor Students. 

Song America 

Invocation Reverend A. L. Patterson, D.D. 

Solo Mr. George Stanley 

Valedictory Address Mr. Robert McCuen 

Presentation of Honor Students Dean J. Thomas Askew 

Prizes and Awards Charles H. Herty, Ph.D. 

Address Rabbi George Solomon, D.D. 

Benediction Reverend W. A. Taliaferro, D.D. 

PERMANENT DEAN'S SCHOLASTIC ATTAINMENT LIST 

Upper 20% of Each Class 

SOPHOMORES 

(20 Courses Except Where Otherwise 
Stipulated) 
Name Honor Points 

Solomon Sutker....(21 Courses). .61 

Edith Beery 54 

Elizabeth Cobb 54 

Robert McCuen 54 

3% 

Elizabeth Gnann 53 

Electa Robertson 53 

Janet Rushing 52 

Harold Sutker 51 

Marilouise Lockwood 46 

David Robinson 46 

Herbert Traub. 45 

10% 

Sidney Smith (22 Courses) ..49 

Grace Bounds 43 

Louise Mayhew 43 

Ann Gibson (22 Courses) ..47 

Hinckly Murphy 42 

Odessa Poythress 42 

Frances Blomquist 41 

Cecil Reinstein 41 

Nelta Beckett 40 

Coleman Mopper.. (21 Courses). .41 

20% 



FRESHMEN 

(10 Courses Except Where Otherwise 
Stipulated) 
Name Honor Points 

Sibyl Orr 28 

Gere Jenkins (13 Courses) ..35 

Adaline Gumble 26 

Wesley de Valinger 24 

3% 

Christine Crawford 23 

Georgia Anna Hill 23 

Betty Lynes 23 

Mary Garrard 22 

William B. Rice 22 

Gerald Cook 21 

Samuel Freeman 21 

Josephine Traub.... ( 13 Courses) -.26 
10% ______^^_ 

Helen Brennan 20 

Morton Haas 20 

Dorothy Johnson 20 

Cecilia* Travis 20 

Louis Givens (13 Courses) ..25 

Celia Stevens (16 Courses). .29 

Nedra Housholder 18 

Claudine Hutchins 18 

Selma Solms 18 

John DuPont 17 

Edna Holler 17 

20% 

Honorable Mention (less than 9 courses) 

Mary Bernard Goette 17 

(6 Courses) 
Isabel Warner (8 Courses). ...19 






o P S A V A N N A li , GEORGIA 16 



FIRST GRADUATION fcXKKCISKS 

SATURDAY, JUNE 5, L937 

1:00 P. M. 
Senior Luncheon De Soto Hold 

9:00 P. M. 
Armstrong Dance College Auditorium 



SUNDAY, JUNE 6, 1937 
11:00 A. M. 

Song All Hail the Power of Jesus Name 

Invocation Honorable Frank Oliver 

Solo Mr. Hugh Taylor 

Baccalaureate Sermon 

Rt. Reverend Middleton S. Barnwell, D.D. 

Song Onward Christian Soldiers 

Benediction Honorable Robert M. Hitch, LL.D. 

MONDAY, JUNE 7, 1937 

11:00 A. M. 
Procession 

Order of Procession: Commencement Marshal, Speakers, Guests, College Conk, 
mission. Faculty, Graduates, Liberal Arts, Home Economics. 

Song America 

Invocation Very Reverend Boniface Bauer, O.S.B. 

Solo Mr. George Stanley 

Introduction of Speaker Honorable Thomas Gamble 

Address 

President, Wesleyan College, Dice R. Anderson, Ph.D. 

Presentation of Graduates Dean J. Thomas Askew 

Conferring of Certificates President E. A. Lowe 

Song Alma Mater 

Benediction Reverend C. A. Linn, Ph.D. 



46 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



GRADUATES, 1937 



Beckett, Nelta 
Beery, Edith 
Blomquist, Frances 

Hound.-, Grace 
Bowyer, H. L. 
Bryan, Virginia 
Cargill, Pauline 
Carr, Thomas 
Cason, Lela 
Chan, Sin Fah 
Cobb, Elizabeth 
Cooper, Bertram 
Exley, Walton 
Gibson, Ann 
Gnann, Elizabeth 
Gnann, Mary Jane 
Grantham, Mary E. 
Hardwick, Wendell 
Heriot, Robert 
Herndon, Helene 
Hull, Robert 
Jeffords, Arthur 
Johnson, Mark 
Karnibad, Nathan 
Keever, Rachel 
Kronstadt, Reuben 
Lanier, Robert 
Laughlin, Nelle 
Lee, Martha 
Levy, Elizabeth 
Lines, Alva 
Lockwood, Marilouise 
McCreery, James 
McCuen, Robert 
Mclntire, Nell 
Mann, William 
Mayhew, Carol 
Mayhew, Louise 
Meadows, Carolyn 



Mopper, Coleman 
Morris, Callie 
Morrow, Marguerite 
Morgan, Edward 
.Murphy, Eleanor 
Murphy, Hinckly 
Oast, Fannie 
Oelschig, Augusta 
Oliver, Caroline 
Oliver, Carolyn 
Opper, Louise 
Otto, Georgia Rose 
Park, Ophelia 
Poythress, Odessa 
Pridgen, Janis 
Purse, Walton 
Reinstein, Cecil 
Roberts, Verdery 
Robertson, Electa 
Robinson, David 
Rockwell, Frances 
Rushing, Janet 
Saminsky, Selma 
Scarborough, James 
Scarborough, Mary 
Schuman, Margaret 
Scott, William 
Sheehan, Mary 
Simpson, Fred 
Smith, H. C. 
Smith, Sidney 
Sutker, Harold 
Sutker, Solomon 
Traub, Herbert 
Victor, Jeanne 
Ware, Hoyt 
Wilson, Laura 
Wright, Margaret 



STUDENTS ENROLLED YEAR 1937—1938 



Total No. Advanced Students 
Total No. First Year Students 
Total No. Special Students 
Evening School Students 

Grand Total 



89 

163 

4 

104 

360 



() F S A \ A \ \ A H 



GEORGIA 



IT 



ADVANCED STUDENTS 



A 

Adams, Charles 

i; 
Barragan, Frank 
Bowyer, H. L 
Ho> il, Helen 
Breland, Woodrovt 
Brennan, Helen — Honor Grad. 
from St. Vincent's Academy 

Brennan, James 
Brooks, Pape 



Carr, Thomas 
Coffey, Francis 
Cook, Charles 
Cook, Gerald 
Cook, Marieta 
Cranman, Arthur 
Cronk, Jack 



de Valinger, Wesley 

Dreese, Stockton 

DuPont, John 

DuPuis, Alma Wood — Honor Grod. 
from Hardeeville, S. C. 

Durant, Ruth 



rj . Jean 

Gamble, Adaline Honor Grod. 
from Ho ni, i/, /'. 

H 
Uardwick, Wendell 

Harmon, I toralea 

Hausmann, Martha 

Hill, Georgia Anna 

Hipson, Jeanne 

Hollis, Ruby — Honor (inn/. 

from Savannah High 
Holloway, Ann 
Hood, Elizabeth 
Horswell, Richard 
Housholder, Nedra 
Hutchins, Claudine 



Jenkins, Gere — Honor Grod. 

from Savannah High 
Johnson, Dorothy — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 

K 
Karpf, Isadore 
Keever, Rachel 
Ketchum, Adele 
Kolman, Florence 
Kravitch, Roslyn 



Everett, Juanita 



Fonseca, Frank 
Futral, Virginia 

Freeman, Samuel — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 



Givens, Louis 

Goette, Mary B.— Honor Grad. 

from St. Vincent's Academy 
Gould, Emily 



LaMotte, Irene 
Leon, Lettye 
Lynes, Betty 

M 

McLaughlin, John — Honor Grad. 

from Benedictine M. S. 
MacLeod, Isabel — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
MacLeod, Jeanette 
McRae, Rita 
Miller, Elizabeth — Honor Grad. 

from SavannaJi High 
Miller, Robert 
Monsees, Geraldine 



48 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



ADVANCED STUDENTS— (Continued) 



N 



Nathan, Evelyn 

Nelson, Dorothy — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

Norton, Elizabeth, M. — Honor 
Grad. from Erie, Penn. 

O 

Orr, Sibyl — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 



Patrick, George 
Phillips, Arthur 
Pierce, Elizabeth 
Pittman, Mildred 
Powers, Eleanore 
Purse, Walton 

R 
Rawlings, Margaret 
Rice, William B. — Honor Grad. 

from Allendale, S. C. 
Richard, Douglass 
Riddle, William 



R 

Roberts, Julia 
Rubin, Saul 



Salter, Caroline 
Sanders, Frank 
Segall, Regina 
Seyle, Charles 
Smith, Henry C. 
Solms, Selma 
Stokes, Thomas 



Thomas, Miriam 

Traub, Josephine — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Tyre, John 

W 

Waite, Nelson 
Waldhour, Ardelle 
Wallace, Elizabeth 
Warner, Isabel 
Williams, Bette 
Wilson, Andrew 
Woodward, Rupert 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Douglas, Anne 
Holliman, Evalina 



Rossiter, James 
Rowland, Mary 



() 1- 



S A V A \ \ V II 



GEORGIA 



19 



FIRST VKAK STUDKNTS 



Anderson, Andrew 

Aranda. [mogene 

Arnau, Mainline 

B 

Bainbridge, Hetty 

Ball, Carolyn 

Barbee, Gertrude — Honor Grad. 
from St. Vincent's Academy 

Barnes, Laurene 
Barry, Florine 
Berry, Bernice 
Blackwell, Martha 
Bland, Lillie Mae 
Blitch, Wilder 
Bowyer, Morehouse 
Boyce, Mary 
Boyd, Arthur 
Brady, Kenneth 
Brannen, William 
Brogdon, Cecil 
Brown, Thomas 
Brushwood, Chester 
Bumann, Virginia 
Burke, Marguerite 
Burt, Robert 
Bythewood, Anna Lu 



Campbell, Decatur 
Carmichael, Edward 
Cason, Elise 
Chapman, Horace 
Clark, A. R. 
Clark, Nell 
Cohen, Rhoda 
Cooley, John 
Cooper, Max 
Cornell, Lucile 
Cowan, Mary 
Cribb, Luther 
Crisfield, Mary 
Crosby, Jayne 



I) 
Dasher, Dolores 

Davis, .Joseph 

Davis, Robert 
DeLoach, Robert 

Dodd, Elizabeth 
Douglas, B. L. 
Draughon, Myrtice — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Ducey, Martha 
Dutton, Margaret 

E 
Edwards, Anita 



Falk, Doris — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 
Fennell, Anita 
Feuger, Edwin 
Fountain, Andrew 
Fox, Sarah 
Fries, George 



Gamble, Anne 
Gardner, John 
Gibson, Louise 
Glass, William 
Googe, Henrietta 
Grantham, Lyndell 
Guest, William 
Guill, Ann 

H 

Hagan, Jack — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 
Hall, I. B. 
Harms, Lucy 
Hart, George 
Hartnett, Maurice 
Hearn, William 
Helmken, Maree 
Heyman, Jeanette 
Hodges, Geneva 
Hoagland, Catherine 



60 



A R M STRONG JUNIOR C L L E G E 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS (Continued) 



11 



Hornstein, Albert 
Humphrey, Clarissa 
Hyrne, Jonathan 

I 
Irby, Eleanor 
[zlar, Mildred 



M 
Moore, Violet 

Morgan, Caryl — Honor Grad. 
from Springfield, Georgia 

Morrow, Richard 
Mulling. Jack 



N 



Nichols, Fenwick 



Jewell, Corinna 

K 

Karp, Frances 
Kaufmann, Caroline 
Keeling, Martha Lois 
Kiley, Melvin 
Kleeman, Veronica 
Knowlton, Richard 
Kravitch, Phyllis 



Laffiteau, Charles 
Laird, Jean 
Lamas, Andrew 
Lamas, Joaquin 
Lang, Aaron 
Leaptrott, Jane 
Lee, Wright 
Lester, Palmer 
Lloyd, William 
Longwater, Leon 
Lopez, Benjamin 
Lynch, Samuel 

M 

MacFeeley, Constance — Honor 

Grad. from Savannah HigJi 
Mclsaac, Margaret 
Mclver, Julia 
Mallory, Mildred — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah Higfi 
Michels, Julian 
Miller, William — Honor Grad. 

from Pembroke, Georgia 
Minchew, Willene — Honor Grad. 

from Way cross, Georgia 



Parr, Jack — Honor Grad. 

from Cedartown, Georgia 
Peterson, George 
Pfeiffer, Louis — Honor Grad. 

from. Sylvania, Georgia 
Phail, James 
Poppell, Allen 
Potts, Irwin 
Price, Thomas 
Puckett, Lawrence 



Ralston, John 

Reed, James 

Reed, Lois 

Rhodes, Dorothy 

Richardson, Horton 

Richardson, Mildred 

Richman, Joseph 

Rolison, Estelle 

Rosenzweig, Lillian — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah Higli 
Rossiter, Jule 
Rovall, Katherine 



Sallette, Laura — Honor Grad. 

from Ludoicici, Georgia 
Sampson, Dorothy 
Schwarz, Robert 
Scott, William 
Sharpley, Helen — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah HigJt 
Sheppard, Marian 
Simmons, Mary 



() F S A V A N N A 11 



G E R G 1 A 



61 



FlKST YFAR STUDENTS (Continued) 



Simpson, John 

Smith, Bvelyeen 

Smith, Allan 
Solomons, McMillan 
Solomons, Philip 
Stevens, Elizabeth 
Stevens, Thomas 
Stoughton, Owen 
Sullivan, Marv 



Tabb, Katherine 

Tietjen, Eleanor 

Tootle, Talmadge 

Tregone, Frances — Honor Grad. 

from Monroe, Georgia 
Turner, Leslie — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Tyre, Donell 



U 
Urquhart, Nancy 

w 

Waldrop, Charles 

Walsh, Thomas—Honor Grad, 

from I>< m dictine M. S. 

Waters, Juanita 
Weitmon, Ethelda 
Wetherhorn, David 
Willcox, Margaret 
Williams, Elizabeth 
Wimberly, Olin — Honor Grad. 
from Brunswick, Georgia 
Woodward, James 
Wootton, Amelia 



Youmans, Mary 

Z 

Zittrouer, Randall 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



•. iff \*Q : 



BULLETlKiDF 



M vh 






lo^Oiioiin 



ppotfed Jjui 









Volume I 



- •■ . „ 



H 



1 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 









1939-1940 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 

A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




1 8-334 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



LIBRARY 



CALENDAR 1939—1940 



Fall Quarter 

Explanation of courses to freshmen 

10. A. M. Auditorium . Wednesday, September 20 
Physical Examination freshmen .... September 20 

Freshman registration September 20 

Freshman preliminary 

tests .... Thursday-Friday, September 21-22 
Upperclassman registration and 

physical examination . . . Friday, September 22 

Opening exercises Monday, September 25 

All classes begin September 25 

Test Friday, October 20 

Armistice Day address .... Friday, November 10 

Mid-term test Wednesday, November 24 

Thanksgiving 

holidays . . . Thursday-Friday, Nov. 30-Dec. 1 
Examinations . . Thursday-Tuesday, December 14-19 
Christmas holidays .... December 20-January 1 



Winter Quarter 

Registration Tuesday, January 2 

All classes begin Wednesday, January 3 

Institute of Citizenship . Thursday-Friday, February 1-2 

Mid-term test Friday, February 9 

Examinations . . . Tuesday-Thursday, March 12-14 
Spring holidays . . . Friday-Tuesday, March 15-19 

Spring Quarter 

Registration Wednesday, March 20 

All classes begin Thursday, March 21 

Mid-term test Friday, April 19 

Examinations Monday-Thursday, June 3-6 

President's reception Friday, June 7 

Graduation exercises Monday, June 10 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

(it neral Information i- .,,,,. 

College Commission 7 

Faculty 7 

History, Organisation, and Aims 9 

Library 10 

Laboratories 11 

College Book store 11 

Gifts to the College 12 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 13 

Requirements for Admission 14 

Fees and Refunds 15 

Enrollment Procedure 10 

Testing and Guidance 17 

Student Load 17 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 18 

Explanation of Course Credit 18 

Transfers from Other Institutions 18 

Transfers to Other Institutions 18 

Reports and Grades 18 

Honor Points 19 

Honors 19 

Exchange Club Medal 20 

Perelstine Award 20 

Co-operation with Examiner of University System of Georgia . 20 

Final Examinations 21 

Repetition of a Course 21 

Attendance Regulations 21 

Rules on Personal Conduct 22 

Withdrawals 22 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 22 

Number Required in Courses 22 

Student Activities 22 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations 23 

College Organizations, Lectures, and Concerts 24 

The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship .... 24 

Student Publications 25 

The Savannah Playhouse 25 

Holidays 25 

Adult Education 25 



6 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) 

Courses of Study p 

Certificates Granted 2G 

Genera] Requirements for Graduation 26 

Liberal Arts 26 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Liberal Arts .... 27 

Home Economics 28 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Home Economics ... 28 

Finance and Commerce 29 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Finance and Commerce . 30 

Course Descriptions 

Division of Languages 31 

English 31 

Humanities 32 

Art 33 

French 33 

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 34 

Biological Sciences 34 

Physical Sciences 35 

Mathematics 36 

Division of Social Sciences 37 

History 37 

Political Science 38 

Economics 38 

Psychology 38 

Sociology 38 

Division of Finance and Commerce 39 

Division of Home Economics 41 

Courses in Physical Education and Library Economics ... 42 

Graduates, 1938 43 

Students Enrolled Year 1938-1939 43 

Advanced Students 44 

First Year Students 46 



F S A V A N N A H , G E R G I A 



THE COLLEGE commission 

Robert If. Hitch Chairman 

Herschel V. Jenkins Vice-Chairman 

Henry Bli n. Ex officio Mrs. Mills B. Lane 

Michael .J. Egan Mrs. Charles d. Russell 

Thomas Gamble, Ex officio I. A. Solomons, Jk. 



THE FACULTY 

Ernest A. Lowe, B.S.C President 

J. Thomas Askew, Fh.B., m.a. . . . Dean 
and Instructor in Social Sciences 

John P. Dyer, B.A., Bryson College; M.A., Peabody College; Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University. 

Instructor in Social Sciences. 

PRANCES Ennis, B.S.H.E., Georgia State College for Women; M.A. in 
Household Arts Education, Columbia University. 

Instructor in Home Economics. 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B. and M.A., University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., Mercer University; M.S., Emory University. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

Lulie Henderson, A.B. in Education, University of Georgia; A.B. in 
Library Science, Emory University. 

Librarian. 

Reuben W. Holland, A.B. and M.A., Emory University. 

Instructor in Romance Languages and Treasurer. 

Andrew L. Ingles, A.B., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., University of Virginia. 
Instructor in Biology. 

Stacy Reach, B.S. and M.A., Northwestern University. 
Instructor in English. 

Arthur Kolgaklis, B.S.C, Georgia School of Technology; M.B.A., Har- 
vard University. 

Instructor in Commerce. 



8 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

John W. McNeill, B.S.C., and M.A., Ohio State University. 
Instructor in Finance and Commerce, 

Ivey M. Shiver, B.S.C., University of Georgia. 

Director of Athletics and Physical Education. 

Margaret FOBTSON Stephens, A.B., LL.B., and M.A., University of 
Georgia; Certificat, La Sorbonne, Paris. 

Instructor in English, 

Nelta Beckett, Associate in Liberal Arts, Armstrong Junior College. 
Secretary. 



OF S A V A N N A H , G E R G I A 9 

HISTORY, ORGANIZATION, AND AIMS 
For the past IV\\ yean, Savannah and the surrounding 

community have felt the need for an institution of higher 
learning. Realizing that there is an increasing number of 
young men and women who find it inconvenient or inad- 
visable to continue their education at out-of-town colleges, 
Mayor Thomas Gamble and a group of leading citizens 
conceived the idea of establishing a junior college in 
Savannah. These men, working tirelessly over a period of 
months, finally saw their hopes become an actuality when 
on May 27, 1935, the city council authorized the establish- 
ment of a municipally supported junior college to be 
governed temporarily by a commission of fourteen members 
appointed by the mayor. The first commission was com- 
posed of the following leading Savannah citizens: Chair- 
man, A. Pratt Adams; Vice-Chairman, Thomas Gamble; 
Henry Blun, H. L. Fulton, H. M. Garwes, H. F. Gibbons, 
H. V. Jenkins, H. L. Kayton, Mrs. Mills B. Lane, A. B. 
Lovett, Frank W. Spencer, O. B. Strong, Mrs. Lucy B. 
Trosdal, Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 General 
Assembly the size of the commission was reduced to eight 
including the Mayor and Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education as ex officio members. The day before 
the ordinance creating the college w r as passed, Mayor 
Gamble announced that the problem of housing the new 
school w T as solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz and her 
daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously pre- 
sented their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. 
Armstrong, their husband and father, respectively. Due to 
the many spacious rooms, remarkably few changes were 
necessary to fit the building for college purposes. The Arm- 
strong building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, is one 
of the most beautiful and expensive college buildings in 
the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded 
the Lucas Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in 
founding the Junior College. In his speech of acceptance 
Mr. Gamble announced that he had received the gift of a 



1" ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house classes in finance 
and commerce, the building to be named in honor of the 
donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings 
is the auditorium and recreation building erected and 
equipped by the city of Savannah and the federal govern- 
ment at a cost of $70, 000. All three buildings, standing 
side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park 
in the city, which consists of forty acres and is used by 
Armstrong students for recreational purposes. The Georgia 
Historical Society library, to which the students have access, 
faces the park and lies just across Whitaker street from 
the College buildings. 

In the Fall of 1937 the heirs of General and Mrs. 
Alexander R. Lawton gave the handsome Lawton Memorial 
auditorium to the City of Savannah for the use and benefit 
of Armstrong Junior College and of the people of Savan- 
nah. 

Under the will of the late Carrie Colding the Colding 
residence on Jones Street was conveyed to the College. 
This property has been sold and the proceeds are being 
held by the Court pending a construction of the will by 
the Courts. 

The Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah 
and the adjacent community by giving to the young men 
and women who attend its classes an understanding of the 
world in which they live and an appreciation of the best 
that has been achieved by western civilization. Its graduates 
are equipped to continue their studies in the junior class 
of a senior college ; but for those who do not desire to 
pursue their work elsewhere, terminal work is offered. The 
College attempts to provide its students with a keener reali- 
zation of the duties and responsibilities of citizenship and 
a broader conception of the world and its problems. 

Library 

The College library and reading rooms are located on 
the first floor of the Armstrong building. The furniture is 



o P S A V A \ N A II . GEORGIA 11 

walnut, finished to blend with the walnut paneled room. 
The capacity of the two reading rooms is adequate to 
one-fourth o( the student body. 

In addition to the College library, the students have 
access to the Savannah Public Library and the Library of 
the Georgia Historical Society, which is one-half block from 
the Junior College. These libraries cooperate in supplying 
not only genera] reading matter but also books especially 
used in the courses of study. 

The aim of the library is to meet the demands of junior 
college students by providing material necessary to a more 
complete understanding of their studies and to stimulate 
their interest and enjoyment in recreational reading from 
the best of the older and modern writers. A course in the 
facilities and use of the library is required of all students. 
This provides a better understanding of books and a more 
intelligent use of the library. 

The library is under the care of a trained librarian and 
student assistants. It is open thirteen hours each day of 
the week, with the exception of Sunday, when the library 
is closed. 

Laboratories 

Laboratories for chemistry and biology form an im- 
portant part of the instructional equipment of this insti- 
tution. Both laboratories are well equipped with facilities 
for handling sections of twenty students. In addition to 
the regular laboratory in biology, class demonstrations pro- 
vide indispensable aids in the teaching of human biology. A 
museum is being established which will furnish examples 
of many marine as well as inland forms of plants and 
animals. 

The College Book Store 

A book store is provided for the convenience of the 
students. Textbooks and classroom supplies are available 
at cost plus a minimum charge for handling. 






12 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Gifts to the College 

No college was ever more fortunate in having good 
friends who have in so many instances satisfied needs of 
the institution through substantial gifts. This is truly a city 
college; scores of Savannah citizens have contributed in 
some way to its establishment. 

Soon after it was known that the College would open 
in September, Mr. Boykin Paschal, president of the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, volunteered the services of that 
organization in the collection of books for the library. At 
the call of this group of progressive business and pro- 
fessional men, hundreds of Savannahians contributed books 
from their private libraries. Some two thousand volumes 
were delivered to the College by the Junior Chamber. 
Through their efforts, these gentlemen gave the College a 
collection which will be of permanent value. 

Mrs. B. F. Bullard, for many years a friend of education 
in this state, gave the College fifty volumes selected from 
her library and $200 with which to buy books and stage 
equipment. 

During the winter of 1935 Mr. Mills B. Lane, an out- 
standing Savannah citizen, purchased the home of Judge 
George T. Cann adjoining the College property, and pre- 
sented it to the Commission to be used to house classes in 
finance and commerce. This gift, with the exception of the 
gift of the original college building by Mrs. Lucy M. C. 
Moltz and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, is the 
largest that has thus far been made. 

An auditorium and class room building was built in 
1936 by the federal government and the city of Savannah 
at a cost of $70,000. It has been in use since September, 
1936. 

The handsome Lawton Memorial auditorium building 
on Bull Street was given to the City of Savannah for the 
use of the Armstrong Junior College and the people of 
Savannah by the heirs of General and Mrs. Alexander R. 
Lawton in the Fall of 1937. 



OF SAVANNAH, G E R G 1 A 13 

By bequest the Colding residence on Jones Street was 
given the College in l i > - > T . Under the will of the late Carrie 
Colding this property, or the proceeds from it, an- to be 
used by the College in any way the Commission may direct. 

This property has been sold but the estate will nut be 
settled until the Courts have given an interpretation of 

the will. 

Two friends of the College, both desiring to remain 
anonymous, have made contributions valued at $2,000 each. 
One gilt was for the purpose of making in the auditorium 
certain changes which will greatly increase the usefulness 
of the stage ; the second gift was several hundred very 
valuable and useful books. 

In acknowledging gifts, the College wishes to express 
appreciation of the many books and periodicals presented 
by Mr. Thomas Gamble. Mr. Gamble is a frequent visitor 
at the College and he seldom comes without bringing one 
or more carefully selected volumes for the library. 

These gifts, and those of scores of other loyal friends 
whose names cannot be mentioned in the short space pro- 
vided in this bulletin, represent substantial contributions 
to the development of the College. The administration, 
faculty, and students wish to express their appreciation. 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

Since the establishment of the College, Savannah 
citizens and organizations have been extremely generous, 
in providing scholarship and loan funds for those students 
needing financial assistance. In addition to scholarships pro- 
vided locally, the National Youth Administration last year 
aided many students. This assistance has been extremely 
valuable to the College as it has been possible to use student 
talent in the several departments where help is needed. 

Six scholarships of one hundred dollars each, to cover 
registration fees for one year, are awarded by the Junior 
College to the six students ranking highest in scholarship 
tests given at the College in May of each year. Applicants 
must be residents of Savannah and rank in the upper one- 
third of their high school graduating class in scholarship. 



14 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Students desiring aid may make application direct to the 
officers of the organizations listed below or to Professor 
Arthur Gignilliat, who is in charge of this work for the 
College. Application blanks may be obtained from Mr. 
Gignilliat. 

The organizations and individuals who have provided 
student aid through the past three years are: 

National Youth Administration 

B. H. Levy Brother and Company 

Business & Professional Women's Club 

Federation of Women's Clubs 

Pilot Club 

Pilot's Association 

Landrum Lodge 

Friedmans' Jewelers 

Woman's Club of Jewish Alliance 

Pan Hellenic Association 

Savannah Rotary Club 

Mrs. Joseph-Brooks Abrams 

Harmonie Club 

Requirements for Admission 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior 
College must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school with sixteen units of credit. 

2. A general average of all high school work amount- 
ing to five points above the passing grade, when 
figures are used, or one step above passing, when 
letters are used, will be required. 

3. The following specific requirements must also be 
met : 

A. Eight constants — 3 units in English, 2 units in 
social studies, 2 units in mathematics (1 must be 
in algebra), and 1 unit in science. 

B. Eight electives — 4 of these electives must be from 
the following subjects: English, social studies, 



i) p SAVANNAH, GEORGIA L6 

mathematics, science, and foreign language. Four 
units may be from the vocational and avocational 
groups. 
A record of high school credits earned by the applicant 

should he made out on the proper forms by a competent 
official of the high school and mailed directly to the office 
of the Dean. This certificate becomes the property of the 
Junior College and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

Fees and Refunds 

Fees in Armstrong Junior College, including registra- 
tion fee, and a $5.00 student activity fee, will amount to 
a total of $105 for the year for resident and non-resident 
students alike, payable $35 upon entrance in September, 
$35 at the beginning of the second quarter in January, and 
$35 at the beginning of the third quarter in March. The 
student activity fee will include a subscription to The Ink- 
well, the College newspaper, one copy of the College 
annual, and entrance to some of the athletic contests. 

Students taking science courses with laboratory work 
will be required to pay a small fee which is indicated in the 
description of the science courses found under "Courses of 
Instruction" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Fall - - $35.00 Registration fee 
Winter - $35.00 Registration fee 
Spring - $35.00 Registration fee 



$105.00 Total 
Laboratory fees additional. 

Special students will be admitted only by permission of 
the Dean. For less than three ccfurses in any one quarter 
the charge will be $15.00 for each course. 

A late registration fee of $5.00 will be charged any 
students who fail to register and pay tuition fees on the day 
designated for registration at the beginning of each quarter, 
unless excused because of sickness. 



16 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Iii afternoon and evening classes a fee of $8.00 will be 
charged for one-half course and $15.00 for one course, 
the maximum number of evening courses allowed for any 
one quarter. This rate applies to the courses taken within 
one quarter only. A course includes three eighty-five 
minute lecture periods each week. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a 
quarter will receive a refund of one-half of the registration 
fee. No refunds will be made after the first thirty days of a 
term, and no refunds will be made to those dismissed from 
College. 

Enrollment Procedure 

Schedule of physical examinations for all first year 
students will be arranged September 20, and registration 
of freshmen will be completed on September 20. No student 
will be permitted to register unless a transcript showing 
all high school and college credits earned is in the hands of 
the Dean. Considerable delay and perhaps expense may be 
avoided by attending to this matter at least one month be- 
fore school opens. 

Any freshman permitted to register after September 20 
will be charged a late registration fee of $5.00. Registra- 
tion includes the payment of fees to the Treasurer. 

All freshmen applicants must register in person and 
follow this procedure : 

1. Introduction of members of the faculty and ex- 
planation of courses at 10 A. M., September 20, in 
the College Auditorium. 

2. Physical examinations will be scheduled between 
the hours of 11 A. M. and 4 P. M., September 20. 

3. Registration in the Auditorium, September 20. 

4. Payment of all fees in the Treasurer's office, Septem- 
ber 20. This may be done any time between the 
hours of 11:00 and 5:00. 



o r s \ V A NN A H , GEORGIA 11 

5. Thursday and Friday, September 21 and :i:i will be 
devoted to preliminary tests, which will be required 
of all freshmen without any exceptions. Tests are 
scheduled to begin at ( .>:<h) a. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

Registration, payment of fees, and schedule for physical 
examination oi' upperclassmen will be completed on Septem- 
ber 22. Any upperclassman permitted to register or pay 
fees after that date will he charged a late registration fee 
of {5.00. 

Testing and Guidance 

The College feels that it can render a most important 
service to the student by helping him find that vocation or 
profession where he can realize the most satisfaction and 
success in life. With this in mind a committee of testing 
and guidance has been set up through which the student 
may receive sound advice on his personal and vocational 
problems. This committee studies the individual student and 
tries to discover his aptitudes and abilities. The information 
thus obtained is utilized by the entire faculty. 

In order that the College may have the necessary in- 
formation upon which to build a satisfactory guidance 
program, all students are required to take a series of tests 
before entrance requirements are fulfilled and registration 
completed. All students are required to take a physical 
examination which is administered by the College in con- 
junction with the City Health Department. A student who 
can not take the examination at the appointed time will 
be given an examination at a later date and charged a fee 
of two dollars. The physical condition of each student is 
studied, and recommendations made where such are neces- 
sary. 

Student Load 

A normal load is three and one-third courses each 
quarter, and students will be required to carry this amount 
of work unless special arrangements are made with the 
Dean. A student must pass nine courses before he will 
be ranked as a sophomore. 



18 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Students who make two A's and have no grades below 
B for any one quarter may carry an additional course or a 
maximum of four and one-third courses for the subsequent 
quarter. 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 

Permission of the Dean is necessary to drop a subject 
or to transfer from one subject or section to another. 

Explarmtion of Course Credit 

The school year lasts nine months and is divided into 
three quarters, Fall, Winter, and Spring. A course includes 
five fifty-five minute lecture periods per week for one 
quarter. A course is 5 quarter hours or 3 13 semester 
hours. 

Transfers from other Institutions 

No student will be accepted from another college with- 
out a transcript of college work from that institution, and 
no student may enroll in Armstrong Junior College who has 
been dropped from another institution or who is on pro- 
bation from another institution because of poor scholarship. 

A student transferring to Armstrong Junior College will 
have his credits reduced unless at least three-fourths of 
all grades received at another college are above the lowest 
passing grade of that college. If courses amounting to one- 
half a normal load are not passed with grades above the 
lowest passing grade, a transfer student will not be ac- 
cepted. 

Transfers to other Institutions 

No student will be recommended for transfer to other 
institutions unless three-fourths of all grades received at 
Armstrong are above D. 

Reports and Grades 

Reports of grades will be sent the student at the end 
cf each quarter. While the College feels that its dealings 
should be directlv with the student, parents are urged to 






OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA L9 

inform themselves as to the student's progress and to dis- 
cuss these reports with him. Student records in the Office 
of the Dean are, of course, always open to parents. 

Grade A plus, Exceptional 1 honor points per 

course 

Grade A, Superior 3 honor points per 

course 

Grade B, Better than average 2 honor points per 

course 

Grade C, Average 1 honor point per 

course 

Grade D, Barely passing honor points per 

course 

Grade E, Incomplete Minus 1 honor point 

per course 

Grade F, Failure Minus 1 honor point 

per course 

Grade E (Incomplete) — An incomplete may be removed 
by means stipulated by the instructor of the course in which 
the student received the grade E. An E not removed in 
the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an F. 

Honor Points 

The number of honor points a student receives is deter- 
mined by the grades he makes, each grade carrying a 
certain number of honor points, as explained above. In 
order to graduate, a student must receive as many honor 
points, based upon the above grading system, as the num- 
ber of courses required for graduation, and as many honor 
points as courses taken by the student. 

Honors 

Students who maintain an average of B or above in 
each course during a quarter's work will be placed on the 
Dean's Scholastic Attainment List. At the discretion of the 
Dean, special absence privileges may be granted to these 
students. 



20 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The 20$ of (1) advanced students and (2) students 
with less than six quarters work who have the highest 
averages, provided this average is "B" or better, and have 
failed no courses, will be given special recognition on 
Honors Day. 

Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction) will be 
bestowed upon those receiving an average of 3 honor points 
per course. 

A valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class 
from among the five students with the highest scholastic 
average in the work completed before the term in which 
the students graduate. 

All students who receive recognition on Honors Day 
will have their names recorded on a permanent Dean's List 
in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. 

Exchange Club Medal 

The Exchange Club of the city of Savannah presents 
a handsome medallion to the student who makes the highest 
grade in the course on Contemporary Georgia. 

Perelstine Award 

Mr. Joseph Perelstine, prominent Savannah business 
man, makes an annual award to the senior student in Com- 
merce who achieves the highest scholastic average. The 
award is made on Honors Day. 

Cooperation with the Examiner of the 
University System of Georgia 

The University System of Georgia has inaugurated in 
certain courses a uniform examination plan under the super- 
vision of a trained technician. A number of these courses 
are offered by Armstrong Junior College. With the per- 
mission of the Examiner and the administration of the 
University System of Georgia, Armstrong has been per- 
mitted to cooperate in this testing program. 



OF SAVANNAH. GEORGIA 21 

Final Examinations 

1. Regular written examinations are required in all 
courses at the end of each quarter. These examinations arc 
held on the last three or four days of the quarter, in ac- 
cordance with a permanent schedule. 

2. Final examinations, except in laboratory practice, 
arc limited to a period of three hours. In courses in which 
a considerable portion of the examination is of a practical 
nature, the instructor may extend the time at his discretion. 

3. Special examinations for students who have been 
officially excused from regular examinations may be held 
at suitable times fixed by the instructors concerned. Such 
examinations must be taken within the succeeding quarter, 
and a fee of $1.00 will be assessed for each examination. 

Repetition of a Course 

A student who fails in not more than one course during 
a quarter may repeat the same subject in addition to carry- 
ing a normal load of three and one-third courses in a sub- 
sequent quarter if work is generally satisfactory. Per- 
mission of the Dean is necessary and a fee of $1.00 will be 
charged. 

Attendance Regulations 

Students are allowed three unexcused absences per 
course. Excess absences must be satisfactorily explained to 
the instructor in charge of the course or to the Dean, if class 
work is to continue. Special faculty action will be required 
before a student may receive credit on a course from which 
he has been absent eight or more times. 

Upon request, special absence privileges may be granted 
a student who is on the Dean's List, but the granting of such 
privileges is within the discretion of the Dean. 

A student who is absent from any class two days be- 
fore or after a holiday or the beginning or ending of a term 
will be assessed $1.00 for each day or part of a day absent. 



22 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Rules on Personal Conduct 

Students are requested to maintain high standards of 
personal conduct and character. 

Withdrawal* 

A formal withdrawal, presented in writing to the Dean, 
is a prerequisite to honorable dismissal or re-entrance to this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should im- 
mediately make such intentions known to the President. 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 

All students failing (except in cases excused before 
examinations on account of sickness) to pass at least one 
course other than physical education in any one quarter 
will be dropped from the rolls of the College. All students 
who fail to make an average of at least five honor points 
(not more than one honor point will be counted in this 
reckoning for physical education) during the first three 
quarters' work at the Junior College will not be allowed 
to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students 
with less than a "C" average at the end of the fourth 
quarter of college work, and at the end of the sixth quarter 
of college work a student must have an average of three- 
fourths an honor point per course in order to re-register. 

Number Required in Courses 

Unless at least fifteen students register for the course 
no course will be given without special action of the Dean. 

Student Activities 

Believing that self-discipline by the individual student 
has educational value, the faculty has endeavored to create 
an atmosphere of freedom around the College. The students 
have been free to form scholarly habits, to develop indi- 
vidual abilities and to practice self-restraint in a manner 
becoming adults. In keeping with this policy, which has 
been very successful so far, the faculty will place the same 






OF S A V A X X A 11 , GEORGIA 

responsibilities upon and give the Bame freedom to in- 
coming freshmen. The faculty is unalterably opposed to 
hazing in any form. 

The College faculty and students will hold a scries of 
closed dances throughout the year. 

The President and faculty will provide regulations for 
student organizations. Any student group desiring to hold 

any public meeting or social event in the name of the 
College or in the name of the student organizations must 
notify the Committee on Student Activities two weeks in ad- 
vance of the meeting and find a place on the calendar kept 
in the President's office. 

Regulations Governing Soeicil Organizations 

1. Any group of students desiring to organize a social 
club must submit to the Faculty Committee on Student Ac- 
tivities a petition for a charter. This petition should contain 
the following information : 

(1) Name of the proposed organization 

(2) Aims and purposes of the organization 

(3) Proposed regulations governing membership, 
initiation, and dues 

(4) Plan of organization 

(5) Proposed time and place of meeting 

(6) Name of proposed sponsor 

(7) Names of proposed members. 

2. No student may become a member of any social 
organization unless he or she has earned at least four honor 
points at Armstrong in the quarter preceding initiation. A 
student who has not earned the required number of honor 
points, but who has an average of "C" on three academic 
courses at mid-term, may, however, be pledged as a pros- 
pective member but may not enjoy full privileges of mem- 
bership until after formal initiation. 

3. No student shall be pledged as a prospective mem- 
ber of any social organization before the mid-term reports 
of his or her first quarter at Armstrong. 



24 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

4. All invitations to membership should be in writing. 
The invitation should be accepted or declined, in writing, 
within three days of the date upon which it is received. 
The reply to the invitation should be addressed to the 
Chairman of the Faculty Committee on Student Activities 
who will notify the organization and keep the replies on file. 

5. Any student organization desiring to give an enter- 
tainment shall notify the Chairman of the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Student Activities of such proposed entertainment 
at least two weeks in advance, stating, in writing, the nature 
of the entertainment, the time and place, and the chaperons 
to be invited. 

6. The sponsor of a social organization should not be 
a member of the faculty of the college. 

College Organizations, Lectures, and Concerts 

The College sponsors a glee club, an orchestra, a council 
on foreign affairs, and dramatics. During the year these 
organizations present programs at student assemblies and, 
occasionally, to the public. All students showing ability 
and interest are eligible for membership in these organi- 
zations. 

Students of Armstrong are provided unusual opportuni- 
ties to hear some of the best lecturers in America as well as 
concert artists of ability. Through a special arrangement 
with the Savannah Community Forum, students of the 
College are permitted to attend six lectures during the fall 
and winter for the small fee of $1.00. These lectures are 
given in the college auditorium. 

The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship 

The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship was 
organized in January, 1939, as a college-community co- 
operative enterprise. The first institute was held on Febru- 
ary 2-3, 1939, and was open to the students and public 
without charge. A number of out-of-town speakers will ap- 
pear on future programs. The object of the Institute is to 
promote better citizenship. 



o F S A V ANN A H , GEORGIA 25 

Student Publications 

The official organ of the student body is the Inkwell and 
is published once a month. The Geechee is the College year 

book. 

The Savannah Playhouse 

The Savannah Playhouse of Armstrong Junior College 
was founded in 1936 Tor the purpose of emphasizing the 

study of speech and of serving the student body and com- 
munity in the held of the drama and its allied arts. The 
playhouse thus provides opportunity for one to enrich his 
background in the drama and to participate in stage pro- 
ductions. 

It is the aim of this theatre to produce from time to 
time various forms of the drama which are worthy of the 
experimental theatre. 

Student experience in the many phases of the work of 
the Playhouse not only constitutes foundation work for ad- 
vanced study in the field, but develops a confidence in one's 
ability to think and speak correctly. 

Holidays 

The College calendar provides for holidays only at 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and in the spring. One additional 
holiday will be granted w^hen the faculty attends the meet- 
ing of the Georgia Education Association. Although the 
school will not suspend classes for other occasions, students 
desiring to recognize religious holidays may do so, and a 
limited number of absences is allowed for such occasions. 

Adult Education 

The College will offer afternoon or evening classes for 
adults. The same number of hours will be spent in these 
classes as is spent in those on the regular schedule. 



26 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Certificates G rani < d 

The College will offer work leading to three different 
certificates: Associate in Liberal Arts, Associate in Home 
Economics, and Associate in Finance and Commerce. Ap- 
plications for these certificates must be filed in the office 
of the Dean by April 1st. 

General Requirements for Graduation 

1. In order to graduate a candidate must have to his 
credit as many honor points as the number of courses re- 
quired for graduation and as many honor points as the 
number of courses completed. (For an explanation of honor 
points, see "Honor Points," page 19.) 

2. A brief non-credit course in library science, a study 
of the use of books and the library, is required of all first- 
year students during the first quarter. A detailed descrip- 
tion of this course is found on page 42. 

3. Not more than ten courses (33 1 3 semester hours) 
will be accepted from another institution toward the com- 
pletion of work on a certificate, and all transfer students 
must remain in residence for nine consecutive months, re- 
gardless of the number of credits received elsewhere. Under 
all circumstances the student must attend the Junior College 
during the last quarter when work is completed on a 
certificate. 

4. A student transferring to Armstrong will have his 
credits reduced if more than one-fourth of all grades re- 
ceived at another college are the lowest passing grade in 
that college. 

Liberal Arts 

The Liberal Arts course is designed for those students 
who desire a broad educational background ; it is concerned 
with man and with the achievements of civilization. The 



OF S A V A N N A 11 , G E o R G 1 A 27 

COUrse deals With man's natural, social, and cultural history 

and seeks to Rive the student an understanding of the past 
and its relationship to the present. 

When he has completed the course, the student is ex- 
pected to have some knowledge of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of natural science, of the great movements which 
have directed the course of civilization, and of the artistic 
and literary masterpieces of the world. The student is then 
ready to specialize in any field he chooses — natural or 
social science, literature, art or commerce. If, however, the 
student does not expect to continue his education further 
in college, he is ready to go into his life's work better able 
to understand and to see in their proper relationships the 
problems of life and of society, and to appreciate more fully 
man's achievements and aspirations. 

By a proper selection of electives, liberal arts students 
may prepare themselves for the technical and professional 
courses in senior colleges. Correspondence with the senior 
college concerned should be undertaken by the student in 
planning such a course of study. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Liberal Arts 

Social Science . . 2, 3 2 courses 

Biology 2 courses 

Humanities . . . 1-2 (or 2 courses 

in English) . . 2 courses 

English .... 11-12 2 courses 

Foreign Language * 2 courses 

Mathematics 1 course 

Political Science . 12 (or Social 

Science 4) . . 1 course 

Physical Education 2 courses 

Total specified 14 courses 

Electives 6 courses 

Total for graduation 20 courses 

* Students who have had two high school units in French must 
schedule French 3-4. Those students offering three units must 
schedule two of the following: French 4, 5, 6. 



28 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Home Economics 

In view of the fact that an appreciation of the problems 
of home making is desirable for all young women whether 
they continue work at a senior college or not, the Home 
Economics course at Armstrong Junior College is designed 
to help the greatest number, and, at the same time, satisfy 
the requirements of the senior college for those who wish 
to major in home economics. The work beyond the general 
core courses will be taken in the field of home economics 
and closely related subjects. 

The entrance requirements to the home economics 
course are the same as for the liberal arts and commerce 
courses. 

With the exception of Dietetics and the course in meal 
planning and table service, home economics courses have 
been planned without prerequisite. The four courses select- 
ed in home economics are those that will give a broad train- 
ing, fit the girls for home making, and give them a richer 
life. 

The home economics clothing laboratory is splendidly 
equipped. The foods laboratory has five home kitchens and 
an attractive serving-unit. 



Course Requirements for Graduation 
Home Economics 



Art . . . , 

Biology . . . 
Chemistry 
English . . . 
Home Economics 
Humanities 

Mathematics 
Political Science 



11 .... 
11-12 . . . 
1-2 .... 
11-12 . . . 
1, 2, 3 and 5 . 
1-2 (or 2 courses 

in English) 
1 

12 (or Social 
Science 4) 

1-2 .... 



1 course 

2 courses 
2 courses 
2 courses 
4 courses 



courses 
course 



Physical Education 
Social Science . . 2-< 
Sociology ... 60 

Total specified 20 courses 

Total for graduation 20 courses 



course 

courses 

courses 

course 



OF SA\.\ \ N A H , GEORGIA 29 

Financi and i 'omnu ra 

The Junior College offers a three-year course leading 
to an Associate in Finance and Commerce diploma. The 
entrance requirements are the same as for other courses 
offered in Armstrong Junior College. 

The course of study thai has been devised is expected 
to aid the student in understanding himself and society, 

to give him some knowledge of the way the world of finance, 
industry, and trade operates, and to provide some train- 
ing in the techniques of business. Before graduation the 
student will be required to pass a test in shorthand and 
typing. 

The three-year course of study outlined below has been 
constructed to meet the needs of those who will participate 
in the life of the business community, remembering that 
Savannah is an important sea port and financial center. As 
the work is of a terminal nature, i.e., a complete course with- 
in itself which gives technical training in a specified field, 
only those students who wish to complete their work at the 
Junior College will be advised to take this course. If any 
student desires a four-year course in finance and commerce, 
he should pursue liberal arts at the Junior College with 
electives in economics, psychology, and accounting, and 
transfer to a senior college after two years at Armstrong. 

By meeting all liberal arts requirements, a commerce 
student may receive a certificate in liberal arts at the end 
of the second year; one additional year's work will be re- 
quired for the diploma in finance and commerce. 



30 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Finance and Commerce 

First Year 

Social Science . 2 1 course 

Human Biology . 11-12 2 courses 

Commerce ... 1 1 course 

Economics ...21 1 course 

English .... 11-12 2 courses 

Mathematics . . 1 or 2 and 14 ... 2 courses 

Physical Education 1 course 

Total 10 courses 

Second Year 

Commerce . . . 2-3-4 3 courses 

Foreign Language 2 courses 

Humanities . . . 1-2 2 courses 

Social Science . . 3 1 course 

Psychology ... 31 1 course 

Physical Education (or Shorthand 

and Typing) .... 1 course 

Total specified 10 course? 

Third Year 

Commerce . . . 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 . . 6 courses 

Social Science . . 4 1 course 

Electives 2 courses 

Total 9 courses 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 83 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
DIVISION OF LANG UAG ES 

English 

1. Grammar and Composition 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A review of punctuation and the fundamentals of gram- 
mar. Essays are road and discussed and themes are written 

weekly. Several novels are read out of class and reported 
on at stated intervals. The course attempts to teach the 
student to understand what he reads, to acquire a larger 
and more complete vocabulary, and to be able to organize 
and express his thoughts orally and in writing. 

2. Introduction to Literature 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of literature by types, this course includes the 
reading and discussion of representative essays, short 
stories, plays, and poems of the most outstanding English 
and American authors of the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Five or more novels will be used for collateral 
reading. 

3. Business Writing Practice 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

4. Introduction to Poetry 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course deals with the history of English poetry, a 
study of the various types and forms, and a reading and 
understanding of representative works from the leading 
English and American poets. 

5. Play Production 

5 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory work per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

This course includes a fundamental study of production 
methods with emphasis upon the technical aspects of pro- 
ducing plays in the modern theatre, such as: the physical 



32 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

theatre, brief history of the physical development of the 
1 licit re, stage craft, construction of settings, stage lighting, 
stage costuming, and stage make-up. Each member of the 
production class will he required to work on a minimum 
of one crew during the term. 

6. Play Production 

5 hours lecture per week for one quarter. 

This course is an advanced production course in the 
study of play directing and acting, devoted both to the his- 
torical and contemporary theatre. 

7. Public Speaking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A fundamental course designed to develop the public 
speaker. Emphasis is placed upon platform delivery and 
elements governing effective speaking in audience relation- 
ship. 

11-12. Freshman English 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

The course has a two-fold objective: to teach the stu- 
dent to grasp the ideas of others through learning to read 
intelligently, and to teach him to express his own ideas 
logically and forcefully in speech and in writing. Particu- 
lar emphasis is placed on acquiring a complete and usable 
vocabulary. Formal grammar, punctuation and spelling are 
applied in the papers and reports prepared by the students. 
Several novels and biographies are used as collateral 
reading. A considerable part of the course will be devoted 
to oral English. 

Humanities 

1-2. Humanities 

5 hours lecture per week for two quarters. Re- 
quired of all students planning to attend the Uni- 
versity System. 

A survey of the cultural achievements of Western Civili- 
zation. The course seeks to give the student a general under- 
standing of the leading intellectual and esthetic movements 
of Western Europe and an acquaintance with the greatest 



P S A V A \ \ \ ll . G K R <: I \ 89 

literary figures from Homer to Galsworthy. Painting, sculp- 
ture, and architecture are considered. 

Art 

1 1. Art Principles and Design 

2 lectures and 8 hours laboratory work per week 
for one quarter. Fee $2.50. 

A siuily of fundamental principles underlying all art. 
Laboratory work in the use of line, mass, and color. Intro- 
duction to color theory and lettering. 

French 

1-2. Elementary French 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

The elements of French grammar are studied with a 
view to early reading. Some 450 pages of classroom and 
collateral readings are completed. Attention is given to 
pronunciation, composition, and conversation. 

No credit will be allowed until French 2 is completed. 

3. Intermediate French 

5 hours per week for one quarter. 
Review grammar with continued stress on composition 
and oral practice. Reading of 400 pages of standard texts. 

4. Nineteenth Century French Prose 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A survey of the prose writings of the nineteenth century. 
Reading and discussion of 500 pages from representative 
writers. Reports on collateral reading. 

5. French Classical Drama 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
Representative plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 
Four plays to be read in class and four plays to be read as 
collateral. 

6. French Short Stories 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of the short story in France. 



84 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
AND MATHEMATICS 

Biological Sciences 

1-2. Principles of Animal Biology 

3 hours lecture and 5 hours laboratory per week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $2.50 each 
quarter. 

3. Invertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 11-12 
or 1-2) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. Not offered 
1939-40. 

A study of invertebrate animals including local fresh 
water and marine forms. 

4. General Vertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 
11-12 or 1-2) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

An intensive study of the vertebrate group including 
laboratory dissection of several types. The study will in- 
clude the kinds of vertebrates and their distribution in time 
and space, vertebrate embryology, and details of the 
various vertebrate organ systems. Biology of The Vertebrates^ 
by Walter, is the text used. 

5. General Botany (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. Not offered 
1939-40. 

A general survey of the plant kingdom with particular 
emphasis on the identification and study of local forms. 
This course sets forth the important facts and interpreta- 
tions with which botanical science is concerned. 

11-12. Human Biology 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Required of 
all students planning to attend the University 
System of Georgia. 



OF S A V A N N A II , G E ORG! A 

This course is designed to give the student an under- 
standing of genera] biological principles, particularly as 
applied to the human organism. The first half of the course 

includes a study of fundamental facts of biology, human 
anatomy, and physiology. The second half of the course 
includes studies in problems Of public health, reproduction, 

and the principles of genetics, evolution, and eugenics. 

Physical Sciences 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit 
$2.50. 

The first course is a study of the preparation, properties, 
and uses of a number of the non-metallic elements and their 
compounds. The fundamental laws of elementary inorganic 
chemistry are stressed. 

The second course is a continuation of Chemistry 1, and 
includes the preparation, properties, and uses of the more 
common metallic elements and their compounds. The 
laboratory work will offer several experiments which will 
serve as an introduction to qualitative and quantitative 
analysis. 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 1-2) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit $2.50. 

The text used is by Louis J. Curtman. The lectures will 
deal with the theoretical aspects of the subject with special 
reference to the application of the law of mass action. The 
laboratory work will consist of a study of the reactions, 
precipitations, and detections of the principal metals and 
acid radicals. 

21-22. General Physics (not offered 1939-40) 

4 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory work per 
week for two quarters. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
Deposit $2.50. 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

This course is a study of the properties of matter, 
mechanics of solids, mechanics of fluids and heat, sound, 
light, and electricity. 

11-1-. Physical Science 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Required of 
all students planning to attend the University 
System of Georgia. 

This course is a survey of the Physical Sciences. The 
subject matter is taken from the fields of physics, chemistry, 
astronomy, geology, and geography. In general, the objec- 
tives of the course are to make one more familiar with the 
physical phenomena of our environment; to develop an ap- 
preciation of the scientific method ; and to furnish a cultural 
and general informational background which may be used 
as a foundation for future work by those students whose 
interests may lie in the field of the Physical Sciences. 

Mathematics 

1. A survey of Mathematics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The subject matter stressed in this course is of utili- 
tarian and cultural nature. Work in finance and statistics 
is included with a study of the fundamentals of algebra and 
trigonometry. The introduction traces the history of our 
system of computation, showing the role mathematics has 
played in our social development. 

2-3-4. College Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic 
Geometry 
5 hours a week for three quarters. 

Course 2 is a study of quadratics; ratio, proportion, and 
variation; the binomial theorem; complex numbers; theory 
of equations; determinants; logarithms and the slide-rule; 
and permutations, combinations, and probability. 

Course 3 is a study of plane and spherical trigonometry. 

Course 4 devotes four and one-half months to the study 
of plane and solid analytics. 



() F S A V A N N A H , GEORGIA 

11. Elements of statistics (Prerequisite Mathematics 

1 or 2) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The collection, classification, and presentation of nu- 
merical data. 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

History 

2. The Progress of Western Civilization through the 
Industrial Revolution (1660-1870) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The parliamentary system of England, absolutism, Vol- 
taire, the French Revolution, the rise of capitalism, the In- 
dustrial Revolution, socialism, nationalism, the rise of the 
United States, the influence of the American frontier, and 
the scientific and social progress of the 19th century are 
surveyed. 

3. The Contemporary World (1870-1939) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Industrialization of the nations, imperialism, causes of 
the World War, post-war nationalism, movements toward 
economic self-sufficiency, dictatorships, the New Deal, move- 
ments for world peace, and scientific and social progress 
of the 20th century are surveyed. 

4. Contemporary Georgia 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Required of all 
students planning to attend the University System 
of Georgia. 

The economic, social, and political problems of Georgia 
are studied with particular emphasis on regional and nation- 
al problems which impinge, either directly or indirectly, on 
our state. Human and natural resources, the conditions of 
agriculture and industry, and problems of state and local 
governments are surveyed. 



38 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

5. English History 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Particular emphasis will be placed upon English back- 
grounds of American history. 

Political Scienci 

L2. American Government and Politics 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Principal emphasis is placed upon principles, processes, 
and problems, with some attention given to political de- 
velopments under the New Deal. 

14. The Governments of Europe (Prerequisite 2 
courses in Social Science) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Particular emphasis is placed on the political machinery 
and problems of government in England, France, Italy, 
Germany, and Russia. European governmental methods 
that differ from our own will be given special attention. 

Economics 

21. Introductory Economics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A course which introduces the student to economic con- 
cepts and principles with due attention to modern economic 
institutions and problems. 

Psychology 

31. Introductory Psychology 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

An introduction to the scientific study of mental life. 

Sociology 

60. Family Relationships 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of factors which have made for permanency in 
family life ; changing social and economic conditions which 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

affect family members in their relations with each other 
and the community; survivals of various characteristics 
affecting family litV and consideration of their worth; con- 
servation o( tin 1 family and education for family life. 



DIVISION OF FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

1. Introduction to Business Organization (Prerequisite 
to all commerce courses) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course and mathematics 1 are prerequisite to all 
other commerce courses. Commerce 1 is designed to in- 
troduce students to the field of business organization and 
management. A description of the structure and functions 
of modern business is presented and an insight given into 
the fields or divisions of business. Careful attention is given 
to a study of the importance and scope of each field and its 
relation to the other fields of work emphasized. 

2-3. Accounting 

3 hours lectures and 4 hours laboratory a week 
for two quarters. 

Principles of single proprietorship, partnership, and 
corporation accounting ; the balance sheet, profit and loss 
statements, and the theory of debits and credits. In course 
3 intermediate accounting will be covered. 

4. Accounting Problems 

3 lectures and 4 hours laboratory a week. 

5. Marketing 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A general critical survey of the field of marketing and 
consumer demand in relation to the marketing machinery. 
Functions, methods, policies, marketing costs, and the 
problems of the farmer, manufacturer, wholesaler, com- 
mission merchant, broker, retailer, and other middlemen. 
Emphasis on principles, trends, and policies in relation to 
marketing efficiency. 



40 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

(>. Marketing (Prerequisite Marketing -)) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Special attention is given means, methods, and problems 

relating to retailing. Some attention is devoted to credits 
and collections. 

7. Money and Banking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the principles, functions, and forms of money 
and credit; analysis of money and credit problems; theory 
of money and banking; and banking practices. 

8. Business Finance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of business financial organization with special 
attention to the corporation; management of capital ; prob- 
lems of financial administration and securities; analysis of 
causes of failures. 

9. Marketing (Prerequisite Marketing 5) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A course in salesmanship and advertising. 

10. Insurance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of life, fire, health, and accident insurance; 
employer's liability, title and credit insurance ; and insur- 
ance and bonding companies. 

11-12. Business Law (not offered 1939-40) 
5 hours a week for two quarters. 

A brief study of law from the business man's standpoint 
dealing with such subjects as contracts, wills, sales, negoti- 
able instruments. Attention is given to the historic and 
economic development of certain principles of commercial 
usage. Where Georgia statutes and practices are at variance 
with those of other states, the Georgia rules are emphasized. 

21. Shorthand and Typing 

3 hours class room work and 4 hours practice each 
week. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. 



o P S A V A N N A li , GEORGIA 41 

DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Clothing 

;> lectures, (> hours laboratory each week for one 
q nailer. 

This course is designed to establish appreciations, inter- 
ests, habits, and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, 
design, construction, and care of clothing. Problems are 
provided so that students gain actual experience in ap- 
plication of these fundamental principles. The clothing- 
budget is studied as an aid in obtaining the greatest satis- 
faction from the money spent for clothing. 

2. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A study of food emphasizing its selection and prepara- 
tion, applying fundamental scientific principles. A unit in 
marketing will present actual problems of consumer, ob- 
servation of marketing conditions, factors affecting price, 
grades, brands of food, and training for more intelligent 
buying. The unit in common foods and their preparation 
acts as a basis for further meal preparation. 

3. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A continuation of foods including different types of 
dishes used for specific purposes, food selection, meal 
planning, and table service. Students gain actual experience 
in all forms of family entertaining such as family meals, 
buffets, teas and receptions. 

5. Home Planning and Furnishing 

4 lectures, 2 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. 

A study of planning and furnishing the home from the 
standpoint of family needs; modern tendencies in housing 
and application of principles of art to home furnishing; a 



42 A R USTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

short history of architecture; location of house; study of 
floor plans, exteriors, grounds, furnishings of various rooms 
emphasizing heating and lighting and treatment of walls, 
floors, windows, together with selection and arrangement 
of furnishings. A short study of house care and manage- 
ment will be made. 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
LIBRARY ECONOMICS 

1. Freshman Physical Education 

:i hours a week throughout the year. 
One course, special lectures. Games and various group 
activities to meet individual needs indicated by medical and 
physical examination and previous physical education. 
Follow-up physical examinations, conferences, and health 
lectures. 

2. Sophomore Physical Education 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 
One course, special lectures. Continuation of Physical 
Education 1. A wider choice of activities is permitted. 

3. Dancing 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 
An appreciation of the dance as an art. Corrective 
exercises for posture and balance. 

4. Advanced Dancing 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 

Intermediate ballet combinations, character dancing, 
brief study of the modern technique of dancing. 

The dancing classes are conducted by Ebba Oleson 
Thomson, who was formerly a pupil of Margit Tarassof, 
Michael Fokine, Albertina Rasch and Raymond Bott. 

Library Economics 

1. A short course in the facilities and use of the library 
is required of all freshmen. No credit is allowed, but the 
course must be passed before the student receives credit 
for work completed at the College. 






9 A V A \ \ \ II 



GEORGIA 



i a 



GRADUATES, L938 



Adams, Charles David 
Barragan, Prank 
Bowyer, Harry Llewellyn 
Brennan, Helen 
Cook, Gerald 
Cook, Ifarieta 
de Valinger, Wesley 
I tuPont, John Larsen 
Freeman, Samuel Horace 
(livens, Louis Mosby 
Gould, Lila Emily 
Gregory, Joan 
Gumble, Adaline 
Harmon, Doralea 
Hausmann, Martha Anne 
Hill, Georgia Anna 
Hollis, Juanita Ruby 
Holloway, Virginia Ann 
Housholder, Nedra Marlene 
Hutchins, Claudine Clark 
Jenkins, Hattie Gere 
Johnson, Dorothy Eloise 
Kravitch, Sylvia Roslyn 
LaMotte, Fanine Irene 
Leon, Despina Lettye 
Lynes, Betty 



McLeod, M;n\ [sabel 
McLeod, Jeannette Louise 
MilUr, Jane Elizabeth 
Bfonsees, ( ieraldine AJethia 
Nelson, Dorothy Bonnell 
Norton, Elizabeth Munsoll 
Orr, Ellen Sibyl 
Patrick, George Carey 
Phillips, Arthur William 
Powers, Eleanor Mary 
Rawlings, Margaret Eleanor 
Rice, William B. 
Richard, Douglass Mims 
Riddle, William Anderson 
Roberts, Julia Marguerite 
Sanders, Frank Powell 
Segall, Regina Jeannette 
Smith, Henry Carl 
Solms, Selma Louise 
Traub, Josephine Heyman 
Tyre, John Davis 
\\ aite, Nelson Andrew 
Waldhour, Elizabeth Ardelle 
Warner, Isabel McLeran 
Woodward, Rupert Carleton 



STUDENTS ENROLLED YEAR 1938—1939 



Total Number Advanced Students 
Total Number First Year Students 
Special Students .... 

Evening School Students 



107 

183 

2 

117 



Grand Total 



409 



44 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



ADVANCED STUDENTS 



Bainbridge, Betty 
Barbee, Gertrude — Honor (had. 
from St. Vincent's Academy 

Bedingfield, Grace 
Blackwell, Martha 
Blitch, Wilder 
Bowyer, Morehouse 
Boyce, Mary 
Brady, Kenneth 
Brown, Thomas 
Brushwood, Chester 
Bumann, Virginia 
Burke, Marguerite 



Campbell, Decatur 
Chapman, Horace 
Clark, Nell 
Cohen, Rhoda 
Cranman, Arthur 
Crisfield, Mary 

D 
Davis, Joseph 
Davis, Robert 
Dodd, Elizabeth 
Douglas, B. L. 

Draughon, Myrtice — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

DuPont, John 
Dutton, Margaret 



Edwards, Anita 
Edwards, Elizabeth 



Falk, Doris — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah Hiyh 

Fonseca, Frank 

Fox, Sarah 

Frank, Eleanor 



Gardner, John 

Gibson, Louise 

Glass, William 

Goette, Mary Bernard 

Googe, Henrietta 

Guest, William 

Guill, Ann — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah Hiyli 

H 

Hall, I. B. 
Harms, Lucy 
Hearn, William 
Helmken, Maree 
Heyman, Jeanette 
Hipson, Jeanne 
Hodges, Geneva 
Hodges, James 
Holliman, Evalena 
Hornstein, Frances 
Humphrey, Clarissa 
Hyrne, Jonathan 



Irby, Eleanor 



Jewell, Corinna 

K 

Kaufmann, Caroline 
Kiley, Melvin 
Kleeman, Veronica 
Kravitch, Phyllis 



laird, Jean 
Lamas, Andrew 
Lang, Aaron 
Lloyd, William 



O F 



S A \ ANN \ II 



<i I R «■ I A 



16 



ADVANCED STUDENTS (Continued) 



M 



■cFeeley, Constance Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

Mil aughlin, John 

Ifallory, Mildred 

Meddin, Gerald 

Michols. Julian 

Ifiller, Robert 

Miller, William Honor Grad. 

from Pembroki . Gi orgia 
Morgan, Caryl — Honor Grad. 

from Springfield, Georgia 
Mulling, .lack 

N 

Nathan, Evelyn 
Nichols, Fenwick T., Jr. 

Norton, Mrs. Elizabeth 



Pfeiffer, Louis 
Phillips, Arthur 
Poppell, Allan 
Price, Thomas 



Rhodes, Dorothy 
Richardson, Mildred 
Richman, Joseph 
Rolison, Estelle — Honor Grad. 

Commercial High 
Rosenzweig, Lillian — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Rossiter, Jule 
Royall, Katherine 
Rubin, Saul 



S 
Sallette, Laura Honor Grad, 

f rom LfUdowiei, Gi orgia 
S< \ N-, Charles 

Sharpley, Helen- Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Simmons, Mary 
Simpson, John 
Smith, Allan 
Stevens, Elizabeth 
Stevens, Thomas 
Stoughton, Owen 
Sullivan, Mary 



Tharpe, Gladys 

Thomas, Miriam 

Tietjen, Eleanor 

Tregone, Frances — Honor Grad. 

from Monroe, Georgia 
Turner, Leslie — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Tyre, McDonell 

W 

Waldrop, Charles 

Walsh, Thomas — Honor Grad. 

from Benedictine M. S. 
Waring, Anne 
Weitmon, Ethelda 
Wimberly, Olin — Honor Grad. 

from Brunswick, Georgia 
Woodward, James 
Wootton, Amelia 



Youmans, Mary 



46 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 



I-, Robert Hown Grad* 
from Savannah High 
Alexander, Ruth 

Allen, Judson 
Allen, Wood row 
Anderson, Frances 
Aranda, Imogene 
Arden, Virginia 
Aikin, Marvin 
Arnau, Maudine 
At wood, Iris 

B 

Racon, Jewell — Honor Grad. 
from Willie, Georgia 

Raggs, Ed 

Bailey, O'Bannon 

Bailey, Sam 

Baker, Elinor 

Ball, Carolyn 

Barnes, Laurene — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

Barton, Dixie 

Barton, Norman 

Bennett, Lee — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

Berry, Bernice 
Bischoff, Frances 
Biair, James 
Bland, Lillie Mae 
Blumenthal, Herbert 
Boniface, John 
Boyd, Eleanor 
Brady, James 
Brennan, James 
Brogdon, Cecil 
Bruce, James Y. 
Bryan, Elizabeth 
Bumann, Caroline 
Byington, Betsy 
Byrd, Jane — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah HigJi 
Byrnes, Arthur 



Chandler, Madison 
Chastain, Reid G. 

Cheney, William 
Christian, Joseph 
Christiansen, Ruth 
Clark, Harriette 
Cohen, A. J., Jr. 
Cole, Nancy 
Collins, Lieut, (i. W. 
Cone, William 
Cooper, J. Max 
Cory, Ellen 
Cronemiller, George 
Crosby, Jayne 
Crumbley, Betty 
Cummings, Eugene 



Davis, Hasseltine — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

Davis, Joseph 

Dodd, Muriel 

Downing, Guion 

Driggers, Mae 

Dupuy, Vivian 



Edel, Helen 
Ellis, James 
Elmore, David 
Evans, Jean 

F 

Farr, Ann 

Fawcett, Dorothy 

Fennell, Anita 

Findley, Hattie Mae 

Fordham, Leon 

Fountain, Andrew 

Freeman, Helen — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 



O P S A V A \ \ \ H 



GEORGIA 



47 



I [RS I' \ EAR STUDENTS (Continued) 



G 

Gahagan, Powell 

Gardner, Sam 

Garrard, William 

George, Thomas E., Jr. 

Gillespie, Mildred 

Gnann, Prances 

Gooch, Pauline 

Gordon. Roberl 

Griffin, Herbert Hoi or Grad. 
from Benedictine M. S. 

Guest, Mamie D. 

H 
Hadsell, Louise Marie 

Kalvorsen, William — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

Harms, Madeleine 

Hart, Gordon 

Helmly, Isabel K. 

Hesse, Jean 

Holbrook, Mary — Ho)>or Grad. 
trow Norfolk, Virginia 

Hutto, Monroe 



Ihley, Richard 
Irby, Gay 
Ivey, Frank 

J 

James, Frances — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Jaudon, Jack 
Javo, George 
Johnson, Elizabeth 

K 
Karp, Frances 
King, Frances 
Kleinberg, Barbara 
Klingon, Ruth 



I. 

Langston, Alex Honoi Grad, from 

La nil r High. Macon, Georgia 
Laughlin, Heath 
Lee, Wright 
I • nnox, Edwin Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Longwater, Leon 

M 
McCauley, John C. 
McClure, Hoyt 
McCreery, Elizabeth 
McFarland, Beverly 
McGowan, Gilbert 
McLaughlin, Robert 
Mc Peters, Mary 
Magee, John 
Maner, Frank 
Marcus, Murray 
Marshall, Samuel F. 
Mason, Cecil 
Meisner, Agnes 
Moore, Charlotte 
Moore, Jesse 
Mosley, Marjorie 
Myers, Betsy 

N 
Newby, Virginia 
Newton, Byron 

O 

Odrezin, David 
Oplinger, Horace E. 

P 

Parker, Dorothy 
Patterson, Billy 
Perdomo, Marta 
Perfect, Evelyn 
Picard, Harry 
Pinckney, Vincent 
Porter, Elizabeth 
Powell, Carleton 
Powers, Marie 
Pruitt, Francis 



48 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS— (Continued) 



Q 



Quattlebaum, John 
R 

Rabb, Caroline — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah Higli 
Ralston, John 
Ranitz, Catherine 
Reagan, William 
Reed, James 
Reid, William 
Renfroe, Rudulph 
Rice, Marion — Honor Grad. 

from Commercial High 
Riedel, Augustus 
Roane, Nathan 
Robertson, Siegvart 
Rubin, Florence — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 



Sadler, Barney 
Saffold, Billy 
Schafer, Catherine 
Schur, Jean 
Schwanebeck, Alfred 
Schweizer, Carol 
Scott, Jane 
Scott, Tinley 
Seawright, Eunice 
Seigler, Robert 
Shaw, Harry 
Sheehan, John 
Smallbones, Kathryn 
Smith, Annie Mae 



Smith, Constancia 
Smith, Joseph 

Smith, Margaret — Honor Grad, 
from Homerville, Georgia 

Solana, Elizabeth 

Street, Frances — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

Sullivan, James 

Sussman, Martin 



Thigpen, Frances 
Tilson, Geraldine 

V 

Yannerson, Frances — Honor Grad. 
from Savannah High 

W 

Walker, Howell 

Walker, Julaine 

Wall, Cecilia Z. 

Walsh, A. L. 

Whittle, Joseph — Honor Grad. 

from Brunswick, Georgia 
Wilkerson, Sarah 
Williams, Jack 
Wilson, Claude 
Wolfe, Saxton 
Woodruff, Catherine 
Wortsman, Elise — Honor Grad. 

from Savannah High 
Wright, Jane — Hoywr Grad. 

from Savannah High 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



BULLETIN OF 

ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 
COLLEGE e 1940-1941 

A City Supported Junior College of Savannah, Georgia 



135 

S 



Volume V [°] Number 1 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 






1940-19 11 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 

A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




1 8335 



MEMBERSHIP IN 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR L940— 1941 



Fall Quarter 

Faculty meeting, 9:00 A. M. ... Thursday, September 12 
Freshman assembly in 

Auditorium, 10:00 A. M. . . . Thursday, September 12 

Freshman registration Thursday, September 12 

Freshman preliminary testa . . Friday-Saturday, September 13-14 

Upperclassman registration Friday, September 13 

Opening- exercises Monday, September 16 

All classes begin Monday, September 16 

Test Friday, October 11 

Faculty meeting Thursday, October 1 7 

Armistice Day address Friday, November 8 

Playhouse production . . . Monday-Saturday, November 11-16 
Examinations .... Monday-Wednesday, November 25-27 



Winter Quarter 

Registration Monday, December 2 

All classes begin Tuesday, December 3 

Test Monday, December 23 

Christmas holidays December 23-January 1 

Classes begin Thursday, January 2 

Test Friday, January 31 

Faculty meeting Friday, February 7 

Institute of Citizenship . . . Thursday-Friday, February 6-1 
Playhouse production . . . Monday-Saturday, February 17-22 
Examinations . . . Thursday-Tuesday, February 27-March 4 
Spring holidays March 5-9 

Spring Quarter 

Registration Monday, March 10 

All classes begin Tuesday, March 11 

Test Friday, April 4 

Playhouse production .... Monday-Saturday, April 7-12 

Faculty meeting Friday, April 11 

Playhouse production .... Monday-Saturday, May 19-24 

Examinations Monday-Thursday, May 26-29 

Faculty meeting Friday. May 30 

President's reception Friday, May 30 

Alumni luncheon Saturday, May 31 

Graduation exercises Monday, June 2 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

a* ru ral Information □ 

College Commission 7 

Faculty 7 

History. Organisation, and Aims 9 

Library l l 

College Book Store 11 

Gifts to the College 11 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 13 

Requirements for Admission 14 

Fees and Refunds 15 

Enrollment Procedure 1(! 

Physical Examination 17 

Testing and Guidance 17 

Student Load 17 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 18 

Explanation of Course Credit 18 

Transfers from Other Institutions 18 

Transfers to Other Institutions 18 

Reports and Grades 18 

Honor Points 19 

Honors 19 

Perelstine Award 20 

Co-operation with Examiner of University System of Georgia . 20 

Final Examinations 20 

Attendance Regulations 21 

Rules on Personal Conduct 21 

Withdrawals 21 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 21 

Number Required in Courses 22 

Student Activities 22 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations 23 

College Organizations, Lectures, and Concerts 24 

The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship .... 24 

Aeronautics 24 

Student Publications 24 

The Savannah Playhouse 25 

Holidays 25 

Adult Education 25 



A R M S T R N G JUNIOR C O L L E G K 
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Conth 

( bourses of Study Pa . fc 

Certificates Granted 26 

Genera] Requirements for Graduation 26 

Libera] Arts 2(5 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Liberal Arts .... 27 

Home Economics 28 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Home Economics ... 28 

Finance and Commerce 29 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Finance and Commerce . 30 

Course Descriptions 

Division of Humanities 31 

English 31 

Humanities 32 

Art 32 

French 32 

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 33 

Biological Sciences 33 

Physical Sciences 34 

Mathematics 35 

Division of Social Sciences 36 

History 36 

Political Science 37 

Economics 37 

Psychology 37 

Sociology 37 



Division of Finance and Commerce 38 

Division of Home Economics 41 

Courses in Physical Education, Library Science and Aeronautics 42 

Graduates, 1939 43 

Students Enrolled Year L939-1940 43 

Advanced Students 

First Year Students 



«) I' S A V A \ N A II , (i E O R <i I A 7 

Till-: COIiLEGE commission 

ROB! bt M. Hutu ( 'hairman 

Hebschel V. Jenkins Vice-Chairman 

Michael J. Bgan Herbert L. Kayton 

Thomas GAMBLE, Ex officio MRS. Mills P.. Lank 

Hebman w . Hesse, Ex officio Mrs. Charles D. Ri ssell 



THE FACULTY 

Ernest a. Lowe, H.S.C President 

.1. Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A. . . . Dean 

and Instructor in Social Sciences 

FRANCES ENNIS COUCH, R.S.H.E., Georgia State College for Women; 
If. A. in Household Arts Education, Columbia University. 

Instructor in Home Economics. 

John P. Dyer, B.A., Bryson College; M.A., Peabody College; Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University. 

Instructor in Social Sci< nces and Director of Guidance. 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B. and M.A., University of Georgia. 
Instructor in English. 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., Mercer University; M.S., Emory University. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

Lulie Henderson, A.B. in Education, University of Georgia; A.B. in 
Library Science, Emory University. 

Librarian. 

Reuben W. Holland, A.B. and M.A., Emory University. 

Instructor in Romance Languages and Treasurer. 

Stacy Keach, B.S. and M.A., Northwestern University. 
Instructor in English. 

Arthur T. Kolgaklis, B.S.C., Georgia School of Technology; M.B.A., 
Harvard University. 

Instructor in Commerce. 

Robert B. Platt, B.S., Emory and Henry College; M.A., Peabody 
College. 

Instructor in Biology. 



8 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Ivkv M. SHIVER, B.S.C., University of Georgia. 

Director o) Athletics and Physical Education. 

ROBERT M. Stk.mii.. B.S.C. and M.A., Ohio State University. 

Instructor in Finance and Commerce. 

CHARLES W. Williams, A. B., Harvard University; M.A., University of 
Maryland. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Nelta Beckett. Associate in Liberal Arts, Armstrong Junior College. 
Secretary and Instructor in Typewriting and Short- 
hand. 

Merle Massengale Bruce, B.S., Birmingham-Southern College. 
Secretary and Assistant Treasurer. 






F S A V A N \ A II . GEORGIA 9 

HISTORY, ORGANIZATION, AND AIMS 

For the past few years, Savannah and the surrounding 
community have felt the need Tor an institution of higher 
learning. Realizing thai there is an increasing number of 
young men and women who find it inconvenient or inad- 
visable to continue their education at out-of-town colleges, 
Mayor Thomas Gamble and a group of leading citizens 
conceived the idea of establishing a junior college in 
Savannah. These men, working tirelessly over a period of 
months, finally saw their hopes become an actuality when 
on May 27, 1935, the city council authorized the establish- 
ment of a municipally supported junior college to be 
governed temporarily by a commission of fourteen members 
appointed by the mayor. The first commission was com- 
posed of the following leading Savannah citizens: Chair- 
man, A. Pratt Adams; Vice-Chairman, Thomas Gamble; 
Henry Blun, II. L. Fulton, H. M. Garwes, H. F. Gibbons, 
H. V. Jenkins, II. L. Kayton, Mrs. Mills B. Lane, A. B. 
Lovett, Frank W. Spencer, O. B. Strong, Mrs. Lucy B. 
Trosdal, Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 General 
Assembly the size of the commission was reduced to eight 
including the Mayor and Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education as ex officio members. The day before 
the ordinance creating the college was passed, Mayor 
Gamble announced that the problem of housing the new 
school was solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz and her 
daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously pre- 
sented their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. 
Armstrong, their husband and father, respectively. Due to 
the many spacious rooms, remarkably few changes were 
necessary to fit the building for college purposes. The Arm- 
strong building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, is one 
of the most beautiful and expensive college buildings in 
the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded 
the Lucas Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in 



10 A R M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

founding the Junior College. In his speech of acceptance 
Mr. Gamble announced that he had received the gift of a 
building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house classes in finance 
and commerce, the building to be named in honor of the 

donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings 
is the auditorium and recreation building erected and 
equipped by the city of Savannah and the federal govern- 
ment at a cost of $70,000. All three buildings, standing 
side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park 
in the city, which consists of forty acres and is used by 
Armstrong students for recreational purposes. The Georgia 
Historical Society library, to which the students have access, 
faces the park and lies just across Whitaker street from 
the College buildings. 

In the Fall of 1937 the heirs of General and Mrs. 
Alexander R. Lawton gave the handsome Lawton Memorial 
auditorium to the City of Savannah for the use and benefit 
of Armstrong Junior College and of the people of Savan- 
nah. 

Under the will of the late Carrie Colding one-half of the 
sale price of the Colding residence on Jones Street was con- 
veyed to the College. 

The Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah 
and the adjacent community by giving to the young men 
and women who attend its classes an understanding of the 
world in which they live and an appreciation of the best 
that has been achieved by western civilization. Its graduates 
are equipped to continue their studies in the junior class 
of a senior college ; but for those who do not desire to 
pursue their work elsewhere, terminal work is offered. The 
College attempts to provide its students with a keener reali- 
zation of the duties and responsibilities of citizenship and 
a broader conception of the world and its problems. 






o V SAVANNAH, GEORGIA i i 

Library 

The College library and reading rooms arc located in 
the Armstrong building. The furniture is walnut, finished 
to blend with the walnut paneled room. The capacity of the 
two reading rooms is adequate to seat one-fourth of the 
student body. 

In addition to the College library, the students have 
access to the Savannah Public Library and the Library of 
the Georgia Historical Society, which is one-half block from 
the Junior College. These libraries cooperate in supplying 

not only general reading matter but also books especially 
used in the courses of study. 

The aim of the library is to meet the demands of junior 
college students by providing material necessary to a more 
complete understanding of their studies and to stimulate 
their interest and enjoyment in recreational reading from 
the best of the older and modern writers. A course in the 
facilities and use of the library is required of all students. 
This provides a better understanding of books and a more 
intelligent use of the library. 

The library is under the care of a trained librarian and 
student assistants. It is open thirteen hours each day of 
the week, with the exception of Sunday, when the library 
is closed. 

The College Book Store 

A book store is provided for the convenience of the 
students. Textbooks and classroom supplies are available 
at cost plus a minimum charge for handling. 

Gifts to the College 

No college was ever more fortunate in having good 
friends who have in so many instances satisfied needs of 
the institution through substantial gifts. This is truly a city 
college ; scores of Savannah citizens have contributed in 
some way to its establishment. 






12 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Soon after it was known that the College would open 
in September, Mr. Boykin Paschal, president of the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, volunteered the services of that 
organization in the collection of books for the library. At 
the call of this group of progressive business and pro- 
fessional men, hundreds of Savannahians contributed books 
from their private libraries. Some two thousand volumes 
were delivered to the College by the Junior Chamber. 
Through their efforts, these gentlemen gave the College a 
collection which will be of permanent value. 

Mrs. B. F. Bullard, for many years a friend of education 
in this state, gave the College fifty volumes selected from 
her library and $200 with which to buy books and stage 
equipment. 

During the winter of 1935 Mr. Mills B. Lane, an out- 
standing Savannah citizen, purchased the home of Judge 
George T. Cann adjoining the College property, and pre- 
sented it to the Commission to be used to house classes in 
finance and commerce. This gift, with the exception of the 
gift of the original college building by Mrs. Lucy M. C. 
Moltz and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, is the 
largest that has thus far been made. 

An auditorium and class room building was built in 
1936 by the federal government and the city of Savannah 
at a cost of $70,000. It has been in use since September, 
1936. 

The handsome Lawton Memorial auditorium building 
on Bull Street was given to the City of Savannah for the 
use of the Armstrong Junior College and the people of 
Savannah by the heirs of General and Mrs. Alexander R. 
Lawton in the Fall of 1937. 

By bequest one-half of the sale price of the Col ding 
residence on Jones Street was given the College in 1937. 

Two friends of the College, both desiring to remain 
anonymous, have made contributions valued at $2,000 each. 
One gift was for the purpose of making in the auditorium 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

certain changes which will greatly increase the usefulness 
()( the stage; the second gift was several hundred very 

Valuable and useful hooks. 

in acknowledging gifts, the College wishes to express 
appreciation of the many books and periodicals presented 
by Mr. Thomas Gamble. Mr. Gamble is a frequent visitor 

at the College and he seldom conies without bringing one 
or more carefully selected volumes for the library. 

These gifts, and those of scores of other loyal friends 
whose names cannot be mentioned in the short space pro- 
vided in this bulletin, represent substantial contributions 
to the development of the College. The administration, 
faculty, and students wish to express their appreciation. 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

Since the establishment of the College, Savannah 
citizens and organizations have been extremely generous, 
in providing scholarship and loan funds for those students 
needing financial assistance. In addition to scholarships pro- 
vided locally, the National Youth Administration last year 
aided many students. This assistance has been extremely 
valuable to the College as it has been possible to use student 
talent in the several departments where help is needed. 

Six scholarships of one hundred dollars each, to cover 
registration fees for one year, are awarded by the Junior 
College to the six students ranking highest in scholarship 
tests given at the College in May of each year. Applicants 
must be residents of Savannah and rank in the upper one- 
third of their high school graduating class in scholarship. 

Students desiring aid may make application direct to the 
officers of the organizations listed below or to Professor 
Foreman M. Hawes, who is in charge of this work for the 
College. Application blanks may be obtained from Mr. 
Hawes. 



14 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The organizations and individuals who have provided 
student aid through the past five years are: 

National Youth Administration 

B. II. Levy Brother and Company 

Business & Professional Women's Club 

Federation of Women's Clubs 

Pilot Club 

Pilot's Association 

Landrum Lodge 

Friedmans' Jewelers 

Woman's Club of Jewish Alliance 

Pan Hellenic Association 

Savannah Rotary Club 

Mrs. Joseph-Brooks Abrams 

Harmonie Club 

Requirements for Admission 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior 
College must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school with sixteen units of credit. 

2. A general average of all high school work amount- 
ing to five points above the passing grade, when 
figures are used, or one step above passing, when 
letters are used, will be required. 

3. The following specific requirements must also be 
met: 

A. Eight constants — 3 units in English, 2 units in 
social studies, 2 units in mathematics (1 must be 
in algebra), and 1 unit in science. 

B. Eight electives — 4 of these electives must be from 
the following subjects: English, social studies, 
mathematics, science, and foreign language. Four 
units may be from the vocational and avocational 
groups. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant 
should be made out on the proper forms by a competent 
official of the high school and mailed directly to the office 
of the Dean. This certificate becomes the property of the 
Junior College and cannot be returned to the applicant. 



o p S A V A N NAM, GEORGIA 15 

F< ( s am/ Refunds 

Fees in Armstrong Junior College, including registra- 
tion fee, and a $5.00 student activity fee, will amount to 

a total of $105 for the year for resident and non-resident 
students alike, payable $35 upon entrance 1 in September, 
$35 at the beginning of the second quarter in December, and 
$35 at the beginning of the third quarter in March. The 
student activity fee will include a subscription to The Ink- 
well, the College newspaper, one copy of the College 
animal, and entrance to some of the athletic contests. 

Students taking science courses with laboratory work 
will be required to pay a small fee which is indicated in the 
description of the science courses found under "Courses of 
Instruction" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Fall - - $35.00 Registration fee 
Winter - $35.00 Registration fee 
Spring - $35.00 Registration fee 

$105.00 Total 

Laboratory fees additional. 

Special students will be admitted only by permission of 
the Dean. For less than three courses in any one quarter 
the charge will be $15.00 for each course. 

A late registration fee of $5.00 will be charged any 
students who fail to register and pay tuition fees on the day 
designated for registration at the beginning of each quarter, 
unless excused because of sickness. 

In afternoon and evening classes a fee of $8.00 will be 
charged for one-half course and $15.00 for one course, 
the maximum number of evening courses allowed for any 
one quarter. This rate applies to the courses taken within 
one quarter only. A course includes three eighty-five 
minute lecture periods each week. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a 
quarter will receive a refund of one-half of the registration 
fee. No refunds will be made after the first thirty days of a 
term, and no refunds will be made to those dismissed from 
College. 



16 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Enrollrru nt Procedure 

Schedule of physical examinations for all first year 
students will be arranged September 12, and registration 
of fresh men will be completed on September 12. No student 
will be permitted to register unless a transcript showing 
all high school and college credits earned is in the hands of 
the Dean. Considerable delay and perhaps expense may be 
avoided by attending to this matter at least one month be- 
fore the college opens. 

Any freshman permitted to register after September 12 
will be charged a late registration fee of $5.00. Registra- 
tion includes the payment of fees to the Treasurer. 

All students will be required to make out a schedule 
for the year at the beginning of the fall quarter. Changes 
and additions will cost $1.00 each unless the student secures 
exemption from the Dean for providential reasons. 

All freshmen applicants must register in person and 
follow this procedure : 

1. Introduction of members of the faculty and ex- 
planation of courses at 10 A. M., September 12, in 
the College Auditorium. 

2. Registration, Armstrong Building, September 12. 
Be certain you have filled out application for ad- 
mission forms. Secure schedule. 

3. Payment of all fees in the Treasurer's office, Septem- 
ber 12. This may be done any time between the 
hours of 11:00 and 5:00. 

4. Friday-Saturday, September 13-14 will be devoted 
to preliminary tests, which will be required of all 
freshmen without any exceptions. Tests are 
scheduled to begin at 10:00 A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

Registration and payment of fees of upperclassmen will 
be completed on September 13. Any upperclassman per- 
mitted to register or pay fees after that date will be charged 
a late registration fee of $5.00. 



O F S A V A \ \ A II , G E O R G 1 A 17 

Physical Examination 
A physical check up will be required of entering 
students. Additional announcements will lie made during 
the tall quarter. 

T( sting and Guidanci 

The College feels that it can render a most important 

service to the student by helping him find that vocation or 
profession where he can realize the most satisfaction and 
success in life. With this in mind a committee of testing 
and guidance has been set up through which the student 
may receive sound advice on his personal and vocational 
problems. This committee studies the individual student and 
tries to discover his aptitudes and abilities. The information 
thus obtained is utilized by the entire faculty. 

In order that the College may have the necessary in- 
formation upon which to build a satisfactory guidance 
program, all students are required to take a series of tests 
before entrance requirements are fulfilled and registration 
completed. All students are required to take a physical 
examination which is administered by the College in con- 
junction with the City Health Department. A student who 
can not take the examination at the appointed time will 
be given an examination at a later date and charged a fee 
of two dollars. The physical condition of each student is 
studied, and recommendations made where such are neces- 
sary. 

Student Load 

A normal load is three and one-third courses each 
quarter, and students will be required to carry this amount 
of work unless special arrangements are made with the 
Dean. A student must pass nine courses before he will 
be ranked as a sophomore. 

Students who make the Dean's List any one quarter may 
carry an additional course or a maximum of four and one- 
third courses for the subsequent quarter by payment of a 
fee of $5.00. If for any reason a student not on the Dean's 
List is permitted to carry four courses an additional fee of 
§10.00 will be charged. 



18 A R M STRONG JUNIOR C O L L E G E 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 

Permission of the Dean is necessary to drop a subject 
or to transfer from one subject or section to another. 

Explanation of Course Credit 

The school year lasts nine months and is divided into 
three quarters, Fall, Winter, and Spring. A course includes 
five fifty-five minute lecture periods per week for one 
quarter. A course is 5 quarter hours or 3 1 3 semester 
hours. 

Transfers from other Institutions 

No student will be accepted from another college with- 
out a transcript of college work from that institution, and 
no student may enroll in Armstrong Junior College who has 
been dropped from another institution or who is on pro- 
bation from another institution because of poor scholarship. 

A student transferring to Armstrong Junior College will 
have his credits reduced unless at least three-fourths of 
all grades received at another college are above the lowest 
passing grade of that college. If courses amounting to one- 
half a normal load are not passed with grades above the 
lowest passing grade, a transfer student will not be ac- 
cepted. 

Transfers to other Institutions 

No student will be recommended for transfer to other 
institutions unless three-fourths of all grades received at 
Armstrong are above D. 

Reports and Grades 

Reports of grades will be sent the student at the end 
cf each quarter. While the College feels that its dealings 
should be directly with the student, parents are urged to 
inform themselves as to the student's progress and to dis- 
cuss these reports with him. Student records in the Office 
of the Dean are, of course, always open to parents. 



o P S A V A X N A 11 . GEORGIA 19 

Grade A plus, Exceptional I honor points per 

course 

Grade A, Superior •"> honor points per 

course 

Grade B, Better than average - honor points per 

course 

Grade C, Average 1 honor point per 

course 

Grade D, Barely passing honor points per 

course 

Grade E, Incomplete Minus 1 honor point 

per course 

Grade F, Failure Minus 1 honor point 

per course 

Grade E (Incomplete) — An incomplete may be removed 
by means stipulated by the instructor of the course in which 
the student received the grade E. An E not removed in 
the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an F. 

An F can be removed only by repeating the course or 
passing a substitute course. Passing grades may not be im- 
proved by re-examination or by repeating the course. 

Honor Points 

The number of honor points a student receives is deter- 
mined by the grades he makes, each grade carrying a 
certain number of honor points, as explained above. In 
order to graduate, a student must receive as many honor 
points, based upon the above grading system, as the num- 
ber of courses required for graduation, and as many honor 
points as courses taken by the student. 

Honors 

Students who maintain an average of B or above in 
each course during a quarter's work will be placed on the 
Dean's Scholastic Attainment List. At the discretion of the 
Dean, special absence privileges may be granted to these 
students. 



20 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The 20 ( r of (1) advanced students and (2) students 
with less than six quarters work who have the highest 
averages, provided this average is "B" or better, and have 
tailed no courses, will be given special recognition on 
Honors Day. 

Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction) will be 
bestowed upon those receiving an average of 3 honor points 
per course. 

A valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class 
from among the five students with the highest scholastic 
average in the work completed before the term in which 
the students graduate. 

All students who receive recognition on Honors Day 
will have their names recorded on a permanent Dean's List 
in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. 

Perelstine Award 

Mr. Joseph Perelstine, prominent Savannah business 
man, makes an annual award to the senior student in Com- 
merce who achieves the highest scholastic average. The 
award is made on Honors Day. 

Cooperation with the Examiner of the 
University System of Georgia 

The University System of Georgia has inaugurated in 
certain courses a uniform examination plan under the super- 
vision of a trained technician. A number of these courses 
are offered by Armstrong Junior College. With the per- 
mission of the Examiner and the administration of the 
University System of Georgia, Armstrong has been per- 
mitted to cooperate in this testing program. 

Final Examinations 

1. Regular written examinations are required in all 
courses at the end of each quarter. These examinations are 
held on the last three or four days of the quarter, in ac- 
cordance with a permanent schedule. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 2] 

n. Final examinations, except in laboratory practice, 

are limited to a period of three hours. In courses in which 
a considerable portion of the examination is of a practical 

nature, the instructor may extend the time at his discretion. 

.*'>. Special examinations for students who have been 

Officially excused from regular examinations may be held 

at suitable times fixed by the instructors concerned. Such 
examinations must be taken within the succeeding quarter, 
and a fee of $3.00 will be assessed for each examination. 

Attendance Regulations 

Students are allowed three absences per course. Excess 
absences must be satisfactorily explained to the instructor 
in charge of the course or to the Dean, if class work is to 
continue. Special faculty action will be required before a 
student may receive credit on a course from which he has 
been absent eight or more times. 

Upon request, special absence privileges may be granted 
a student who is on the Dean's List, but the granting of such 
privileges is within the discretion of the Dean. 

A student who is absent from any class two days be- 
fore or after a holiday or the beginning or ending of a term 
will be assessed $1.00 for each day or part of a day absent. 

Rides on Personal Conduct 

Students are requested to maintain high standards of 
personal conduct and character. 

Withdrawals 
A formal withdrawal, presented in writing to the Dean, 
is a prerequisite to honorable dismissal or re-entrance to this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should im- 
mediately make such intentions known to the Dean. 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 
All students failing (except in cases excused before 
examinations on account of sickness) to pass at least one 
course other than physical education in any one quarter 



22 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

will be dropped from the rolls of the College. All students 
who fail to make an average of at least live honor points 
(not more than one honor point will be counted in this 
reckoning for physical education) during the first three 
quarters 1 work at the Junior College will not be allowed 
to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students 
with less than a "C" average at the end of the fourth 
quarter of college work, and at the end of the sixth quarter 
of college work a student must have an average of three- 
fourths an honor point per course in order to re-register. 

Number Required in Courses 

Unless at least fifteen students register for the course 
no course will be given without special action of the Dean. 

Student Activities 

Believing that self-discipline by the individual student 
has educational value, the faculty has endeavored to create 
an atmosphere of freedom around the College. The students 
have been free to form scholarly habits, to develop indi- 
vidual abilities and to practice self-restraint in a manner 
becoming adults. In keeping with this policy, which has 
been very successful so far, the faculty will place the same 
responsibilities upon and give the same freedom to in- 
coming freshmen. The faculty is unalterably opposed to 
hazing in any form. 

The College faculty and students will hold a series of 
closed dances throughout the year. 

The President and faculty will provide regulations for 
student organizations. Any student group desiring to hold 
any public meeting or social event in the name of the 
College or in the name of the student organizations must 
notify the Committee on Student Activities two weeks in ad- 
vance of the meeting and find a place on the calendar kept 
in the President's office. 



o P S A V A N X A H . G E o R G 1 A 28 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations 

1. Any group of students desiring to organize a social 
club must submit to the Faculty Committee on student Ac- 
tivities a petition for a charter. This petition should contain 
the following information : 

(1) Name of the proposed organization 

(2) Aims and purposes of the organization 

(3) Proposed regulations governing membership, 
initiation, and dues 

(4) Plan of organization 

(5) Proposed time and place of meeting 

(6) Name of proposed sponsor 

(7) Names of proposed members. 

2. No student may become a member of any social 
organization unless he or she has earned at least four honor 
points at Armstrong in the quarter preceding initiation. A 
student who has not earned the required number of honor 
points, but who has an average of "C" on three academic 
courses at mid-term, may, however, be pledged as a pros- 
pective member but may not enjoy full privileges of mem- 
bership until after formal initiation. 

3. No student shall be pledged as a prospective mem- 
ber of any social organization before the mid-term reports 
of his or her first quarter at Armstrong. 

4. All invitations to membership should be in writing. 
The invitation should be accepted or declined, in writing, 
within three days of the date upon which it is received. 
The reply to the invitation should be addressed to the 
Chairman of the Faculty Committee on Student Activities 
who will notify the organization and keep the replies on file. 

5. Any student organization desiring to give an enter- 
tainment shall notify the Chairman of the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Student Activities of such proposed entertainment 
at least two weeks in advance, stating, in writing, the nature 
of the entertainment, the time and place, and the chaperons 
to be invited. 

6. The sponsor of a social organization should not be 
a member of the faculty of the college. 



24 A R M STRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

ColU (ji Organizations, La-tuns, and Concerts 

The College sponsors a glee club, an orchestra, a council 
on foreign affairs, and dramatics. During the year these 
organizations present programs at student assemblies and, 
occasionally, to the public. All students showing ability 
and interest are eligible for membership in these organi- 
zations. 

Students of Armstrong are provided unusual opportuni- 
ties to hear some of the best lecturers in America as well as 
concert artists of ability. Through a special arrangement 
with the Savannah Community Forum, students of the 
College are permitted to attend six lectures during the fall 
and winter for the small fee of $1.00. These lectures are 
given in the college auditorium. 



The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship 

The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship was 
organized in January, 1939, as a college-community co- 
operative enterprise. The first institute was held on Febru- 
ary 2-3, 1939, and was open to the students and public 
without charge. A number of out-of-town speakers will ap- 
pear on future programs. The object of the Institute is to 
promote better citizenship. 



Aeronautics 

In cooperation with the Civil Aeronautics Authority of 
the United States and the Strachan Skyways, Inc., the 
Junior College is offering courses in ground and flight in- 
struction to a select number of students. 



Student Publications 

The official organ of the student body is the Inkwell and 
is published once a month. The Geechet is the College year 
book. 



P S A V A N N ; A II . 6 E R G 1 \ £5 

Thi Savannah Playhousi 

The Savannah Playhouse of Armstrong Junior College 
was founded in 1936 for the purpose of emphasizing the 
study of speech and of serving the student body and com- 
munity in the field of the drama and its allied ails. The 

playhouse thus provides opportunity for one to enrich his 
background in the drama and to participate in stage pro- 
ductions. 

It is the aim of this theatre to produce from time to 
time various forms of the drama which are worthy of the 
experimental theatre. 

Student experience in the many phases of the work of 
the Playhouse not only constitutes foundation work for ad- 
vanced study in the field, but develops a confidence in one's 
ability to think and speak correctly. 

Holidays 

The College calendar provides for holidays only at 
Christmas, and in the spring. One additional holiday will 
be granted when the faculty attends the meeting of the 
Georgia Education Association. Although the school will 
not suspend classes for other occasions, students desiring 
to recognize religious holidays may do so, and a limited 
number of absences is allowed for such occasions. 

Adult Education 

The College will offer afternoon or evening classes for 
adults. The same number of hours will be spent in these 
classes as is spent in those on the regular schedule. 



26 A R M S T R N G JUNIOR COLLEGE 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Certificates Granted 
The College will offer work leading to three different 
certificates: Associate in Liberal Arts, Associate in Homo 
Economics, and Associate in Finance and Commerce. Ap- 
plications for these certificates must be filed in the office 
of the Dean by April 1st. 

General Requirements for Graduation 

1. A student will be accepted as a candidate for gradu- 
ation only after the completion of 16-2 3 courses with an 
average of 1 honor point per course. 

2. In order to graduate a candidate must have to his 
credit as many honor points as the number of courses re- 
quired for graduation and as many honor points as the 
number of courses completed. (For an explanation of honor 
points, see "Honor Points," page 19. "Course" credit is ex- 
plained on page 18.) 

3. Not more than ten courses (33-1 3 semester hours) 
will be accepted from another institution toward the com- 
pletion of w T ork on a certificate, and all transfer students 
must remain in residence for nine consecutive months, re- 
gardless of the number of credits received elsewhere. Under 
all circumstances the student must attend the Junior College 
during the last quarter when work is completed on a cer- 
tificate. 

4. A student transferring to Armstrong will have his 
credits reduced if more than one-fourth of all grades re- 
ceived at another college are the lowest passing grade in 
that college. 

Liberal Arts 
The Liberal Arts course is designed for those students 
who desire a broad educational background ; it is concerned 
with man and with the achievements of civilization. The 
course deals with man's natural, social, and cultural history 
and seeks to give the student an understanding of the past 
and its relationship to the present. 



OF S A V A N N A ll , 6E0RG1 A ^ 

When he Has completed the course, the student is ex- 
pected to have some knowledge of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of natural science, of the great movements which 
have directed the course of civilization, and of the artistic 

and literary masterpieces of the world. The student is then 

ready to specialize in any field he chooses — natural or 
social science, Literature, art or commerce. If, however, the 

student does not expect to continue his education further 
in college, he is ready to go into his life's work better able 
to understand and to see in their proper relationships the 
problems of life and of society, and to appreciate more fully 
man's achievements and aspirations. 

By a proper selection of electives, liberal arts students 
may prepare themselves for the technical and professional 
courses in senior colleges. Correspondence with the senior 
college concerned should be undertaken by the student in 
planning such a course of study. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Liberal Arts 

Quarter hours 

Social Science . . 2-3 10 

Biology .... 11-12 10 

Humanities ... 1-2 (or 2 courses 

in English) . . 10 

English .... 11-12 10 

Foreign Language * 10 

Mathematics 5 

Political Science . 12 (or Social 

Science 4) . . 5 

Physical Education 10 

Library Science . . 1 2 

Total specified 72 

Electives 30 

Total for graduation 102 

* Students who have had two high school units in French must 
schedule French 3-4. Those students offering three units must 
schedule two of the following: French 4, 5, G. 



28 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Home Economics 
In view of the fact that an appreciation of the problems 
of home making is desirable for all young women whether 
they continue work at a senior college or not, the Home 
Economics course at Armstrong Junior College is designed 
to help the greatest number, and, at the same time, satisfy 
the requirements of the senior college for those who wish 
to major in home economics. The work beyond the general 
core courses will be taken in the field of home economics 
and closely related subjects. 

The entrance requirements to the home economics 
course are the same as for the liberal arts and commerce 
courses. 

With the exception of Dietetics and the course in meal 
planning and table service, home economics courses have 
been planned without prerequisite. The four courses select- 
ed in home economics are those that will give a broad train- 
ing, fit the girls for home making, and give them a richer 
life. 

The home economics clothing laboratory is splendidly 
equipped. The foods laboratory has five home kitchens and 
an attractive serving-unit. 



Course Requirements for Graduation 
Home Economics 

Quarter hours 

Art 11 5 

Biology .... 11-12 10 

Chemistry ... 1-2 10 

English .... 11-12 10 

Home Economics . 1, 2, 3 and 5 . . . 20 
Humanities . . . 1-2 (or 2 courses 

in English) . . 10 

Mathematics . . 1 5 

Political Science . 12 (or Social 

Science 4) . . 5 

Physical Education 1-2 10 



OF S A V A \ \ A H , (i E R G I A 29 

Social Science . . 2-3 LO 

Sociology . . . <j () 5 

Library Science I - 

Total specified 102 

Total for graduation L02 

Finance caul Comm< ra 

The Junior College offers a three-year course leading 
to an Associate in Finance and Commerce diploma. The 
entrance requirements are the same as for other courses 
offered in Armstrong Junior College. 

The course of study that has been devised is expected 
to aid the student in understanding himself and society, 
to give him some knowledge of the way the world of finance, 
industry, and trade operates, and to provide some train- 
ing in the techniques of business. Before graduation the 
student will be required to pass a test in shorthand and 
typing. 

The three-year course of study outlined below has been 
constructed to meet the needs of those who will participate 
in the life of the business community, remembering that 
Savannah is an important sea port and financial center. As 
the work is of a terminal nature, i.e., a complete course with- 
in itself which gives technical training in a specified field, 
only those students who wish to complete their work at the 
Junior College will be advised to take this course. If any 
student desires a four-year course in finance and commerce, 
he should pursue liberal arts at the Junior College with 
electives in economics, psychology, and accounting, and 
transfer to a senior college after two years at Armstrong. 

By meeting all liberal arts requirements, a commerce 
student may receive a certificate in liberal arts at the end 
of the second year; one additional year's work will be re- 
quired for the diploma in finance and commerce. 



30 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Finance and Commerce 

First Year 

Quarter hours 

Social Science . . 2-3 10 

Human Biology .11-12 10 

Economics ... 21 5 

English .... 11-12 10 

Mathematics . . 7 and 14 .... 10 
Physical Education or Shorthand 

or Typing . . . 4 to 6 
Library Economics 1 2 

Total 51 to 53 

Second Year 

Commerce . . . 2-3-4 15 

Foreign Language 10 

Humanities . . . 1-2 10 

Social Science . . 4 or 12 5 

Psychology ... 31 5 

Physical Education or Shorthand 

or Typing .... 5 

Total 50 

Third Year 

Commerce . . . 5,7,10,11,12 . . 25 
Electives 20 

Total ~45 



P S A V A \ \ A 11 , 6E0RG1 \ :'.i 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

DI VIS! N () F II U M A N I T I ES 

English 

3. Business Writing Practice 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

1. Introduction to Poetry (not offered 1940-41) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course deals with the history of English poetry, a 
study of the various types and forms, and a reading and 
understanding of representative works from the leading 
English and American poets. 

5. Play Production 

5 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory work a week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

This course includes a fundamental study of production 
methods with emphasis upon the technical aspects of pro- 
ducing plays in the modern theatre, such as: the physical 
theatre, brief history of the physical development of the 
theatre, stage craft, construction of settings, stage lighting, 
stage costuming, and stage make-up. Each member of the 
production class will be required to w r ork on a minimum 
of one crew during the term. 

6. Play Production 

5 hours lecture a week for one quarter. 

This course is an advanced production course in the 
study of play directing and acting, devoted both to the his- 
torical and contemporary theatre. 

7. Public Speaking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A fundamental course designed to develop the public 
speaker. Emphasis is placed upon platform delivery and 
elements governing effective speaking in audience relation- 
ship. 

11-12. Freshman English 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 



32 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The course has a two-fold objective : to teach the stu- 
dent to grasp the ideas of others through learning to read 
intelligently, and to teach him to express his own ideas 
logically and forcefully in speech and in writing. Particu- 
lar emphasis is placed on acquiring a complete and usable 
vocabulary. Formal grammar, punctuation and spelling are 
applied in the papers and reports prepared by the students. 
Several novels and biographies are used as collateral 
reading. A considerable pail of the course will be devoted 
to oral English. 

Humanities 
1-2. Humanities 

5 hours lecture a week for two quarters. Re- 
quired of all students planning to attend the Uni- 
versity System. 

A survey of the cultural achievements of Western Civili- 
zation. The course seeks to give the student a general under- 
standing of the leading intellectual and esthetic movements 
of Western Europe and an acquaintance with the greatest 
literary figures from Homer to Galsworthy. 

Art 

11. Art Principles and Design 

2 lectures and 8 hours laboratory work a week 
for one quarter. Fee $2.50. 

A study of fundamental principles underlying all art. 
Laboratory work in the use of line, mass, and color. Intro- 
duction to color theory and lettering. 

French 

1-2. Elementary French 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

The elements of French grammar are studied with a 
view to early reading. Some 450 pages of classroom and 
collateral readings are completed. Attention is given to 
pronunciation, composition, and conversation. 






o p S \ V a \ \ A ll . G E O R G 1 a 

No credit will be allowed until French 2 is completed. 

8, [ntermediate French 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
Review grammar with continued stress on composition 

and oral practico. Reading' of 400 pages of standard texts. 

7. Nineteenth Century French Prose 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A survey of the prose writings of the nineteenth century. 
Reading and discussion of 500 pages from representative 

writers. Reports on collateral reading. 

8. French Classical Drama 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
Representative plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 
Four plays to be read in class and four plays to be read as 
collateral. 

9. French Short Stories 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of the short story in France. 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
AND MATHEMATICS 

Biological Sciences 

3. Invertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 
3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

A study of invertebrate animals including local fresh 
water and marine forms. 

4. General Vertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 
11-12) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

An intensive study of the vertebrate group including 
laboratory dissection of several types. The study will in- 
clude the kinds of vertebrates and their distribution in time 



34 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

and space, vertebrate embryology, and details of the 
various vertebrate organ systems. 

11-12. Human Biology 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Materials fee 
$1.00. (No refund.) 

This course is designed to give the student an under- 
standing of general biological principles, particularly as 
applied to the human organism. The first half of the course 
includes a study of fundamental facts of biology, human 
anatomy, and physiology. The second half of the course 
includes studies in problems of public health, reproduction, 
and the principles of genetics, evolution, and eugenics. 

Physical Sciences 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit 

$2.50. 

The first course is a study of the preparation, properties, 
and uses of a number of the non-metallic elements and their 
compounds. The fundamental laws of elementary inorganic 
chemistry are stressed. 

The second course is a continuation of Chemistry 1, and 
includes the preparation, properties, and uses of the more 
common metallic elements and their compounds. The 
laboratory work will offer several experiments which will 
serve as an introduction to qualitative and quantitative 
analysis. Students who have had a course in high school 
chemistry will schedule chemistry the fifth period; all 
others the fourth period. 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 1-2) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit $2.50. 

The text used is by Louis J. Curtman. The lectures will 
deal with the theoretical aspects of the subject with special 



() F S AY \ \ \ A II . G E R G 1 A 

reference to the application of the law of mass action. The 
laboratory work will consist of a study of the reactions, 
precipitations, and detections of the principal metals and 

acid radicals. 

2 1-22. General Physics (not offered L940-41) 

1 hours lecture, (> hours laboratory work per 
week for two quarters. Laboratory foe $2.50. 
Deposit $2.50. 

This course is a study of the properties of matter, 
mechanics of solids, mechanics of fluids and heat, sound, 
light, and electricity. 

11-12. Physical Science 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Required of 
all students planning to attend the University 
System of Georgia. Materials fee $1.00. (No 
refund.) 

This course is a survey of the Physical Sciences. The 
subject matter is taken from the fields of physics, chemistry, 
astronomy, geology, and geography. In general, the objec- 
tives of the course are to make one more familiar with the 
physical phenomena of our environment ; to develop an ap- 
preciation of the scientific method ; and to furnish a cultural 
and general informational background which may be used 
as a foundation for future work by those students whose 
interests may lie in the field of the Physical Sciences. 

Mathematics 

1. A survey of Mathematics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The purpose of this course is to show how from mathe- 
matical ideas, are built broad logical theories which have 
wide application in the sciences and philosophy ; and to 
show that the development of mathematics from ancient to 
modern times has been an important factor in civilization. 

2-3-4. College Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic 
Geometry 
5 hours a week for three quarters. 



3G A RMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Course - is a study of quadratics; ratio, proportion, and 
variation; the binomial theorem; complex numbers; theory 
of equations; determinants; Logarithms and the slide-rule; 
and permutations, combinations, and probability. Course 3 
is a study of plane and spherical trigonometry and analytics 
through the circle. Course 4 completes the study of the 
plane and solid analytics. 

5. Differential Calculus 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course includes derivatives of algebraic and trans- 
cendental functions; maxima and minima; rates, velocity, 
and acceleration ; the definite integral, and its application to 
areas, and volumes of revolution ; and series. 

6. Integral Calculus 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course is a continuation of Mathematics 5. It in- 
cludes methods of integration ; single and multiple integrals; 
partial and total differentials with physical and geometrical 
applications. 

7. Mathematics of Finance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course includes simple and compound interest; 
annuities; amortization and sinking funds; bond valuation; 
and life insurance. 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

History 

2-3. Western Civilization 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

A survey of Western culture with emphasis on the his- 
torical development of major social institutions. Consider- 
able time is devoted to a study of background material use- 
ful in making an approach to the understanding of world 
trends today. 



P S A V A \ N A II , G K ORGU 37 

4. Contemporary ( Georgia 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The economic, social, and political problems of Georgia 
are studied with particular emphasis on regional and nation- 
al problems which impinge, either directly or indirectly, on 
our state. Human and natural resources, the conditions of 
agriculture and industry, and problems of state and local 
governments are surveyed. 

5. English History (not offered L940-41) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Particular emphasis will be placed upon English back- 
grounds of American history. 

Political Science 

12. American Government and Politics 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Principal emphasis is placed upon principles, processes, 
and problems, with some attention given to political de- 
velopments under the New Deal. 

Economics 

21. Introductory Economics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A course which introduces the student to economic con- 
cepts and principles with due attention to modern economic 
institutions and problems. 

Psychology 

31. Introductory Psychology 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

An introduction to the scientific study of mental life. 

Sociology 

60. The Family 

5 hours a w T eek for one quarter. 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

A study of factors which have made for permanency in 
family life; changing social and economic conditions which 
affect family members in their relations with each other 
and the community; survivals of various characteristics 
affecting family life and consideration of their worth ; con- 
servation of the family and education for family life. 

DIVISION OF FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

1. Introduction to Business Organization (not offered 
1940-41) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce 1 is designed to introduce students to the 
field of business organization and management. A descrip- 
tion of the structure and functions of modern business is 
presented and an insight given into the fields or divisions 
of business. Careful attention is given to a study of the 
importance and scope of each field and its relation to the 
other fields of work emphasized. 

2-3. Accounting 

3 hours lectures and 4 hours laboratory a week 
for two quarters. 

Principles of single proprietorship, partnership, and 
corporation accounting; the balance sheet, profit and loss 
statements, and the theory of debits and credits. In course 
3 intermediate accounting will be covered. 

4. Accounting Problems 

3 lectures and 4 hours laboratory a week. 

5. Marketing 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A general critical survey of the field of marketing and 
consumer demand in relation to the marketing machinery. 
Functions, methods, policies, marketing costs, and the 
problems of the farmer, manufacturer, wholesaler, com- 
mission merchant, broker, retailer, and other middlemen. 
Emphasis on principles, trends, and policies in relation to 
marketing efficiency. 



1 1 r S A V A N nam, G E O R G 1 \ 

»;. Marketing (not offered L9 10- 1 1 ) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Special attention is given means, methods, and problem) 

relating to retailing. Some attention is devoted to credits 
and collections. 

7. Money and Banking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the principles, functions, and forms of money 
and credit; analysis of money and credit problems; theory 
of money and banking; and banking practices. 

8. Business Finance (not offered 1940-41) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of business financial organization with special 
attention to the corporation ; management of capital ; prob- 
lems of financial administration and securities; analysis of 
causes of failures. 

9. Marketing (not offered 1940-41) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A course in salesmanship and advertising. 

10. Insurance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of life, fire, health, and accident insurance; 
employer's liability, title and credit insurance ; and insur- 
ance and bonding companies. 

11-12. Business Law 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

A brief study of law from the business man's standpoint 
dealing with such subjects as contracts, wills, sales, negoti- 
able instruments. Attention is given to the historic and 
economic development of certain principles of commercial 
usage. Where Georgia statutes and practices are at variance 
with those of other states, the Georgia rules are emphasized. 

14. Elements of Statistics (Prerequisite Mathematics 
1 or 7) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 



40 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The collection, classification, and presentation of numer- 
ical data. 

31-32. Field Work 

Fifteen hours per week for two quarters 
Credit, 10 quarter hours. 

This course has served as a means of bridging the gap 

that exists between the School of Finance and Commerce 
and the actual business world. All third year finance and 
commerce students, interested in registering for this course, 
make application for such at the beginning of the school 
year. Arrangement is made for those applicants acceptable 
by the instructor to work as internes in Savannah business 
organizations. Students make confidential monthly reports, 
along with other assigned projects, to the instructor, while 
at the same time confidential monthly reports are being 
made on the work of the internes by his or her employer. 
Although this is a field in which Armstrong is pioneering, 
the program has been very successful in the past. This 
success has been primarily due to the cooperation of Savan- 
nah business men and their interest in a high type of 
personnel. 

41. a, b, c, Typing 

Two hours class room work and 3 to 4 hours prac- 
tice each week during the Fall, Winter, and Spring 
quarters. Credit 6 quarter hours. Laboratory fee 
$10.00. No refund will be made to students per- 
mitted to drop this course. 

A student may drop this course after completing 41 a 
and b and receive 4 quarter hours credit. 

42. a, b, c, Shorthand 

Two hours class room work and 3 to 4 hours prac- 
tice each week during the Fall, Winter, and Spring 
quarters. Credit 6 quarter hours. Laboratory fee 
is $4.00 for 42 c, given in the Spring quarter. 

A student may drop this course after completing 42 a and 
b and receive 4 quarter hours credit. 42 c is a course in 
transcription. 



o F S A V A N N A ll , GEORGIA 41 

DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Clothing 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 

quarter. 

This course is designed to establish appreciations, inter- 
ests, habits, and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, 
design, construction, and care of clothing. Problems are 
provided so that students gain actual experience in ap- 
plication of these fundamental principles. The clothing 
budget is studied as an aid in obtaining the greatest satis- 
faction from the money spent for clothing. 

2. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A study of food emphasizing its selection and prepara- 
tion, applying fundamental scientific principles. A unit in 
marketing will present actual problems of consumer, ob- 
servation of marketing conditions, factors affecting price, 
grades, brands of food, and training for more intelligent 
buying. The unit in common foods and their preparation 
acts as a basis for further meal preparation. 

3. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A continuation of foods including different types of 
dishes used for specific purposes, food selection, meal 
planning, and table service. Students gain actual experience 
in all forms of family entertaining such as family meals, 
buffets, teas and receptions. 

5. Home Planning and Furnishing 

4 lectures, 2 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. 

A study of planning and furnishing the home from the 
standpoint of family needs; modern tendencies in housing 
and application of principles of art to home furnishing ; a 
short history of architecture ; location of house ; study of 
floor plans, exteriors, grounds, furnishings of various rooms 
emphasizing heating and lighting and treatment of walls. 



42 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

floors, windows, together with selection and arrangement 
of furnishings. A short study of house care and manage- 
ment will be made. 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
LIBRARY SCIENCE AND AERONAUTICS 

1. Freshman Physical Education 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 
One course, special lectures. Games and various group 
activities to meet individual needs indicated by medical and 
physical examination and previous physical education. 
Follow-up physical examinations, conferences, and health 
lectures. 

2. Sophomore Physical Education 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 
One course, special lectures. Continuation of Physical 
Education 1. A wider choice of activities is permitted. 

3. Dancing 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 
An appreciation of the dance as an art. Corrective 
exercises for posture and balance. 

4. Advanced Dancing 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 

Intermediate ballet combinations, character dancing, 
brief study of the modern technique of dancing. 

The dancing classes are conducted by Ebba Oleson 
Thomson, who was formerly a pupil of Margit Tarassof, 
Michael Fokine, Albertina Rasch and Raymond Bott. 

Library Science 

1. 2 hours a week for one quarter. 2 hours credit. 

A short course in the facilities and use of the library is 
required of all freshmen. Instruction in bibliography making 
and note taking are included in this course. 

Aeronautics 

21. Ground Instruction 

6 hours a week for one quarter. 

22. Flight Instruction 

3 hours a week for one quarter. 






S A V A N N A H 



GEORGIA 



L* 



GRADUATES, L939 
ASSOCIATE l\ FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

John Larsen DuPoilt John Nicholas McLaughlin 

Arthur Herman Cranman 



ASSOCIATE 
Bainbridge, Betty 
Barbee, Gertrude 
Blackwell, Martha 
Blitch, Wilder 
Bowyer, Morehouse 
Boyce, Mary 
Burke, Marguerite 
Campbell, Decatur 
Crisfield, Mary 
Dodd, Elizabeth 
Draughon, Mytrice 
Dutton, Margaret 
Edwards, Anita 
Edwards, Elizabeth 
Falk, Doris 
Fonseca, Frank 
Fox, Sarah 

Goette, Mary Bernard 
Googe, Henrietta 
Guill, Ann 
Harms, Lucy 
Helmken, Maree 
Heyman, Jeannette 
Hipson, Jeanne 
Hodges, Geneva 



IX LIBERAL ARTS 

Hodges, .James 
Hyrne, Jonathan 
Irby, Eleanor 
Kaufmann, Caroline 
Kravitch, Phyllis 
Lamas, Andrew 
MacFeeley, Constance 
Mallory, Mildred 
Michels, Julian 
Miller, Robert 
Miller, William 
Morgan, Caryl 
Nichols, Fenwick 
Richman, Joseph 
Rossiter, Jule 
Rubin, Saul 
Sallette, Laura 
Sharpley, Helen 
Simpson, John 
Stevens, Thomas 
Tregone, Frances 
Turner, Leslie 
Waldrop, Charles 
Walsh, Thomas 
Wimberly, Olin 



ASSOCIATE IN HOME ECONOMICS 



Bumann, Virginia 
Holliman, Evalena 
Laird, Jean 



Rhodes, Dorothy 
Stevens, Elizabeth 
Wootton, Amelia 



STUDENTS ENROLLED YEAR 1939-40 



Total Number Advanced Students 
Total Number First Year Students 
Adult Students 



134 

156 

68 



Grand Total 



358 



11 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



ADVANCED STUDENTS 



Adams, Robert 
Alexander, Ruth 
Anderson, Prances 
Aranda, [mogene 
Arden, Virginia 
Arkin, Marvin 
Arnau, Maudine 

B 

Baggs, Edwin 

Bailey, Sam 
Bainbridge, Betty 
Baker, Elinor 
Ball, Carolyn 
Barton, Norman 
Bennett, Lee 
Berry, Bernice 
Bland, Lillie Mae 
Blumenthal, Herbert 
Boyd, Eleanor 
Brushwood, Chester 
Bumann, Caroline 
Byington, Betsy 
Byrd, Jane 
Byrnes, Arthur 



Cartwright, Sadie 
Christian, Joseph 
Christiansen, Ruth 
Clinton, Ann 
Cohen, A. J. 
Cole, Nancy 
Cone, William 
Cory, Ellen 
Cronemiller, George 
Crosby, Jayne 
Ci umbley, Betty 



Davis, Arthur 
Davis, Hasseltine 
Davis, Robert 
DeLoach, Robert 
Driggers, Mae 



Edel, Helen 
Elmore, David 



Farrell, Margaret 
Fawcett, Dorothy 
Fennell, Anita 
Fordham, Leon 
Freeman, Helen 



Gardner, John 
Gardner, Sam 
Glass, William 
Gnann, Frances 
Gooch, Pauline 
Gordon, Robert 
Griffin, George 

H 
Hadsell, Louise 
Harms, Madeleine 
Hart, Gordon 
Hesse, Jean 
Holbrook, Mary 
Holt, Elmo 
Howard, May 
Hutto, Monroe 
Hyrne, Jonathan 



Ihley, Richard 
Irby, Eleanor 

J 
James, Frances 

K 
King, Frances 
Klingon, Ruth 

L 

Lang, Aaron 
Langston, Alex 
Laughlin, Heath 
Lee, Wright 
Lennox, Edwin 
Longwater, Leon 



F S A \ A \ \ \ II 



GEORGIA 



\ 



ADVANCED STUDENTS (Continued) 



M 
McCauley, John 
McCreery, Elizabeth 
McFarland, Beverly 
McLaughlin, Robert 
McPeters, Mary 
Maner, Prank 
Meddin, Adele 
Meisner, Agnes 
Moore, Jesse 
Mosley, Marjorie 
Murray, Ernestine 
Myers, Betsy 

N 
Newton, Byron 

O 
Odrezin, David 



Parker, Dorothy 
Perdomo, Marta 
Perfect, Evelyn 
Picard, Harry 
Pinckney, Vincent 
Powell, Carleton 
Powers, Marie 
Price, Thomas 

Q 

Quirk, Brother William V. 



Rabb, Caroline 
Ranitz, Catherine 
Reagan, William 
Reed, James 
Reid, William 
Rice, Marion 



Riedel, Augustus 
Roane, Nathan 
Robertson, Sieg\ art 
Rogers, John S. 
Rolison, Estelle 
Rosenzweig, Lillian 
Rubin, Florence 

s 

Sadler, Barney 
Schwanebeck, Alfred 
Schweizer, Carol 

Scott, Jane 
Seawright, Eunice 
Simmons, Mary 
Simpson, Fred 
Smallbones, Kathryn 
Smith, Constancia 
Smith, Margaret 
Solana, Elizabeth 
Stoughton, Owen 
Street, Frances 



Tietjen, Eleanor 
Tilson, Geraldine 
Tyre, Donell 



Vannerson, Frances 

W 
Walker, Howell 
Walker, Julaine 
Whittle, Joseph 
Wilkerson, Sarah 
Williams, Jack 
Wilson, Claude 
Wolfe, Saxton 
Wortsman, Elise 
Wright, Jane 



46 



A R M S TRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 



Addy, Bernard 
Alderman, Ruth 
Allen, George L. 
Allen, Judson 

B 
Babanats, Ernest 
Bacon, Katherine I!. 
Bailey, O'Bannon 
I laker, Dorothy 
Baker, Kenneth 
Barnett, David 
Beckett, Julia 
Behnken, William 
Bentley, Doris 
Bentley, James 
Bidez, Miriam 
Black, Sarah M. 
Blair, Emil 
Blanton, Nell 
Bock, Elizabeth 
Bowyer, Lucy 
Boyd, Gretchen 
Boyd, Margaret 
Bragg", Vernon 
Brennan, Elizabeth 
Brewer, Jean 
Bryan, Linda 
Buntyn, Marjorie 
Burke, Frances 
Burton, Frances 
Bythewood, Courtenay 



Cargill, Ruth 
Clemens, Emma 
Coffee, Marjorie 
Collins, Emma Frances 
Collins, Merle 
Coyle, William 
Craig, Joseph 
Crawford, Robert 

D 
Davenport, James 
Davis, Harriet 



DeLoache, George 
I )i ncrman, Sam 
Douglas, Margaret 
Dubois, Joseph 



Ellis, Frances 
Elmore, Miriam 
Engel, Bernyce 
Evans, Geraldine 
Eve, Flora 



Feagin, Gladys 
Feuger, Mary 
Finch, Dorothy 
Finney, Raymond 
Flythe, Thomas 
Foran, Thomas 
Forehand, Jack 
Fowler, Katharine 
Fraser, Adelaide 
Futral, Herschel 



Gabriel, Rex 
Genone, Joseph 
Glover, Shirley 
Gnann, Arthur 
Graham, Leonclla 
Graham, Paul 
Grayson, Hennie 
Griffin, Sarah 
Guy, James 

H 
Hahn, Martha 
Haile, Margaret 
Hall, Wannelle 
Hamilton, Rose Ann 
Hamlet, Alice Louise 
Hanson, Howell 
Hardy, Jack 
Hester, Bobby 
Hill, Alethia 
Hinely, Mary 
Hitt, Roy 



G A V A \ \ \ H 



6 E R G 1 \ 



17 



I [RST \ EAR 

H 

Hodge, l>. B. 
Hoffman, Prank 
Hogeboom, Mary 
Mollis, Virginia 
Holloman, William 
Holm, Jeanne 
Holmes, WiUie K. 
Holt. Frank 
Hopkins, Jane IK 
Howarth, Alberta 
Hoynes. Elizabeth 



Jaudon, Jack 
J< nkins, Joseph 

K 
Karsner, Ethel 
Kent, Sadie 
Kicklighter, Clyde 
Kieffer, Jack 
Kleeman, Carl 
Klingon, Joseph 
Kolb, Annie M. L. 
Kienson, Martha 



Langford, Ruth 

Lasky, Annette 
Lebey, Sterly 
Lee, Cater 
Levington, Helen 
Lewis, Janie Belle 
Livingston, Joseph 
Lowe, Walter 
Lynah, Mrs. J. H. 

M 

McCall, George 
McClesky, Lamar 
Mclntire, Francis 
McManus, Joseph 
McMillan, Betty 
Marines, Robert 
Marshall, Julia Ann 
Meeks, Marilyn 



sill >ENTS (Continued) 

Mendes, Joseph 
Middleton, David 
Miller, Hugh 
Monsalvatge, Raymond 
Moore, Catherine 
Morrison, Manha 
Mulligan, Bernard 
Mullryne, Mary 
Murphy, Margaret 

N 

Nash, Dearing 

Newman, Ellen 
North, Jean 
Nugent, Ella 



Oliver, Amy S. 
Oliver, Etta 
Oplinger, Horace 
Owens, Sara 



Parker, Eloise 
Parker, Laura 
Patterson, James 
Patterson, Jeanne 
Penney, William 
Pcveler, Richard 
Pike, Henry 
Prescott, Virginia 
Pritcher, Gerald 

Q 

Quattlebaum, Lilli 



Ralston, Adaline 
Ray, Henry 
Register, Melva 
Reiser, Frederick 
Rentz, Margaret 
Rentz, Mary 
Reynolds, Elaine 
Reynolds, Margaret 
Reynolds, Perry 
Rhoden, Vasco 



48 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS— (Continw d) 



R 
Rich, Marjorie 
Roberts, Zaida 
Robinson, Con 
Rodgers, Miller 
Rogers, Vera 
Rutledge, Eleanor 



Saussy, Jean 
Schley, Helen 
Sehweizer, Elsa 
Shepherd, Edwin 
Sikes, Sam 
Simon, Charles 
Simon, Dyna 
Slawson, Ward 
Smith, Irene 
Smith, Louise 
Smith, Martha C. 
Smith, Walter 
Speir, Ima 
Speir, Valmore 
Stults, Barbara 
Sweatt, William 



Taylor, Mary 
Thomas, Dorothy 



Thompson, Lynette 
Turner, Cleve 
Tuten, Terrell 

T. on, Jack 



Underwood, Lucile 



Vandivere, Mary 
Victor, Irving 

W 

Wallace, James 
Wallace, Margaret 
Walsh, Kate A. 
Waters, Joseph 
Weatherly, Earl 
Weil, Marx 
White, Margaret 
Wilensky, Rolla 
Williams, Charles 
Wilson, Anne 
Winn, Clarence 
Wolfe, Earl 

Y 

Yarber, Ruth 
Young, Richard 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



BULLETIN OF 

ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 
COLLEGE n 1941-1942 

\ City Supported Junior College of Savannah, Georgia 



7$. 02 
13S 

to 



Volume VI (H Number 1 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1941-1942 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 

A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




1 8336 



MEMBERSHIP IN 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 







1 



M* 



. 



! ^&>^ 




LANE BUILDING 




AUDITORIUM BUILDING 



CALENDAR 1941—1942 



Fall Quarter 

Factulay meeting, 4:00 P. M. . . . Wednesday, September 17 
Freshman assembly in 

Auditorium, 9:00 A. M. . . . Thursday, September 18 

Freshman registration Thursday, September 18 

Freshman preliminary tests . . Friday-Saturday, September 19-20 

Upperclassman registration Friday, September 19 

Opening Exercises Monday, September 22 

All Classes begin Monday, September 22 

Test Friday, October 1 7 

Faculty meeting- Friday, October 24 

Armistice Day address Tuesday, November 11 

Playhouse production . . Tuesday-Saturday, November 11-15 

Test Wednesday, November 19 

Thanksgiving- holidays . . Thursday-Saturday, November 2<»-22 
Examinations .... Wednesday-Friday, December L7-19 
Christmas holidays December 22-Januai. 

Winter Quarter 

Registration Monday, January 5 

All classes begin Tuesday, January 6 

Test Friday, January 30 

Faculty meeting Wednesday, February 4 

Institute of Citizenship . . . Thursday-Friday, February 5-6 

Playhouse production . . Tuesday-Saturday, February 17-22 

Test Friday, February 2 7 

Examinations Monday-Thursday, March 10-19 

Winter quarter closes Thursday, March 19 

Spring Quarter 

Registration Monday, March 23 

All classes begin Tuesday, March 24 

Georgia Educational Association 

Meeting — classes suspended To be announced 

Test Friday, April 17 

Faculty meeting Wednesday, April 22 

Playhouse production Tuesday-Saturday, May 19-23 

Examinations Monday-Thursday, June 1-4 

Faculty meeting Friday, June 5 

President's reception Friday, June 5 

Sophomore-Alumni luncheon and homecoming . . Saturday, June f) 
Graduation exercises Monday, June 8 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

( r< in ral Information Pag 

Calendar L941-1942 6 

The College Commission 9 

The Faculty 9 

History of the College l i 

Library 13 

Tin' College Book Store L3 

Gifts to the College L3 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 15 

Requirements for Admission 1(1 

Foes and Refunds 17 

Enrollment Procedure 18 

Testing and Guidance 19 

Student Load 19 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 19 

Explanation of Course Credit li) 

Transfers from Other Institutions 20 

Transfers to Other Institutions 20 

Reports and Grades 20 

Honor Points 21 

Honors 21 

Perelstine Award 22 

Co-operation with the Examiner 22 

Pinal Examinations 22 

Attendance Regulations 22 

Rules on Personal Conduct 23 

Withdrawals 23 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 23 

Number Required in Courses 24 

Student Activities 24 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations 24 

Lectures and Concerts 20 

The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship .... 20 

Aeronautics 20 

Student Organizations 20 

The Savannah Playhouse 31 

Holidays 31 

Adult Education . . 31 



T \ M I I : OF CONTENTS (Continued) 

Study Page 

Certificates Granted 32 

Crucial Requirement* for Graduation 32 

Libera] Arts 82 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Liberal Ait.- .... 33 

Home Economics 34 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Home Economics . . . 34 

Finance and Commerce 35 

Course Requirements for Graduation, Finance and Commerce 

Coursi Di scriptions 

Division of Human it i< 36 

English 

Humanities 37 

Ait 37 

French 

Spanish 38 

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 39 

Biological Sciences 39 

Physical Sciences 39 

Mathematics 41 

Division of Social Science- 42 

History 42 

Political Science 43 

Economics 43 

Psychology 43 

Sociology 4.". 

Division of Finance and Commerce 44 

Division of Home Economics 46 

Courses in Physical Education, Library Science and Aeronautic-.- 47 

Students Graduating, L939-40 48 

Students Enrolled, 1940-41 49 



o F S \ \ \ N \ A ll , GEORGIA 



THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Herschel V. Jenkins Vice-Chairman 

Michael J. Egan William Murphby 

Thomas GAMBLE, Ex officio MRS. Ll CY B. TROSDAL 

Herbert I .. Kayton Mrs. Charles D. Russell 

John I.. SuTLTVE. Ex officio 



THE FACULTY 

J. Thomas Askew. Ph.B., M.A. . . President 
Reuben W. Holland, A.B., M.A., 

Registrar and Treasurer 

BETTY BuRDETTE BAIN, B.S. H.E.Ed., University of Maryland; JM. S., 
Cornell University. 

Instructor in Home Economics. 

John P. Dyer, B.A., Bryson College; M.A., Peabody College; Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University. 

Instructor in Social Sciences. 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., Mercer University; M.S., Emory University. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

Lulie Henderson, A.B. in Education, University of Georgia; A.B. in 
Library Science, Emory University. 

Librarian. 



Reuben W. Holland, A.B. and M.A., Emory University. 
Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Stacy Reach, B.S. and M.A., Northwestern University. 
Instructor in English. 

Charles B. Kestler, A.B. and M.A., University of North Carolina. 
Instructor in English. 

Arthur T. Kolgaklis, B.S.C., Georgia School of Technology; M.B.A., 
Harvard University. 

Instructor in Commerce. 

Ben Thomas Painter, B.S., College of William and Mary; M.A. and 
Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Instructor in Biology. 



m ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

ROBERT M. STRAHL, li.S.C. and M.A., Ohio State University. 

Instructor in Finance and Commerce. 

Charles \v. Williams, a. B m Harvard University; M.A., University of 
Maryland. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

NELTA BECKETT, Associate iii Liberal Arts, Armstrong Junior College. 
S. T. C, Gregg College. 

Secretary and Instructor in Typewriting and Short- 
In met. 

MERLE MASSENGALE BRUCE, R.S., Birmingham-Southern College. 

Secretary and Assista?it Treasurer, 



1 SAVANNAH, GEORGIA i i 

HISTORY, ORGANIZATION, AND AIMS 

For the past few years, Savannah and the surrounding 
community have felt the need for an institution of higher 
learning. Realizing that there is an increasing number of 
young men and women who find it inconvenient or inad- 
visable to continue their education at out-of-town colleges, 
Mayor Thomas Gamble and a group of leading citizens 
conceived the idea of establishing a junior college in 
Savannah. These men, working tirelessly over a period of 
months, finally saw their hopes become an actuality when 
on May 27, 1935, the city council authorized the establish- 
ment of a municipally supported junior college to be 
governed temporarily by a commission of fourteen members 
appointed by the mayor. The first commission was com- 
posed of the following leading Savannah citizens: Chair- 
man, A. Pratt Adams; Vice-Chairman, Thomas Gamble; 
Henry Blun, H. L. Fulton, H. M. Garwes, II. F. Gibbons, 
H. V. Jenkins, H. L. Kayton, Mrs. Mills B. Lane, A. B. 
Lovett, Frank W. Spencer, O. B. Strong, Mrs. Lucy B. 
Trosdal, Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 General 
Assembly the size of the commission was reduced to eight 
including the Mayor and Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education as ex officio members. The day before 
the ordinance creating the college was passed, Mayor 
Gamble announced that the problem of housing the new 
school was solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz and her 
daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously pre- 
sented their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. 
Armstrong, their husband and father, respectively. Due to 
the many spacious rooms, remarkably few changes were 
necessary to fit the building for college purposes. The Arm- 
strong building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, is one 
of the most beautiful and expensive college buildings in 
the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded 
the Lucas Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in 



L2 A R M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

founding the Junior College. In his speech of acceptance 
Mr. Gamble announced that he had leceived the gift of a 
building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house classes in finance 
and commerce, the building to be named in honor of the 
donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings 
is the auditorium and recreation building erected and 
equipped by the city of Savannah and the federal govern- 
ment at a cost of $70, 000. All three buildings, standing 
side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park 
in the city, which consists of forty acres and is used by 
Armstrong students for recreational purposes. The Georgia 
Historical Society library, to which the students have access, 
faces the park and lies just across Whitaker street from 
the College buildings. 

In the Fall of 1937 the heirs of General and Mrs. 
Alexander R. Lawton gave the handsome Lawton Memorial 
auditorium to the City of Savannah for the use and benefit 
of Armstrong Junior College and of the people of Savan- 
nah. 

Under the will of the late Carrie Colding one-half of the 
sale price of the Colding residence on Jones Street was con- 
veyed to the College. 

The Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah 
and the adjacent community by giving to the young men 
and women who attend its classes an understanding of the 
world in which they live and an appreciation of the best 
that has been achieved by western civilization. Its graduates 
are equipped to continue their studies in the junior class 
of a senior college; but for those who do not desire to 
pursue their work elsewhere, terminal work is offered. The 
College attempts to provide its students with a keener reali- 
zation of the duties and responsibilities of citizenship and 
a broader conception of the world and its problems. 

A $100,000 science building to house Biology, Chemistry, 
Physics, and Home Economics will be constructed by the 
city and the federal government in 1941. 



o p s ,\ V \ \ \ A II . GE0RG1 \ 18 

Library 

The College library and reading rooms arc located in 
the Armstrong building. The furniture is walnut, finished 

to blend With the walnut paneled room. The capacity of the 

two reading rooms is adequate to seat one-fourth of the 
student body. 

In addition to the College library, the students have 
access to the Savannah Public Library and the Library of 
the Georgia Historical Society, which is one-half block from 
the Junior College. These libraries cooperate in supplying 
not only general reading matter but also books especially 
used in the courses of study. 

The aim of the library is to meet the demands of junior 
college students by providing material necessary to a more 
complete understanding of their studies and to stimulate 
their interest and enjoyment in recreational reading from 
the best of the older and modern writers. A course in the 
facilities and use of the library is required of all students. 
This provides a better understanding of books and a more 
intelligent use of the library. 

The library is under the care of a trained librarian and 
student assistants. It is open eleven hours each day of 
the week, with the exception of Sunday, when the library 
is closed. 

The College Book Store 

A book store is provided for the convenience of the 
students. Textbooks and classroom supplies are available 
at cost plus a minimum charge for handling. 

Gifts to the College 

No college was ever more fortunate in having good 
friends who have in so many instances satisfied needs of 
the institution through substantial gifts. This is truly a city 
college ; scores of Savannah citizens have contributed in 
some way to its establishment. 



11 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Mrs. B. F. Bullard, for many years a friend of education 
in this state, gave the College fifty volumes selected from 
her library and $200 with which to buy books and stage 
equipment. 

During the winter of 1935 Mr. Mills B. Lane, an out- 
standing Savannah citizen, purchased the home of Judge 
George T. Cann adjoining the College property, and pre- 
sented it to the Commission to be used to house classes in 
finance and commerce. This gift, with the exception of the 
gift of the original college building by Mrs. Lucy M. C. 
Moltz and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, is the 
largest that has thus far been made. 

An auditorium and class room building was built in 
1936 by the federal government and the city of Savannah 
at a cost of $70,000. It has been in use since September, 
1936. 

The handsome Lawton Memorial auditorium building 
on Bull Street was given to the City of Savannah for the 
use of the Armstrong Junior College and the people of 
Savannah by the heirs of General and Mrs. Alexander R. 
Lawton in the Fall of 1937. 

By bequest one-half of the sale price of the Colding 
residence on Jones Street was given the College in 1937. 
The Colding Fund now amounts to $1500. 

Two friends of the College, both desiring to remain 
anonymous, have made contributions valued at $2,000 each. 
One gift was for the purpose of making in the auditorium 
certain changes which will greatly increase the usefulness 
of the stage ; the second gift was several hundred very 
valuable and useful books. 

In acknowledging gifts, the College wishes to express 
appreciation of the many books and periodicals presented 
by Mr. Thomas Gamble. Mr. Gamble is a frequent visitor 
at the College and he seldom comes without bringing one 
or more carefully selected volumes for the library. 



OF S A \ \ \ \ A II . G E O R G 1 \ L6 

The city Is now constructing a $100,000 science build- 
ing. 

These gifts, and those of scores of other loyal friends 
whose names cannot be mentioned in the short space pro- 
vided in this bulletin, represent substantial contributions 
to the development of the College. The administration, 
faculty, and students wish to express their appreciation. 

Mr, Joseph Perelstine awards a scholarship to the out- 
standing first year commerce student. 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 

Since the establishment of the College, Savannah 
citizens and organizations have been extremely generous. 
in providing scholarship and loan funds for those students 
needing financial assistance. In addition to scholarships pro- 
vided locally, the National Youth Administration last year 
aided many students. This assistance has been extremely 
valuable to the College as it has been possible to use student 
talent in the several departments where help is needed. 

The Savannah section of the National Council of Jewish 
Women has established the Maria Minis Student Loan Fund, 
amounting to several hundred dollars, to lend to worthy 
and needy students desiring to attend Armstrong. Repre- 
sentatives of the College and the Council will administer the 
fund. 

Four scholarships of two hundred dollars each, to cover 
registration fees for two years, are awarded by the Junior 
College to the four high school graduates ranking highest on 
scholarship tests given at the College in April of each year. 
Applicants must be residents of Savannah. 

Students desiring aid may make application direct to the 
officers of the organizations listed below or to Professor 
Foreman M. Hawes, who is in charge of this work for the 
College. Application blanks may be obtained from Mr. 
Hawes. 



1 6 A RMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

The organizations and individuals who have provided 
student aid through the past six years are: 

National Youth Administration 
B. H. Levy Brother and Company 

Business cV; Professional Women's Club 
Savannah Section, National Council of Jewish 

Women 
Federation of Women's Clubs 
Pilot Club 
Pilot's Association 
Landrum Lodge 
Friedmans' Jewelers 
Woman's Club of Jewish Alliance 
Pan Hellenic Association 
Savannah Rotary Club 
Mrs. Joseph-Brooks Abrams 
Harmonie Club 

Requirements for Admission 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior 
College must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school with sixteen units of credit. 

2. A general average of all high school work amount- 
ing to five points above the passing grade, when 
figures are used, or one step above passing, when 
letters are used, will be required. 

3. The following specific requirements must also be 
met: 

A. Eight constants — 3 units in English, 2 units in 
social studies, 2 units in mathematics (1 must be 
in algebra and 1 should be in plane geometry), 
and 1 unit in science. 

B. Eight electives — 4 of these electives must be from 
the following subjects: English, social studies, 
mathematics, science, and foreign language. Four 
units may be from the vocational and avocational 
groups. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant 
should be made out on the proper forms by a competent 



OF s.\\ANNAH, GEORGIA 17 

official of the high school and mailed directly to the office 
of the Registrar. This certificate becomes the property of 
the Junior College and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

Fees and Refunds 

\'\'c* in Armstrong Junior College, including registration 
fee, will amount to a total of $l()r> for the year for residenl 
and non-resident students alike, payable $35 upon entrance 
in September, $35 at the beginning of the second quarter in 
January, and $35 at the beginning of the third quarter in 
March. The fees will include a subscription to the Inkwell, 
the College newspaper, and one copy of the College annual. 

Students taking science courses with laboratory work 
will be required to pay a small fee which is indicated in the 
description of the science courses found under "Courses of 
Instruction" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Fall - - $35.00 Registration fee 
Winter - $35.00 Registration fee 
Spring - $35.00 Registration fee 

$105.00 Total 
Laboratory fees additional. 

Special students will be admitted only by permission of 
the President. For less than three courses in any one quar- 
ter, the charge will be $15.00 for each course. 

A late registration fee of $5.00 will be charged any 
students who fail to register and pay tuition fees on the day 
designated for registration at the beginning of each quarter, 
unless excused because of sickness. 

In afternoon and evening classes a fee of $15.00 will be 
charged for one course, the maximum number of evening 
courses allowed for any one quarter. This rate applies to 
the courses taken within one quarter only. A course in- 
cludes three eighty-five minute lecture periods each week. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a 
quarter will receive a refund of one-half of the registration 
fee. No refunds will be made after the first thirty days of a 
term, and no refunds will be made to those dismissed from 
College, 



18 A R M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Enrollment Proa dure 

Registration of freshmen will be completed on Septem- 
ber IS. No student will be permitted to register unless a 
transcript showing all high school and college credits earned 
is in the hands of the Registrar. Considerable delay and 
perhaps expense may be avoided by attending to this mat- 
ter at least one month before college opens. 

Any freshman permitted to register after September 18 
will be charged a late registration fee of $5.00. Registra- 
tion includes the payment of fees to the Treasurer. 

All students will be required to make out a schedule 
for the year at the beginning of the fall quarter. Changes 
and additions will cost $1.00 each unless the student secures 
exemption from the President for providential reasons. 

All freshmen applicants must register in person and 
follow this procedure : 

1. Introduction of members of the faculty and ex- 
planation of courses at 9 A. M., September 18, in 
the College Auditorium. 

2. Registration, Armstrong Building, September 18. 
Be certain you have filled out application for ad- 
mission forms. Secure schedule. 

3. Payment of all fees in the Treasurer's office, Septem- 
ber 18. This may be done any time between the 
hours of 11:00 and 5:00. 

4. Friday-Saturday, September 19-20, will be devoted 
to preliminary tests, which will be required of all 
freshmen without any exceptions. Tests are 
scheduled to begin at 10:00 A. M. and 2:30 P. M. 

Registration and payment of fees of upperclassmen will 
be completed on September 19. Any upperclassman per- 
mitted to register or pay fees after that date will be charged 
a late registration fee of $5,00, 



o P S A V A N NAM, GEORGIA L9 

1\ sting and Guidana 

The College feels that it can render a most important 

service to the student by helping him find that vocation or 

profession where he can realize the most satisfaction ami 
success in life. With this in mind a committee of testing 
and guidance has been sot up through which the student 
may receive sound advice on his persona] and vocational 
problems. This committee studies the individual student and 
tries to discover his aptitudes and abilities. The information 
thus obtained is utilized by the entire faculty. 

Iu order that the College may have the necessary in- 
formation upon which to build a satisfactory guidance 
program, all students are required to take a series of tests 
before entrance requirements are fulfilled and registration 
completed. 

Student Load 

A normal load is 17 to 18 quarter hours each quarter. 
A student must pass 45 quarter hours of work before he 
will be ranked as a sophomore. 

Students who make the Dean's List any one quarter may 
carry an additional course or a maximum of 22 quarter 
hours for the subsequent quarter by payment of a fee of 
§5.00 . If for any reason a student not on the Dean's List is 
permitted to carry an extra load, an additional fee of $10.00 
will be charged. 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 

Permission of the Dean is necessary to drop a subject 
or to transfer from one subject or section to another. 

Explanation of Course Credit 

The school year lasts nine months and is divided into 
three quarters, Fall, Winter, and Spring. A course running 
five hours a week for one quarter carries 5 quarter hours, 
or 3-1/3 semester hours, credit. One quarter hour credit is 
allowed for each laboratory period. 



20 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Transfers from other Institutions 

No student will be accepted from another college with- 
out a transcript of college work from that institution, and 
no student may enroll in Armstrong Junior College who has 
been dropped from another institution or who is on pro- 
bation from another institution because of poor scholarship. 

A student transferring to Armstrong Junior College will 
have his credits reduced unless at least three-fourths of 
all grades received at another college are above the lowest 
passing grade of that college. If courses amounting to one- 
half a normal load are not passed with grades above the 
lowest passing grade, a transfer student will not be ac- 
cepted. 

Transfers to other Institutions 

No student will be recommended for transfer to other 
institutions unless three-fourths of all grades received at 
Armstrong are above D. 

Reports and Grades 

Reports of grades will be sent the student at the end 
cf each quarter. While the College feels that its dealings 
should be directly with the student, parents are urged to 
inform themselves as to the student's progress and to dis- 
cuss these reports with him. Student records in the Office 
of the Dean are, of course, always open to parents. 
Grade A plus, Exceptional 1 honor points per 

course 
Grade A, Superior 3 honor points per 

course 
Grade B, Better than average 2 honor points per 

course 
Grade C, Average 1 honor point per 

course 
Grade D, Barely passing honor points per 

course 
Grade E, Incomplete Minus 1 honor point 

per course 
Grade F, Failure Minus 1 honor point 

per course 



o V s A V A N N A II . GEORGIA 2] 

Grade E (Incomplete) — An incomplete may be removed 

by moans stipulated by the instructor of the course in which 

the student received the grade E. An E not removed in 
the succeeding quarter or at a designated time automatically 
becomes an F, 

An F can be removed only by repeating the course or 
passing a substitute course. Passing grades may not be im- 
proved by re-examination or by repeating- the course. 

Honor Points 

The number of honor points a student receives is deter- 
mined by the grades he makes, each grade carrying a 
certain number of honor points, as explained above. In 
order to graduate, a student must receive as many honor 
points, based upon the above grading system, as the num- 
ber of courses required for graduation, and as many honor 
points as courses taken by the student. 

Honors 

Students who maintain an aveage of B or above in eacn 
course during a quarter's work will be placed on the Dean's 
List of Distinguished Students. At the discretion of the 
Dean, special absence privileges may be granted to these 
students. 

Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction) will be 
bestowed upon those receiving an average of 3 honor points 
per course. 

A valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class 
from among the five students with the highest scholastic 
average in the work completed before the term in which 
the students graduate. 

All students who receive recognition on Honors Day 
will have their names recorded on a permanent Dean's List 
in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. 



22 A R MSTRONG JUNIOR C O L L E G E 

Pen Istine Award 

Mr. Joseph Perelstine, prominent Savannah business- 
man, makes an annual scholarship award to the first year 
student in Commerce who achieves the highest scholastic 
average. The award is made on Honors Day. 

Cooperation with the Examiner of the 
University System of Georgia 

The University System of Georgia has inaugurated in 
certain courses a uniform examination plan under the super- 
vision of a trained technician. A number of these courses 
are offered by Armstrong Junior College. With the per- 
mission of the Examiner and the administration of the 
University System of Georgia, Armstrong has been per- 
mitted to cooperate in this testing program. 

Final Examinations and Tests 

1. Regular written examinations are required in all 
courses at the end of each quarter. These examinations are 
held on the last three or four days of the quarter, in ac- 
cordance with a permanent schedule. 

2. Final examinations, except in laboratory practice, 
are limited to a period of three hours. In courses in which 
a considerable portion of the examination is of a practical 
nature, the instructor may extend the time at his discretion. 

3. Special examinations for students who have been 
officially excused from regular examinations may be held 
at suitable times fixed by the instructors concerned. Such 
examinations must be taken within the succeeding quarter, 
and a fee of $3.00 will be assessed for each examination. 

4. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each mid-term 
make-up test that is permitted. 

Attendance Regulations 

Students are allowed three absences per course to cover 
religious holidays, sickness, etc. Absences in excess of three 
must be satisfactorily explained to the instructor in charge 



F S A \ \ \ \ \ H . GEORGIA 

of the course if class work is to continue. Special faculty 
action will be required before a student may receive credit 

on a course from which he has been absent eight or more 
times, even though these absences are excused by the in- 
structor. 

Upon request, special absence privileges may be granted 

a student who is on the Dean's List, but the granting of such 
privileges is within the discretion of the Dean. 

A student who is absent from any class two days before 
or after a holiday or the beginning or ending of a term will 
be assessed $2.00 for each day or part of a day absent, even 
if an acceptable excuse is given. The assessment will be 
$3.00 a day in all other cases. 

Rules on Personal Conduct 

Students are requested to maintain high standards of 
personal conduct and character. Smoking in the auditorium 
is a violation of the city regulations. For purposes of safety 
and cleanliness, students are requested not to smoke in the 
buildings. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented in waiting to the Dean, 
is a prerequisite to honorable dismissal or re-entrance to this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should im- 
mediately make such intentions known to the Dean. 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 

All students failing (except in cases excused before 
examinations on account of sickness) to pass at least one 
course other than physical education in any one quarter 
will be dropped from the rolls of the College. All students 
who fail to make an average of at least four honor points 
(not more than one honor point will be counted in this 
reckoning for physical education) during the first three 
quarters' work at the Junior College will not be allowed 
to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students 
with less than a "C" average at the end of the fourth 



24 A li M STRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

quarter of college work, and at the end of the sixth quarter 
of college work a student must have an average of three- 
fourths an honor point per course in order to re-register. 

Number Required in Courses 

Unless at least fifteen students register for the course 
no course will be given without special action of the Dean. 

Student Activities 

Believing that self-discipline by the individual student 
has educational value, the faculty has endeavored to create 
an atmosphere of freedom around the College. The students 
have been free to form scholarly habits, to develop indi- 
vidual abilities and to practice self-restraint in a manner 
becoming adults. In keeping with this policy, which has 
been very successful so far, the faculty will place the same 
responsibilities upon and give the same freedom to in- 
coming freshmen. The faculty is unalterably opposed to 
hazing in any form. 

The President and faculty will provide regulations for 
student organizations. Any student group desiring to hold 
any public meeting or social event in the name of the 
College or in the name of the student organizations must 
notify the Committee on Student Activities two weeks in ad- 
vance of the meeting and find a place on the calendar kept 
in the President's office. 

Regulations Governing Social Organizations 

1. Any group of students desiring to organize a social 
club must submit to the Faculty Committee on Student Ac- 
tivities a petition for a charter. This petition should contain 
the following information : 

(1) Name of the proposed organization 

(2) Aims and purposes of the organization 

(3) Proposed regulations governing membership, 
initiation, and dues 



F S A \ \ N N AH. GEORGIA 26 

(l ) Plan of organization 

(.">) Proposed time and place of meeting 

((>) Name of proposed sponsor 

(7) Names of proposed members. 

2. No student may become a member of any social 

organization unless he or she has earned at least four lienor 
points at Armstrong in the quarter preceding initiation. A 
student who has not earned the required number of honor 
points, but who has an average of "C" on 17 quarter hours 
oi* academic work at mid-term, may, however, be pledged 
as a prospective member but may not enjoy full privileges 
of membership until after formal initation. 

3. Students may be pledged as prospective members 
of social organizations only after the mid-term reports of 
their first quarter at Armstrong, or the final grade report of 
the second and third quarters. 

4. All invitations to membership should be in writing. 
The invitation should be accepted or declined, in writing, 
within three days of the date upon which it is received. 
The reply to the invitation should be addressed to the 
Chairman of the Faculty Committee on Student Activities 
who will notify the organization and keep the replies on file. 

5. Any student organization desiring to give an enter- 
tainment shall notify the Chairman of the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Student Activities of such proposed entertainment 
at least two weeks in advance, stating, in writing, the nature 
of the entertainment, the time and place, and the chaperons 
to be invited. 

6. The sponsor of a social organization should not be 
a member of the faculty of the college. 

No social organization should be organized or continued 
unless it works toward very worthwhile objectives which 
will contribute to the progress of the College and the demo- 
cratic atmosphere of the institution. 



26 A R M S T R N G JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Li ctures and Cona rts 

Students of Armstrong are provided unusual opportuni- 
ties to hear some of the best lecturers in America as well as 
concert artists of ability. Through a special arrangement 
with the Savannah Community Forum, students of the 
College are permitted to attend six lectures during the fall 
and winter for the small fee of $1.00. These lectures are 
given in the college auditorium. 



The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship 

The Armstrong College Institute of Citizenship was or- 
ganized in January, 1939, as a college-community cooper- 
ative enterprise. The first institute was held on February 
2-3, 1939, and was open to the students and the public with- 
out charge. A number of out of town speakers appear on 
the programs. The object of the Institute is to promote 
better citizenship. 

A steering committee appointed by the President will 
select a student committee to promote the Institute. 

Aeronautics 

In cooperation with the Civil Aeronautics Authority of 
the United States, and the Strachan Skyways, Inc., the 
Junior College expects to offer courses in ground and flight 
instructions to a select number of students. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 
Student Senate 

MEMBERSHIP AND OFFICERS 
President of the Second Year Class (President of Sen- 
ate) ; President of the First Year Class (Secretary of Sen- 
ate) ; Vice President of the Second Year Class ; Editor of the 
INKWELL; Editor of the GEECHEE; One representative 
from each Club or Board recognized by the Senate ; Two 



OF S \ \ \ \ \ \ H . GEORGIA 

Freshmen Representatives to be elected by the class one 
week after election of class officers. 

PURPOSE 
To act as an official student agency for coordinating col- 
lege activities and for expressing student opinion. 

Leadership Society 

Eligibility for membership based on participation in 
student activities, student leadership, and general scholar- 
ship. 

A total of twenty (20) points comprising at least one 
major and at least two minor honors, distributed in at least 
three different fields, and a graduation average are neces- 
sary for eligibility for election. 

No one will be considered eligible for membership un- 
til after three quarters of work. Sophomores will be con- 
sidered eligible through their sixth quarter. Third year 
students may count activity points earned during any two 

years. 

A silver "A" will be awarded to each student elected to 
membership. For 1939-1940 and 1940-1941 these awards 
were made at the Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon, a part of 
the commencement program. 

Activity Point List 
To participate in extra-curricular activities a student 
must have a passing average in all academic courses. The 
following point system is used. 

Scholarship 

MAJOR HONORS 
10 "A" average, 3 quarters; 8 Permanent Dean's List; 
7 Dean's List 3 consecutive quarters; 6 "B" average 3 con- 
secutive quarters. 

MINOR HONORS 
3 "A" average one quarter (not included in major 
honor) ; 2 Dean's List average one quarter (not included in 
major honor) ; 3 winner of competitive scholarship. 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Athletics 

MAJOR HONORS 
10 two major letters (men: football and/or basketball; 
women : basketball and or tennis) ; 8 two letters (including 
one major and one minor, or recognized membership on 
team where no minor letter is given, or attainment of stan- 
dards set up by the coach) ; 8 captain major sport (includ- 
ing letter in this sport). 

MINOR HONORS 
5 Two minor letters (men : rifle, tennis, fencing ; women : 
rifle, swimming), or attainment of standards set up by the 
coach ; 4 One major letter; 4 Manager, major sport (includ- 
ing letter if given) ; 3 Captain, minor sport (including let- 
ter) ; 2 Minor letters or membership on team without letter; 
2 Cheer leader; 2 Manager, minor sport (including letter). 

General Leadership 

MAJOR HONORS 
10 President of Sophomore class; 7 President of Fresh- 
man class; 10 President of Theatre Board; 7 Outstanding 
Sophomore; 10 Valedictorian. 

MINOR HONORS 

5 Senate membership, if elected ; 4 other class officers 
(freshman, sophomore, and third year) ; President of recog- 
nized club (fraternities and sororities not included). 

Publications 

MAJOR HONORS 
10 Editor of INKWELL or GEECHEE; 8 Business man- 
ager of INKWELL or GEECHEE. 

MINOR HONORS 

6 Associate or Managing Editors (limited to five for 
each publication, to be chosen by editors) or Associate Busi- 
ness Manager; 4 Sports Editors (limited to two, to be chosen 
by editors) ; 3 Reporters, solicitors, and other staff members. 



o P S a V A \ \ A II . GEORGIA 

Theatre 

MAJOR HONORS 
C) Senior Member, Theatre Board. 

MINOR HONORS 
8 Junior Member, Theatre Board; 2 Crew work on one 
play (if not on junior or senior board in production class) ; 
2 Acting in one play. 

Miscellaneous 

MAJOR HONORS 
(> Membership in Home Economics Club five quarters 
with recommendation for this honor from President and 
Faculty Adviser of the Club. 

MINOR HONORS 
2 Membership in recognized club (fraternities and 
sororities not included) ; 3 Chairman Homecoming Com- 
mittee; 2 Member Homecoming Committee; 3 Chairman 
Citizenship Committee; 2 Member Citizenship Committee. 

Publications 
Armstrong's two student publications are the INK- 
WELL, monthly newspaper, and the GEECHEE, college an- 
nual. The cost of these publications is defrayed by student 
activity fees included in each quarter's tuition and by ad- 
vertising. They are distributed to all students. Students 
who register for only one or two quarters will make a small 
additional payment for their annual. 

Since especial training is required to publish success- 
fully the paper and the annual, students who wish to be 
eligible for Editor-in-Chief or Business Manager of either 
publication must do some apprentice work on the proper 
staff. A graduating average in all academic work is also re- 
quired. A student who has met the above requirements and 
who wishes to be a candidate for such an office should submit 
his name, with the name of the office for which he wishes to 
be a candidate, to the publications board, comprised of the 
editors and business managers of the two publications and 
the presidents of the freshman and sophomore classes. This 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

board will select nominees for each office. Nominations will 
be placed before the student body at the annual election of 
school officers in May. If no student receives a majority of 
votes, a runoff between the two students receiving the most 
VOteS is held. 

Homecoming Committ< < 

The homecoming committee is appointed by the Presi- 
dent of the College in consultation with class officers and 
faculty committee on student activities. 

Alpha Tan Beta Sorority 
Delta Chi Sorority 

Membership by invitation only. For rules and regu- 
lations, see page . Sororities and fraternities are not repre- 
sented on the Senate. 

Information concerning each of the following organi- 
zations may be obtained in room 207 of the Armstrong 
Building: 

The Savannah Playhouse 

Armstrong 4-H Club 

Council on Foreign Relations 

Armstrong Glee Club 

Armstrong Music Club 

Armstrong Monogram Club. 

Armstrong Home Economics Club 

Armstrong Flying Club 

Armstrong Job Club 

Tea Dances 

Tea Dances, an Armstrong tradition, have been an in- 
tegral part of student life since the inception of the College. 

Tea dancing takes place from 5 until 7 o'clock on Tues- 
day afternoons. Each dance will be sponsored by a club 
or other student group. A student committee will attend 
the dances, and will assign a rating to each dance. These 
ratings will be published each month in the Inkwell. 



o P SAVANNAH, GE0R61 \ 81 

Dances 

A few evening dances will be given throughout the 

school year, open to all Armstrong students and graduates. 
Admission to other persons will be i>y invitation only. 

The Savannah Playhouse 

The Savannah Playhouse of Armstrong Junior College 
was founded in 1936 for the purpose of emphasizing the 
study of speech and of serving the student body and com- 
munity in the field of the drama and its allied arts. The 
playhouse thus provides opportunity for one to enrich his 
background in the drama and to participate in stage pro- 
ductions. 

It is the aim of this theatre to produce from time to 
time various forms of the drama which are worthy of the 
experimental theatre. 

Student experience in the many phases of the work of 
the Playhouse not only constitutes foundation work for ad- 
vanced study in the field, but develops a confidence in one's 
ability to think and speak correctly. 

Holidays 

The College calendar provides for holidays only at 
Christmas, and in the spring. One additional holiday will 
be granted when the faculty attends the meeting of the 
Georgia Education Association. Although the school will 
not suspend classes for other occasions, students desiring 
to recognize religious holidays may do so, and a limited 
number of absences is allowed for such occasions. 

Adult Education 

The College will occasionally offer afternoon or evening 
classes for adults. The same number of hours will be spent 
in these classes as is spent in those on the regular schedule. 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Certificates Grantal 

The College will offer work leading to three different 
certificates: Associate in Liberal Arts, Associate in Homo 
Economics, and Associate in Finance and Commerce. Ap- 
plications for these certificates must be filed in the office 
of the Dean by April 1. 

General Requirements for Graduation 

1. A student will be accepted as a candidate for gradu- 
ation only after the completion of 16-2/3 courses with an 
average of 1 honor point per course. A course is 5 quarter 
hours credit. 

2. In order to graduate a candidate must have to his 
credit as many honor points as the number of courses re- 
quired for graduation and as many honor points as the 
number of courses completed. (For an explanation of honor 
points, see "Honor Points," page 21. "Course" credit is ex- 
plained on page 19.) 

3. Not more than ten courses (33-1 3 semester hours) 
will be accepted from another institution toward the com- 
pletion of work on a certificate, and all transfer students 
must remain in residence for nine consecutive months, re- 
gardless of the number of credits received elsewhere. The 
student must attend the Junior College during the last quar- 
ter when work is completed on a certificate, unless given 
special permisison to complete not more than two courses 
elsewhere by the President. 

4. A student transferring to Armstrong will have his 
credits reduced if more than one-fourth of all grades re- 
ceived at another college are the lowest passing grade in 
that college. 

Liberal Arts 
The Liberal Arts course is designed for those students 
who desire a broad educational background ; it is concerned 
with man and with the achievements of civilization. The 



o F S A V A \ \ A ll , G B O R G 1 A 

COUrse deals with man's natural, social, and cultural history 

and seeks to give the student an understanding of the past 

and its relationship to the present. 

When he has completed the course, the student is ex- 
pected to have some knowledge of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of natural science, of the great movements which 
have directed the course of civilization, and of the artistic 
and literary masterpieces of the world. The student is then 
ready to specialize in any field he chooses — natural or 
social science, literature, art, or commerce. If, however, the 
student does not expect to continue his education further 
in college, he is ready to go into his life's work better able 
to understand and to see in their proper relationships the 
problems of life and of society, and to appreciate more fully 
man's achievements and aspirations. 

By a proper selection of electives, liberal arts students 
may prepare themselves for the technical and professional 
courses in senior colleges. Correspondence with the senior 
college concerned should be undertaken by the student in 
planning such a course of study. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Liberal Arts 

Quarter hours 

Social Science . . 2-3 10 

Biology .... 11-12 10 

Humanities . . . 1-2 10 

English .... 11-12-13 .... 12 

Foreign Language" 10 

Mathematics 6 

Political Science . . 12-13-14 .... 10 

Library Science . . 1 2 

Total specified 70 

Electives 30 

Total for graduation 100 

* Students who have had two high school units in French or Spanish 
must schedule French 3 or Spanish 3. Those students offering- three 
units must schedule more advanced courses. 



34 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Home Economics 

In view of the fact that an appreciation of the problems 
of home making is desirable for all young women whether 
they continue work at a senior college or not, the Home 
Economics course at Armstrong Junior College is designed 
to help the greatest number, and, at the same time, satisfy 
the requirements of the senior college for those who wish 
to major in home economics. The work beyond the general 
core courses will be taken in the field of home economics 
and closely related subjects. 

The entrance requirements to the home economics 
course are the same as for the liberal arts and commerce 
courses. 

With the exception of Dietetics and the course in meal 
planning and table service, home economics courses have 
been planned without prerequisite. The four courses select- 
ed in home economics are those that will give a broad train- 
ing, fit the girls for home making, and give them a richer 
life. 

The home economics clothing laboratory is splendidly 
equipped. The foods laboratory has five home kitchens and 
an attractive serving-unit. 



Course Requirements for Graduation 
Home Economics 

Quarter hours 



Art 11 

(or Sociology 61) 
Biology . . 
Chemistry 
English . . 
Home Economics 
Humanities 
Mathematics 
Political Science 
Social Science 
Sociology 
Library Science 



11-12 . , 

1-2 . . . 
11-12-13 

1, 2, 3 and 5 

1-2 . . . 

1 . . . 
12-13-14 

2-3 . . . 

60 . . . 

1 . . . 



5 

10 

10 

12 

20 

10 

6 

10 

10 

5 

2 



Total specified 100 

Total t'ov graduation 100 



O F S A V A N N A II . G E R G I A 

Financi and Comma rce 

The Junior College offers a course leading to an As- 
sociate in Finance and Commerce diploma. The entrance 
requirements are the same as for other courses offered in 
Armstrong Junior College. 

The course of study that has been devised is expected 
to aid the student in understanding himself and society, 
to give him some knowledge of the way the world of finance, 
industry, and trade operates, and to provide some train- 
ing in the techniques of business. 

The course of study outlined below has been constructed 
to meet the needs of those who will participate in the life of 
the business community. Only those students who w T ish to 
complete their work at the Junior College are advised to 
take this course. If any student desires a four-year course 
in finance and commerce, he should pursue liberal arts at the 
Junior College, with electives in economics and accounting. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
Finance and Commerce 

First Year Quarter hours 

Commerce ... 14 5 

Social Science . . 2-3 10 

Human Biology . 11-12* 10 

Economics ...21 5 

English .... 11-12-13 .... 12 

Mathematics ... 1 6 

Library Science .1 2 

Total ~~50 

Second Year 
Commerce . . . 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10 . . . 30 

Humanities ... 1-2 10 

Social Science . . 12-13-14 

(or Commerce 41-42) 10 

Total 50 

* Human Biology may be postponed if Commerce 41-42 is taken the 
first year. 



86 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

English 

1. Introduction to Poetry 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course deals with the history of English poetry, a 
study of the various types and forms, and a reading and 
understanding of representative works from the leading 
English and American poets. 

5. Play Production 

5 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory work a week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

This course includes a fundamental study of production 
methods with emphasis upon the technical aspects of pro- 
ducing plays in the modern theatre, such as: the physical 
theatre, brief history of the physical development of the 
theatre, stage craft, construction of settings, stage lighting, 
stage costuming, and stage make-up. Each member of the 
production class will be required to work on a minimum 
of one crew during the term. 

6. Play Production 

5 hours lecture a week for one quarter. 

Play directing and acting, devoted both to the historical 
and the contemporary theatre. 

7. Public Speaking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A fundamental course designed to develop the public 
speaker. Emphasis is placed upon platform delivery and 
elements governing effective speaking in audience relation- 
ship. 

11-12-13. Freshman English 

1 hours a week for three quarters. 

The course has a two-fold objective: to teach the stu- 
dent to grasp the ideas of others through learning to read 
intelligently, and to teach him to express his own ideas 



OF S A V A N N A ll . G E O R G 1 A 87 

logically and forcefully In speech and In writing. Particu- 
lar emphasis is placed on acquiring a complete and usable 
vocabulary. Formal grammar, punctuation, and spelling are 
applied in the papers and reports prepared by the students. 

Several novels and biographies arc used as collateral 
reading. A considerable part of the course will he devoted 
to oral English. (English 11-12 prior to 1941-42 was of- 
fered 5 hours a week for two quarters.) 

Humanities 
1-2. Humanities 

5 hours lecture a week for two quarters. Re- 
quired of all students planning to attend the Uni- 
versity System. 

A survey of the cultural achievements of Western Civili- 
zation. The course seeks to give the student a general under- 
standing of the leading intellectual and esthetic movements 
of Western Europe and an acquaintance with the greatest 
literary figures from Homer to Galsworthy. 

Art 

11. Art Principles and Design 

2 lectures and 8 hours laboratory work a week 
for one quarter. Fee $2.50. 

A study of fundamental principles underlying all art. 
Laboratory work in the use of line, mass, and color. Intro- 
duction to color theory and lettering. 

French 
1-2. Elementary French (Not offered 1941-42.) 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 
Grammar, oral and written practice, early reading of 
easy exercises in French. In the second quarter the read- 
ing objective will be emphasized along with continued prac- 
tice in pronunciation and composition. 

No credit will be allowed until French 2 is completed. 
3. Intermediate French 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



38 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Grammar review, oral and written drill, reading of 
selected texts. 

7. Introduction to Literature 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A survey course with particular emphasis on the nine- 
teenth century. Written and oral reports on collateral read- 
ings. 

8. French Classical Drama 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine will be 
studied. Reports on collateral readings. 

9. French Short Stories. (Not offered 1941-42) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Spanish 

1-2. Elementary Spanish 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

This course will be offered only if there is sufficient de- 
mand. 

The elements of grammar, composition and conversation 
are studied with a view to early reading. In the second 
quarter, along with continued stress on oral and written 
drill, especial emphasis will be given to reading. 

3. Intermediate Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Grammar review, oral and written drill, reading and 
translation. 

5. Commercial Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of Spanish-American business methods with ex- 
tensive practice in the writing of business letters in Spanish. 

6. Modern Prose Readings 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



OF S \ A \ INN AH , GEORGIA 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

AND MATHEMATICS 

Biological Scu na 8 

Invertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

A study of invertebrate animals including local fresh 
water and marine forms. 

4. General Vertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 
11-12) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

An intensive study of the vertebrate group including 
laboratory dissection of several types. The study will in- 
clude the kinds of vertebrates and their distribution in time 
and space, vertebrate embryology, and details of the 
various vertebrate organ systems. 

11-12. Human Biology 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Materials fee 
$1.00. (No refund.) 

This course is designed to give the student an under- 
standing of general biological principles, particularly as 
applied to the human organism. The first half of the course 
includes a study of fundamental facts of biology, human 
anatomy, and physiology. The second half of the course 
includes studies in problems of public health, reproduction, 
and the principles of genetics, evolution, and eugenics. 

Physical Sciences 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry (Prerequisite: high 
school chemistry) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit 
$2.50. (12 quarter hours credit.) 



40 ARMSTRONG J UN I O R COLLEGE 

The first course is a study of the preparation, properties, 
and uses of a number of the non-metallic elements and their 
compounds. The fundamental laws of elementary inorganic 
chemistry are stressed. 

The second course is a continuation of Chemistry 1, and 
includes the preparation, properties, and uses of the more 
common metallic elements and their compounds. The 
laboratory work will otter several experiments which will 
serve as an introduction to qualitative and quantitative 
analysis. 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 1-2) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Deposit $2.50. 

The text used is by Louis J. Curtman. The lectures will 
deal with the theoretical aspects of the subject with special 
reference to the application of the law of mass action. The 
laboratory work will consist of a study of the reactions, 
precipitations, and detections of the principal metals and 
acid radicals. 

13-14. Elementary General Chemistry 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. De- 
posit $2.50. (12 quarter hours credit.) 

The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry are 
studied with considerable descriptive matter for illustrative 
purposes. 

21-22. General Physics (Not offered 1941-42 unless 
science building is completed) 

4 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory work per 
week for two quarters. Laboratory fee (2.50. 
Deposit $2.50. 

This course is a study of the properties of matter, 
mechanics of solids, mechanics of fluids and heat, sound, 
light, and electricity. 

11-12. Physical Science (Not offered 1941-42) 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 
Materials fee $1.00. (No refund) 



o F S A \ \ \ \ A ll . 6E0RG1 A 41 

This course is a survey of the physical sciences. The 
Bubject matter is taken from the fields of physics, chemistry, 
astronomy, geology, and geography. In general, the ob- 
jectives of the course are to make one more familiar with 
the physical phenomena of our environment ; to develop an 
appreciation of the scientific method; and to furnish a cul- 
tural and general informational background which may be 
USed as a foundation for future work by those students 
whose interests may lie in the field of the physical sciences. 

Mathematics 

1. A Survey of Mathematics 

2 or 3 hours a week for three quarters (6 quarter 
hours credit) 

(This course was offered 5 hours a week for one 
quarter in 1940-1941, and will be offered as a 5 hour 
course in the spring quarter.) 

The purpose of this course is to show how from mathe- 
matical ideas, are built broad logical theories which have 
wide application in the sciences and philosophy; and to 
show that the development of mathematics from ancient to 
modern times has been an important factor in civilization. 
Students who have difficulty with this course may be re- 
quired to attend class three hours a week. 

2-3-4. College Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic 
Geometry 
5 hours a w r eek for three quarters. 

Course 2 is a study of quadratics; ratio, proportion, and 
variation; the binomial theorem; complex numbers; theory 
of equations; determinants; logarithms and the slide-rule; 
and permutations, combinations, and probability. Course 3 
is a study of plane and spherical trigonometry and analytics 
through the circle. Course 4 completes the study of the 
plane and solid analytics. 

5. Differential Calculus 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



42 ARMSTRONG JIXIOR COLLEGE 

This course includes derivatives of algebraic and trans- 
cendental functions; maxima and minima; rates, velocity, 
and acceleration ; the definite integral, and its application to 
areas, and volumes of revolution; and series. 

6. Integral Calculus 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course is a continuation of Mathematics 5. It in- 
cludes methods of integration ; single and multiple integrals ; 
partial and total differentials with physical and geometrical 
applications. 

7. Mathematics of Finance (Not offered 1941-42) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course includes simple and compound interest; 
annuities; amortization and sinking funds; bond valuation; 
and life insurance. 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

History 

2-3. Western Civilization 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

A survey of Western culture with emphasis on the his- 
torical development of major social institutions. Consider- 
able time is devoted to a study of background material use- 
ful in making an approach to the understanding of world 
trends today. 

4. Contemporary Georgia 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The economic, social, and political problems of Georgia 
are studied with particular emphasis on regional and nation- 
al problems which impinge, either directly or indirectly, on 
our state. Human and natural resources, the conditions of 
agriculture and industry, and problems of state and local 
governments are surveyed. 
6. Latin America 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the land and the people. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 18 

Political Science 
12-13-14, National and state Government of the 

United States 

.")'._. hours a week for 3 quarters (l<> quarter 

hours credit.) 

Principal emphasis is placed upon principles, processes, 

and problems, with attention given to recent political de- 
velopments. Course 1 1 deals with state government and 
the problems associated with state government. (Political 
Science 1- prior to 1941-42 was offered five hours a week 
for one quarter.) 

Economics 

21. Introductory Economics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A course which introduces the student to economic con- 
cepts and principles with due attention to modern economic 
institutions and problems. 

Psychology 

31. Introductory Psychology 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

An introduction to the scientific study of mental life. 

Sociology 

60. The Family 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of factors which have made for permanency in 
family life ; changing social and economic conditions which 
affect family members in their relations with each other 
and the community ; survivals of various characteristics 
affecting family life and consideration of their worth ; con- 
servation of the family and education for family life. 

61. Elementary Child Study 

3 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory a week for 
one quarter (5 quarter hours credit.) 



11 A R M S T BONG J U N I O R COLLEGE 

DIVISION OF FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

2-3. Accounting 

3 hours lectures and 1 hours laboratory a week 
for two quarters. 

Principles of single proprietorship, partnership, and 
corporation accounting; the balance sheet, profit and loss 
statements, and the theory of debits and credits. In course 
3 intermediate accounting will be covered. 

4. Accounting Problems 

3 lectures and 4 hours laboratory a week. 

5. Marketing 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A general critical survey of the field of marketing and 
consumer demand in relation to the marketing machinery. 
Functions, methods, policies, marketing costs, and the 
problems of the farmer, manufacturer, wholesaler, com- 
mission merchant, broker, retailer, and other middlemen. 
Emphasis on principles, trends, and policies in relation to 
marketing efficiency. 

7. Money and Banking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the principles, functions, and forms of money 
and credit; analysis of money and credit problems; theory 
of money and banking; and banking practices. 

10. Insurance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



A study of life, fire, health, and accident insurance; 
employer's liability, title and credit insurance ; and insur- 
ance and bonding companies. 

11-12. Business Law (Not offered 1941-42) 
5 hours a week for two quarters. 

A brief study of law from the business man's standpoint 
dealing with such subjects as contracts, wills, sales, negoti- 
able instruments. Attention is given to the historic and 
economic development of certain principles of commercial 



OF SAVANNAH, (i K O R 6 1 A 

usage. Where Georgia statutes and practices arc at variance 

with those of other states, the Georgia rules are emphasized. 
ll. Elements of statistics (Prerequisite Mathematics 
l or 7) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

The collection, classification, and presentation of numer- 
ical data. 

31-32. Field Work 

Fifteen hours per week for two quarters 
Credit, 10 quarter hours. 

This course has served as a means of bridging the gap 
that exists between the School of Finance and Commerce 
and the actual business world. All finance and commerce 
students, interested in registering for this course, make 
application at the beginning of the school year. Arrange- 
ment is made for those applicants acceptable by the in- 
structor to work as internes in Savannah business organi- 
zations. Students make confidential monthly reports, along 
with other assigned projects, to the instructor, while at the 
same time confidential monthly reports are being made on 
the work of the internes by his or her employer. Although 
this is a field in which Armstrong is pioneering, the program 
has been very successful in the past. This success has been 
primarily due to the cooperation of Savannah business men 
and their interest in a high type of personnel. 

41. a, b, c, Typewriting 

5 hours a week for three quarters. Credit, 6 quarter 
hours. 

Laboratory fee, $10.00. No refund will be made to 
students permitted to drop this course. 
A student may drop this course after completing 41 a 
and 41b and receive 4 quarter hours credit. 

42. a, b, c, Gregg Shorthand 

5 hours a week for three quarters. Credit, 6 quar- 
ter hours. 
A student may drop this course after completing 42a 
and 42 b and receive 4 quarter hours credit. A student must 
be taking, or must have had Commerce 41 a, b, c to qualify 
for this course. 



46 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Clothing 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. 

This course is designed to establish appreciations, inter- 
ests, habits, and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, 
design, construction, and care of clothing. Problems are 
provided so that students gain actual experience in ap- 
plication of these fundamental principles. The clothing 
budget is studied as an aid in obtaining the greatest satis- 
faction from the money spent for clothing. 

2. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A study of food emphasizing its selection and prepara- 
tion, applying fundamental scientific principles. A unit in 
marketing will present actual problems of consumer, ob- 
servation of marketing conditions, factors affecting price, 
grades, brands of food, and training for more intelligent 
buying. The unit in common foods and their preparation 
acts as a basis for further meal preparation. 

3. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

A continuation of foods including different types of 
dishes used for specific purposes, food selection, meal 
planning, and table service. Students gain actual experience 
in all forms of family entertaining such as family meals, 
buffets, teas and receptions. 

5. Home Planning and Furnishing 

4 lectures, 2 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. 

A study of planning and furnishing the home from the 
standpoint of family needs; modern tendencies in housing j 
and application of principles of art to home furnishing; a 1 
short history of architecture; location of house; study of 
floor plans, exteriors, grounds, furnishings of various rooms 
emphasizing heating and lighting and treatment of walls, 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 47 

floors, windows, together with selection and arrangement 

of furnishings. A short study of house care and manage- 
ment will bo made. 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
LIBRARY SCIENCE AND AERONAUTICS 

1. Freshman Physical Education (Not offered L941-42) 
3 hours a week throughout the year. 

One course, special lectures, (lames and various group 
activities to meet individual needs indicated by medical and 
physical examination and previous physical education. 
Follow-up physical examinations, conferences, and health 
lectures. 

2. Sophomore Physical Education (Not offered 1941- 
1942) 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 
One course, special lectures. Continuation of Physical 
Education 1. A wider choice of activities is permitted. 

3. Dancing 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 
An appreciation of the dance as an art. Corrective 
exercises for posture and balance. 

4. Advanced Dancing 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 

Intermediate ballet combinations, character dancing, 
brief study of the modern technique of dancing. 

The dancing classes are conducted by Ebba Oleson 
Thomson, who was formerly a pupil of Margit Tarassof, 
Michael Fokine, Albertina Rasch and Raymond Bott. 

Library Science 

1. 2 hours a week for one quarter. 2 hours credit. 

A short course in the facilities and use of the library is 
required of all freshmen. Instruction in bibliography making 
and note taking are included in this course. 

Aeronautics 

21. Ground Instruction 

6 hours a week for one quarter. 

22. Flight Instruction 

3 hours a week for one quarter. 



•IN 



A R M S T K N G .J U NI O R COLLEGE 



STUDENTS ENROLLED YEAR 1!) 10-1911 



Total Number Advanced Students 

Total Number First Year Students 

Grand Total 



lol 

•i it; 
317 



GRADUATES, 1939-40 

ASSOCIATE IN FINANCE AND COMMERCE 



Bainbridge, Betty 

DeLoach, Robert Osgood, Jr 
Gardner, John Calhoun 



Glass, William Anthony, Jr 
Irby, Sara Eleanor 

Tyre, MacDonell 



ASSOCIATE IN LIBERAL ARTS 



Adams, Robert Walker, Jr. 
Alexander, Ruth Brown 
Anderson, Frances Louise 
Atanda, Frances Imogene 
Arden, Florence Virginia 
Arnau, Maudine 
Baggs, Robert Edwin 
Bailey, Samuel Harkness 
Baker, Elinor Strobhar 
Ball, Carolyn 
Barton, Norman Hope 
Bennett, Leonard Lee 
Bland, Lillie Mae 
Boyd, Eleanor Webster 
Byington, Betsy 
Byrd, Jane Winter 
Christiansen, Ruth Gilmer 
Clinton, Ann Victor 
Cole, Nancy Lovett 
Cone, William Henry 
Cronemiller, George Retiben 
Crosby, Jayne Elizabeth 
Crumbley, Elizabeth Morgan 
Davis, Arthur Ferdinand 
Davis, Ann Hasseltine 
Davis, Robert Emmett 
Driggers, Mae 
Edel, Helen Riette 
Elmore, David Rice 
Farrell, Margaret 
Fawcett, Dorothy 
Fennell, Anita 
Fordham, Leon 
Freeman, Kate Helen 
Gardner, Sam 
Gooch, Pauline 
Gordon, Robert Leon 
Hesse, Jean Wilhelmina 
Holbrook, Mary E. 
Howard, May duBignon 



Ihley, Richard Sidney 
Lang, Aaron 

Langston, Alex Thomas, Jr. 
Laughlin, Joseph Heath, Jr. 
Lee, Warren Wright 
Lennox, Edwin S. 
Longwater, Leon 
McCauley, John C. 
McFarland, Beverly 
McPeters, Mary Olivia 
Maner, Frank Vincent 
Murray, Ernestine 
Myers, Elizabeth Krenson 
Newton, James Byron 
Odrezin, David 
Perdomo, Malta Aurora 
Perfect, Evelyn Darrow 
Powell, Eugene Carleton 
Price, Thomas M., Jr. 
Rabb, Mary Caroline 
Reagan, William Francis 
Rice, Marion Jennings 
Riedel, Augustus I. 
Robertson, Siegvart Joseph 
Rolison, Estelle Mary 
Rubin, Florence 
Sadler, Barney L. 
Scott, Alice Jane 
Seawright, Eunice Lucille 
Smith, Margaret 
Stoughton, Owen Francis 
Street, Sarah Frances 
Tilson, Geraldine 
Vannerson, Frances Rabun 
Whittle, Joseph Ambrose 
Wilkerson, Emogene Sarah 
Wilson, Claude 
Wolfe, John Saxton, Jr. 
Wortsman, Elise Ann 



S A V ANN \ II 



GEORGIA 



19 



ASSOCIATE l\ HOME ECONOMICS 



Bumann, Caroline Helen 
Cory, Ellen Margaret 
Hadsell, Louise 
Harms. Marie Madeline 
James, Prances Eugenia 

King, Prances Louise 



McCrecry, Elizabeth Ann 
Meisner, Agnes Elizabeth 

Towers, Mai-io Elizabeth 

RanitZ. Catherine 

Schweizer, Prances ( Jarol 
Solatia, Elizabeth 

Wright, .lane 



STUDENTS ATTENDING ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 

COLLEGE 1940-1941 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 



A 

Adams, Thomas 
Alexander, Louis 
Allred, Sophia 
Altick, Regina 
Anchors, Billie 
Athanas, Nicholas 

B 

Barbee, Ann Rose 
Barnes, Rose 
Beaty, Clisto 
Bennett, Edward 
Bercegeay, Eddie 
Berg 1 , Joseph 
Bernstein, Debs 
Bernstein, Morris 
Blake, Robert 
Brackin, James 
Bradley, Milton 
Bruce, Frances 
Brumitt, Ruel 
B run son, Howell 
Bulcken, Jane 
Bumgardner, Fred 

C 

Carlock, George 
Casey, Helen 
Catherwood, Samuel 
Collins, Betty 
Collins, David 
Conway, Alfred 
Coolidge, Walter 
Corbi, Frank 
Cordes, Watson 
Crider, Fretwell 
Crosby, Oscar 
Cutten, Fred 
Davis, John 



D 

de Court, Francis 
Deffenbaugh, Ruth 
Deffner, Theodore 
DeHaven, Clarke 
DeLoach, Jean 
Dinerman, Jack 
Dismukes, Rosanne 
Ditzel, Edison 
Dodd, Lucy 
Dooley, Margaret 
Dowiing, Lee Roy 
Durden, Katherinc 



Edwards, Lucretia 
Eisenman, Annette 
Elliott, Josephine 
Ernst, Andrew- 
Eubanks, Harry 



Ferrelle, Harvey, Jr, 
Feuger, Agnes 
Floyd, Manlv G. 
Foy, Jack H. 
Fripp, Ruby 
Fulghum, Winifred 

G 

Garrick, Carolyn 
Gerrity, Thomas P. 
Gilchrist, Jean 
Girardeau, Helen 
Goldberg, Joseph 
Gordon, Harvey 
Grace, Noble J. 
Griner, Eugene 
Groover, Charles 
Grossman, Murray 
Guerard, Lucille 
Guilfoil, John 



50 



A K M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



FIRST \K.\\l STUDENTS— (Continued) 



11 

Hagan, Robert 
Hanson, Barbara 
Harms, Anne 

Harms, Kathleen 

1 [arrison, Elizabeth 
Hart, Dorrk 
Heckman, Orville 
Helmken, Gilbert 
Henderson, Lindsey 
Hendricks, Kathryn 
Union, ( lharles 
Heyman, Lillian 
Hill, Alma 
Hill, Ethel 
Hinely, Annette 
Hitt, Roy 
Holt, Bertha 
Hood, Mary Ann 
Horn, Robert 
Hudson, Aubie 
Huff, Jo Beth 
Hughes, Howard 
Hymes, Milton 
Hyrne, Pamela 



Jackson, Richard 
Javetz, Edward 
Jaworek, Selma 
Jones, Ethel 
Jones, Rachel 
Jordan, Jean 
Jordan, William 

K 

Kaplan, Shirley 
Kaufmann, Harry 
Keniston, Henry 
Kenney, John 
Kiblor, Helen 
Klein, Dorothy 
Kohn, T. L. 
Kolgaklis, Theodore 
Kravitch, Bernice 



Laird, Allan 
Langley, Alphan 
Laughlin, Homer 
Lee, Elizabeth 
LeVan, Von E. 
Levin, Irving 
Lightsey, Fred 
Lockler, Donald 



M 
McCaskill, Oliver 

McFarland, Marjorie 
McKillip8, James 
McLeod, Margaret 
McNamara, Ja 

McTeer, Frank 
Manson, Madalyne 
Marshall, Samuel 
Martin, Anne 
May, Emil 
May hew, Frances 
Mendel, Felix 
Miller, Hugh 
Miller, Robert 
Minis, Carol 
Mixon, Cameron 
Mizell, Harley 
Montague, Augusta 
Morgan, Elizabeth 
Morrell, {Catherine 
Mosely, Jeanette 
Mouzon, Annie Laurie 
Myers, Shirley 

X 

New, Ollireid 
Newton, Audrey 
Newton, Dorothy 
Nichols, Nancy 
Norwood, LaVern 



O'Connor, Jane 
Oesterreicher, James 
Ogletree, Elizabeth 
Orvin, Murray 
Osborne, Henry 

P 

Parr, Billy 
Penney, William 
Pitts, 'Harvard 
Porter, Robert 
Purdum, Margaret 
Rabeler, Betty Jane 



Rabey, Edgar 

Rabourn, Joseph 
Ranitz, John 
Rennick, Ethel 
Rhodes, Jack 
Pizza, Frank 
Robertson, Alberta 
Ronan, Paul 
Ross, Thomas 
Rood, Noel 



S A \ A \ N A II 



GEORGIA 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS (Continued) 



Savage, Robert 
Scarborough, Annie Laurie 
Schur, Ruth 

Seigler, Annie Laurie 
Sharp. William 

Shearouse, William 
Sheppard, Henry 
Shipley, William 
Shoob, Julius 
Sklansky, [rving 
Smith. Carlyle 
Smith Carolyn 
Smithberg, Maurice 
Snipes, Ralph 
Storer, Julia 
Street, Betty 
Sullivan, John 
Summerell, William 
Sylvia, Theodore 

T 

Temple, Chris J. 
Tilson, Martin 
Timberlake, Franklyn 
Tucker, Margaret 
Tuten, Terrell 



Usher. Charles 



Viser, Robert 

W 
Von Waldner, Mary 

Wade. Austin 

Wall. Joseph 

Warner. Marguerite 

Warshaw, Ruth 

Watson, Pat 
Webster, Rebecca 
West, Maud 
Wheeler, Mary 
Williams, Bobbie 
Williams, Carolyn 
Williams, Martha 
Williams, Robert 
Willis, Elaine 
Wills, Benjamin 
Wilson, Robert 
Wise, Doris 
Wolfe, Eugenia 
Wolfe, Henrietta 
Wynn, Georgia 

Y 

Young, Edward 
Z 

Zerman, Alice 
Zipperer, James 



Jo 



ADVANCED STUDENTS 



Addy, Bernard 
Altstaetter, Antonia 

B 

Babanats, Ernest 
Baker, Kenneth 
Barnett, David 
Barton, Norman 
Beckett, Julie 
Behnken, William 
Bentley, Doris 
Bentley, James 
Bidez, Miriam 
Blair, Emil 
Blanton, Nell 
Bowyer, Lucy 
Bragg, Vernon 
Braithwaite, Richard 
Bryan, Linda 
Buntyn, Marjorie 
Burton, Frances 



Cargill, Ruth 
Christian, Joseph, Jr, 
Clemens, Emma 
Cohen, A. J., Jr. 
Coyle, William 
Craig, Joseph 
Crawford, Robert 

D 

Davenport, James 



Feagin, Gladys 
Feuger, Mary 
Finch, Dorothy 
Finch, Robert 
Flythe, Thomas 
Futral, Herschel 



52 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



ADVANCED STUDENTS— (Continued) 






(i. none, Joseph 
Gibson, Louise 
Graham, Leonella 

Griffin, Sarah 

11 

Halm, Maltha 
Haile, Margaret 
Hamilton, Rose Ann 
Hamlet, Alice Louise 
Hart, Gordon 
Hester, Robert 
Hinely, Mary 
Hoffman, Frank 
Eiollis, Virginia 



Jachens, Richard 
Jaudon, Jack 
Jenkins, Joseph 

K 

Kicklighter, Clyde 



Langston, Alex 
Lasky, Annette 
LeBey, Sterly 
Livingston, Joseph 
Lowe, Walter 

M 

Mclntire, Frank 
McMillan, Betty 
Marshall, Julia Ann 
Mendes, Joseph 
Middle-ton, David 
Monsalvatge, Raymond 
Moore, Catherine 
Mosley, Marjorie 
Mulligan, Bernard 



Owens, Sara 



Parker, Eloise 
Patterson, Jeanne 
Peveler, Richard 
Pierce, Marcelle 
Pike, Henry 
Powell, Carleton 



Quattlebaum, Lillian 

R 

Ralston, Adaline 
Reed, James 
Reiser, Frederick 
Rentz, W. H. 
Reynolds, Margaret 
Reynolds, Perry 
Robertson, Siegvart 
Robinson, Con 

S 

Schley, Helen 
Schwanebeck, Alfred 
Schweizer, Elsa 
Shepherd, Edwin 
Sikes, Sam 
Simon, Charles 
Smith, Constancia 
Stults, Barbara 



Taylor, Mary 
Thompson, Lynette 
Turner, Cleve 
Tyson, Jack 



Vandivere, Mary 
Victor, Irving 

W 

Wallace, James 
Waters, Joseph 
Weatherly, Earl 
Weil, Marx 
Wheaton, Ann 
White, Margaret 
Williams, Jack 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



1942-1913 

SUMMER — FALL — WINTER — SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong Junior College 

A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 

"The country can no longer afford to have young men 
proceed with their education at a moderate tempo." 

— Secretary of the Navy 




:6d)30 



MEMBERSHIP IN 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



Volume VII [5] Number 1 



AR ty# TRONG COLLEGE 



(ARMSTRONG IS COOPERATING with 
THE ARMY AND NAVY 

I N VESTIG ATE 



V-l 



IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN BECOMING AN 
ENSIGN IN THE 



cNAVY 
= * = 



INQUIRE ABOUT 
ENLISTED RESERVE PROGRAM 

OF THE 

a4RMY 

AND A LIEUTENANT'S COMMISSION 



PREPARE YOURSELF 

FOR COMMISSIONS IN THE 

NATION'S FORCES 



See Pages 8-12 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 




Y 




THOMAS GAMBLE HALL 




HERSCHEL V. JENKINS HALL 



CALENDAR 1942 



iM:: 



Summer QuCLVti / 



Registration first term 
freshman tests .... 
Dedication of Gamble and Jenk 
Classes begin .... 
Examinations first term 
Registration second term 
Examination second lerm 



Saturday A Monday, June IS & i"< 
Monday-Tuesday, June 15-16 



Hall. 



Fall Quarter 



M 



Faculty meeting, 4 :00 I 

Freshman assembly in 

Auditorium, 9:00 A. M 
Freshman registration 
Freshman preliminary test: 
Upperclassman registratioi 
All Classes begin 
Test .... 

Faculty meeting- 
Armistice Day address 
Test .... 

Thanksgiving holidays 
Examinations 
Homecoming- 
Christmas holidays 



.1 une i 5 

Tuesday, June L6 

Wednesday, July 22 

Thursday, July 23 

Saturday, August 29 



Wednesday, September 'J.:\ 



Thursday, September 24 

Thursday, September 24 

Friday-Saturday, September 25-2(5 

Friday, September 25 

Monday, September 28 

Friday, October 23 

Friday, October 30 

. Wednesday, November 11 

. Wednesday, November 25 

Thursday-Saturday, November 2G-28 

Wednesday-Friday, December 16-18 

Monday, December 21 

December 19-January 2 



Winter Quarter 



Registration . 
All classes begin . 
Test . . . . 

Faculty meeting . 
Institute of Citizenship 
Test . 

Examinations 
Winter quarter closes 



Spring Quarter 



Monday, January 4 

Tuesday, January 5 

Friday, January 29 

Wednesday, February 3 

Thursday-Friday, February 4-5 

Friday, February 26 

Monday-Thursday, March 15-18 

Thursday, March 18 



Registration 

All classes begin .... 
Georgia Educational Association 
Meeting — classes suspended 
Test 



Monday, 
Tuesday, 



March 22 
March 23 



To be announced 
Friday, April 16 

Faculty meeting Wednesday, April 21 

Examinations Monday-Thursday, May 31-June 3 

Faculty meeting Friday, June 4 

President's reception Friday, June 4 

Sophomore-Alumni luncheon Saturday, June 5 

Graduation exercises Monday, June 7 



For further information write R. W. HOLLAND, Registrar 



A R M STRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

R EG] ST RATI X 

Registration will be conducted on June 13 and 15 from 
9 to 1 and ."» to 5. For other registration dales see the 
calendar. 

In room 105 Jenkins Hall on June 15 at 12:00 and 3:30, 
and June 16 at 8 :20 placement tests will bo given all enter- 
ing students. 

All students will register on the first floor of the Arm- 
strong Building. The first room on the right as you enter 
the building is the place where you secure your schedule. 
Saturday, June 13 instructors will be on hand to assist 
students with schedules. 

The schedule will be carried across the hall to room 1 
where it will be copied. This copy will be carried to room 
2 where fees will be paid to the treasurer. Students will 
select one of the following courses: 

Section 1. Liberal Arts — First two years of A.B. 

and B.S. and other degrees. 
Section 2. Liberal Arts — Premedical or scientific. 
Section 3. Liberal Arts — Pretechnical. 
Section 4. Finance and Commerce. 
Section 5. Home Economics. 

Schedules for sections 1, 2, and 3 must be approved by 
Mr. Askew, section 4 by Mr. Strahl and section 5 by Miss 
Bain. 

All courses are somewhat similar but 2 and 3 will permit 
more mathematics and laboratory science courses to be 
taken during the freshman year. 

War Time Speed-up Program 

The war has made it necessary for practically everybody 
to work hard and continuously. Individuals who are 
physically and mentally in good condition will not be able 
to justify three months of idleness during the summer while 
the country is at war. All of us should do something this 
summer to produce needed goods and services for the nation 






<» P S A V A N N A H , G E O R G 1 \ 

or better prepare ourselves i'<>r future service bo our country 
and community. The war effort can be aided tremendously 
by you if you will train yourself t<» do some specialized or 
semi-specialized task. A good college education is a pre- 
requisite to most specialized jobs. 

To assist Freshmen and Sophomores a schedule of 
courses covering the summer, fall, winter, and spring terms 
is enclosed and requirements on the various associate de- 
grees are enumerated. Some changes have been made in the 
requirements since last year. 

Students are urged to work out tentative programs 
covering a six quarter period which will include all require- 
ments and electives. This program may be adjusted at the 
beginning of any quarter. Students may enter at the begin- 
ning of any quarter. 

Under the speed-up program students will be completing 
work at the Junior College in August, December, March, 
and June; but only one commencement will be held each 
year, the latter part of May or early June. 

Pre- Aviation Cadet Program and Enlisted Reserve Program 

In order to assist students who wish to pursue college 
work in preparation for examinations which will lead to 
cadet appointments in the Army and Navy Air Corps, 
ensigns commissions for deck or engineering duty in the 
Navy, and officers' candidates schools in the Marine Corps, 
a program of study has been worked out at Armstrong 
following suggestions of the Army and Navy. The first two 
years of this course are outlined for your assistance, the 
last two years must be taken at some accredited senior 
college. 

Both the Army and the Navy are anxious to secure 
qualified aviation cadets at the end of two years of college 
training. Many will be deferred to complete degree require- 
ments, and the Army and Navy announcements can be 
secured by calling at the President's office, Armstrong 
Junior College. The Marine Corps will enlist qualified 
college students as first class privates in the Marine Corps 



10 A R |fl S T R o N G J l N I R C OLLEG i: 

Reserve for future training in the Candidates Class for Com- 
mission. They will be placed in an inactive status until 
called for training. 

It is important for students who are physically qualified 
to secure a good foundation in English, mathematics through 
trigonometry, physics or chemistry, and history. The pro- 
gram below is only suggestive and may be altered if the 
necessary requirements are taken. Students still in high 
school should take geometry ; advanced algebra and trig- 
onometry will help, in preparation for the college program. 

Screen tests will be given by the services to the students 
before they become aviation cadets. About 80 ( 'c of Army 
cadets are commissioned; 67$ as flyers. 80,000 students 
each year will be enrolled in the Navy's V-l program. 
About 20,000 will be chosen by examination to fly at the 
end of two years of college work, 15,000 will continue their 
college work toward a degree, and the remainder will go 
into the Navy as ordinary seamen; but about 7596 of the 
latter group will become petty officers with an opportunity 
to again work for a commission after one year. 

If circumstances make it necessary, the deferred status 
of the student may be terminated at any time. A student 
who can maintain a "c" average or slightly better in all 
subjects at Armstrong should have no great difficulty with 
the mental tests. 

Changes in the program will be subject to suggestions 
by the Army and the Navy at any time. 

A recent Army announcement states : 

"The Army Air Force Enlisted Reserve Plan is a part of 
an over-all Army Enlisted Reserve Corps program shortly 
to be announced. This program will provide opportunities 
for college men to enlist in other branches of the Army on 
a deferred basis and to continue their education through 
graduation if a satisfactory standard of work is maintained. 
In case of necessity the Secretary of War shall determine 
when they shall be called to active duty. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA i i 

"it is understood thai men so enlisted will have the 
opportunity o( competing for vacancies in officers' candidate 

schools. 

"This plan has been approved in the belief that con- 
tinuance o\' education will develop capacities for leader- 
ship." 

Upon completion of the Army and Navy enlisted reserve 
program as outlined below, students will be graduated as 
Associates In Liberal Arts. 

Enlisted Reservi Program 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology), Chemistry 1-2 (In- 
organic) or Physics 21-22 (General), English 11-12 (Fresh- 
man), English 23-24 (Literature), Economics 21 (Introduc- 
tion), History 2-3 (Europe and United States Since 1870), 
Mathematics 2 (Algebra) and 3 (Trigonometry and 
Analytics), or 2 and 8 (Spherical Trigonometry), Library 
Science 1, Political Science 11-12 (American Government), 
Foreign Language 10 quarter hours, Physical Education 1-2, 
and Electives 5 quarter hours. 

If a student plans to take the Army board examination 
before completing two years of college, the following sub- 
jects are recommended: 

Chemistry 1-2 or Physics 21-22 

English 11-12 

History 2-3 

Library Science 1 

Mathematics 2 and 3 or 2 and 8 

A joint release of the Army and Navy signed by Frank 
Knox, Secretary of the Navy has this very emphatic state- 
ment : "The country can no longer afford to have young 
men proceed with their education at a moderate tempo. 
Extra curriculum activities not specifically directed toward 
physical or mental preparation for participation in the war 
effort can no longer be encouraged. In war times recreation 
in college life must be limited to that necessary for a 
healthy and well-rounded existence. In other words, the 
colleges in war time must be places of intensive effort and 



L2 A R M S T R N G .J U N I H C L L E G E 

accomplishment. For those colleges which arc prepared to 
proceed with education along these lines, and for those 
young men who are prepared to enter or remain in college 
with these purposes and who have the qualities of mind and 
character to carry them out, the Army and Navy urge the 
continuance of college education." 

Rt qvin mi nts for Admission 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior 
College must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school with sixteen units of credit. 

2. A general average of all high school work amount- 
ing to five points above the passing grade, when 
figures are used, or one step above passing, when 
letters are used, will be required. 

3. The following specific requirements must also be 
met: 

A. Eight constants — 3 units in English, 2 units in 
social studies, 2 units in mathematics (1 must be 
in algebra and 1 should be in plane geometry), 
and 1 unit in science. 

B. Eight electives — 4 of these electives must be from 
the following subjects. English, social studies, 
mathematics, science, and foreign language. Four 
units may be from the vocational and avocational 
groups. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant 

should be made out on the proper forms by a competent 
official of the high school and mailed directly to the office 
of the Registrar. This certificate becomes the property of 
the Junior College and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

Fees and Refunds 

Fees will be charged according to the student load in 
quarter hours. A normal load is lti to 17 quarter hours 
each term or quarter. 

5 quarter hours - - $15.00 

10 quarter hours - - 25.00 

15-17 quarter hours - - 35,QQ 






OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA IS 

A student who maintains a dean's list average will be 
permitted to take - () quarter hours a term \'<>v (40.00. If 

for any reaSOIl other Students are permitted to take 20 

quarter hours of work the charge will he (45.00. 

students taking laboratory work will he required to pay 

a small fee which is indicated in the description of the 
courses found under "Courses of Instruction" elsewhere it! 
this bulletin. 

A late registration fee of $2.()() will be charged any 
students who fail to register and pay fees on the day 
designated for registration at the beginning of each quarter, 
unless excused because of sickness. 

Anyone withdrawing- during the first thirty days of a 
quarter will receive a refund of one-half of the registration 
fee. No refunds will be made after the first thirty days of a 
term, and no refunds will be made to those dismissed from 
College. 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 

Permission of the Dean is necessary to drop a subject 
or to transfer from one subject or section to another. 

Explanation of Course Credit 

A course running five hours a week for one quarter 
carries 5 quarter hours, or 3-1/3 semester hours, credit. 
One quarter hour credit is allowed for each laboratory 
period. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented in writing to the Dean, 
is a prerequisite to honorable dismissal or re-entrance to this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should im- 
mediately make such intentions known to the Dean. 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 

All students failing (except in cases excused before 
examinations on account of sickness) to pass at least one 
course other than physical education in any one quarter 
will be dropped from the rolls of the College. All students 



1 A A R M S T R N G J U N IOR COLL E G E 

who fail to make an average of at least four honor points 
(not more than one honor point will be counted in this 
reckoning for physical education) during the first three 
quarters' work at the Junior College will not be allowed 
to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students 
with less than a "C" average at the end of the fourth 
quarter of college work, and at the end of the sixth quarter 
of college work a student must have an average of throe- 
fourths an honor point per course in order to re-register. 

Number Required in Courses 

Unless at least fifteen students register for the course 
no course will be given without special action of the Dean. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
A student must maintain an average of "C" to graduate. 

Quarter 
LIBERAL ARTS Hours 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology) 10 

Economics 21 (Introductory) 5 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 (Literature) 10 

Foreign Language 10 

History 2 (Europe Since 1870) 5 

History 3 (United States Since 1870) 5 

Mathematics 1 (Introductory) 

or 2 (College Algebra) 5 

Ten hours from following: 

Political Science 12 

Political Science 13 

Economics 22 

Sociology 60 

Laboratory Sciences 

Foreign Language 10 

Library Science 1 (Use of the Library) .... 2 

Physical Education 1-2 :: 8 

Electives 20 

Total 100 



OF SAVANNAH, 6EORG1 A 16 

Quarter 

[OME ECONOMICS Hour 

tiology l l-i- ( Human Biology) 10 

Jhemistry L-2 (Inorganic) 10 

Snglish l L-12 (Freshman) L0 

toglish 23-2 1 (Literature) 10 

Twenty-five hours from following: 

Art 11 

Chemistry 5 (Organic) 

Home Economics 1 (Clothing) 

Home Economics 2-3 (Foods) 

Home Economics 5 (Home Furnishing) 

Home Economics 6 (Nutrition) 2T) 

History 2 (Europe Since 1870) 5 

History 3 (United States Since 1870) 5 

Library Science 1 (Use of the Library) .... 2 

Mathematics 1 5 

Sociology 60 5 

Physical Education 1-2 ::: 8 

Electives 5 



Total 100 



An academic course of five quarter hours may be substituted for 
physical education by students who are working in the afternoons. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



L6 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Quarter 

I'lXANCK AND COMMERCE Hours 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology) 10 

Twenty-five hours from following: 

Commerce 2, 3, 1 (Accounting); 

7 (Money and Banking) 

10 (Insurance); M (Statistics) 25 

Economics 21 (Introductory) and 

22 (World Resources) 10 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 (Literature) 10 

History 2-3 (Europe and U. S. Since 1870 ... 10 

Library Science 1 (Use of the Library) .... 2 
Mathematics 1 (Introductory) 

or 2 (College Algebra) 5 

Physical Education l-2 :;: 8 

Electives 10 

Total 100 



An academic course of five quarter hours may be substituted for 
physical education by students who are working in the afternoons. 



o P SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 17 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
DIVISION OF HUM A NIT] ES 

English 
5. Play Production 

.") hours lecture, 1 hours laboratory work a week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

This course includes a fundamental study of production 
methods with emphasis upon trie technical aspects of pro- 
ducing plays in the modern theatre. 

(). Play Production 

5 hours lecture a week for one quarter. 

Play directing- and acting, devoted both to the historical 
and the contemporary theatre. 

7. Public Speaking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

11-12. Freshman English 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

(This course was number 11-12-13 and carried credit of 
12 quarter hours in 1941-42. The revised course is 10 
quarter hours.) 

23. Early English Literature 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

24. Recent English Literature 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

25. Masters of American Literature 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Art 

11. Art Principles and Design 

2 lectures and 8 hours laboratory work a week 
for one quarter. Fee $2.50. 

A study of fundamental principles underlying all art. 
Laboratory work in the use of line, mass, and color. Intro- 
duction to color theory and lettering. 



18 A R M S T RON G .7 1' X I O R c L L E G E 

Fn itch 

1-2. Elementary French 

."> hours a week for two quarters. 

7. Introduction to Literature 

5 hours a \\ eek for one quarter. 

8. French Classical Drama 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

9. French Short Stories 

") hours a week for one quarter. 

10. Contemporary Literature 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Spanish 

1-2. Elementary Spanish 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 

3. Intermediate Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

5. Commercial Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

6. Modern Prose Readings 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



I S \ V \ N \ \ II . G E o R c i \ in 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
AM) MATHEMATICS 

Biological Set* nces 

Invertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 
:\ hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

4. Genera] Vertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology) 

11-12) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

11-12. Human Biology 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Materials fee 
$1.00. (No refund.) 

This course is designed to give the student an under- 
standing of general biological principles, particularly as 
applied to the human organism. 

Physical Sciences 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. Break- 
age deposit $2.50. (12 quarter hours credit.) 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 1-2) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for 
one quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage de- 
posit $3.00. 

4. Inorganic Quantitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 1-2) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage 
deposit $3.00. 



2o A RMSTRONG JUNMOR COLLEGE 

5. Elements of Organic Chemistry (Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 1-2) 

: > ) hours lecture and (> hours laboratory per week 
for one quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage 
deposit $3.00. 

13-14. Elementary General Chemistry (Not offered 
1942-43) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week 
for two quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. De- 
posit $2.50. (12 quarter hours credit.) 

The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry are 
studied with considerable descriptive matter for illustrative 
purposes. 

21-22. General Physics 

4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory work per 
week for two quarters. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

Deposit $2.50. 

Mathematics 

1. A Survey of Mathematics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A beginning course in algebra, statistics, finance and 
trigonometry. 

2. College Algebra 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

3. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry through the 
circle 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

4. Analytic Geometry 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

8. Mathematics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Spherical Trigonometry and Mathematics of Aviation. 



1 SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 21 

DIVISION OF social SCIENCES 

History 

2. Europe Since 1870 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

3. United States since 1870 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

6. Latin America 

5 hours a work for one quarter. 

A study of the land and the people. 

Political Scii na 

12. National Government of the United States 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

13. State and Local Government 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

(Political Science 12-13 was offered as 12-13-14 in 
1941-42.) 

Economics 

21. Introductory Economics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

22. World Resources 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Psychology 

31. Introductory Psychology 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Sociology 

60. The Family 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



22 A R M S T RONG JUNIOR COLL E G E 

DIVISION OF FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

2-3. Introductory Accounting 

3 hours lectures and 1 hours laboratory a week 
for two quarters. 

1. Accounting Problems 

3 lectures and 1 hours laboratory a week. 

5. Marketing (Not offered 1942-43) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

7. Money and Banking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

10. Insurance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

14. Elements of Statistics (Prerequisite Mathematics 1 ) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

31-32. Field Work 

15 hours per week for two quarters 
Credit, 10 quarter hours. 

This course has served as a means of bridging the gap 
that exists between the School of Finance and Commerce 
and the actual business world. All finance and commerce 
students, interested in registering for this course, make 
application at the beginning of the school year. Arrange- 
ment is made for those applicants acceptable by the in- 
structor to work as internes in Savannah business organi- 
zations. Students make confidential monthly reports, along : 
with other assigned projects, to the instructor, while at the 
same time confidential monthly reports are being made on 
the work of the internes by his or her employer. Although 
this is a field in which Armstrong is pioneering, the program 
has been very successful in the past. This success has been j 
primarily due to the cooperation of Savannah business mei 
and their interest in a high type of personnel. 
51, Typewriting 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 2 quarter 

hours. 

Laboratory fee, $3.50. No refund will be made to 

students permitted to drop this course. 






OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

52. Advanced Typewriting 

5 hours a week for one Quarter. Credit, 2 quarter 
hours. Laboratory fee $3.50. 

53. Advanced Typewriting 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 2 quarter 
hours. Laboratory Too $3.50. 

61. Gregg Shorthand 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Credit, ■) quarter 
hours. 

(i2. Advance Gregg Shorthand 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 3 quarter 

hours. 

63. Advance Gregg Shorthand 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 3 quarter 
hours. 



DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Clothing 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. 

2. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

3. Advanced Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

5. Home Planning and Furnishing 

4 lectures, 2 hours laboratory each week for one 
quarter. 

A study of planning and furnishing the home. 

6. Nutrition 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



24 A R M S T R X (J J U XIOR COLLEGE 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
LIBRARY SCIENCE AND AERONAUTICS 

1. Freshman Physical Education 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 

2. Sophomore Physical Education 

.*') hours a week throughout the year. 

3. Dancing 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 

1. Advanced Dancing 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 

Library Science 

1. 2 hours a week for one quarter. 2 hours credit. 

A short course in the facilities and use of the library is 
required of all freshmen. Instruction in bibliography 
making and note taking are included in this course. 

Aeronautics 

21. Ground Instruction 

6 hours a week for one quarter. 






AVANNAH, 6E0RG1 A 



26 



STUDENTS ENROLLED L941-42 

Total .... 276 

GRADUATES, 1941 



ASSOCIATE IN LIBERAL ARTS 



Babanats, Ernest 
Baker, Kenneth 
Barnett, Davit! 
Bentley, Doris 
Bidez, Miriam 
Blair, Emil 
Blanton, Lillie Nell 
Braithwaite, Richard 
Buntyn, Marjory 

Christian, Joseph 
Clemens, Emma 
Coyle, William 
Craig, Joseph 

Davenport, James 

Feagin, Gladys 

Finch, Dorothy 
Futral, Herschel 

Genone, Joseph 
Graham, Leonelln 

Griffin, Sarah 

Hahn, Martha 
Hamilton, Rose Ann 
Hester, John Robert 
Hinely, Mary 
Hoffman, Frank 

Jenkins, Joseph 



Kicklighter, Clyde 

Lasky, Annette 
Leb< y, Sterly 
Livingston, Joseph 
Lowe, Walter 

McMillan, Betty 
Marshall, Julia Ann 
Mendes, Joseph 
Miduleton, David 
Monsalvatge, Raymond 

Owens, Sara 

Peveler, Richard 

Quattlebaum, Lillian 

Ralston, Adaline 
Reynolds, Perry 

Schwanebeck, Alfred 
Schweizer, Elsa 
Simon, Charles 
Smith, Constancia 

Taylor, Mary 
Turner, Cleve 
Tyson, Jack 

Victor, Irving 

Wallace, James 
Waters, Joseph 



ASSOCIATE IN FINANCE AND COMMERCE 



Mosley, Marjorie Alleen 
Powell, Carleton 



Robertson, Siegvart 
Williams, Jack 



ASSOCIATE IN HOME ECONOMICS 



Bowyer, Lucy 
Burton, Frances 
Cargill, Ruth 



Parker, Eloise 
Patterson, Jeanne 
Pierce, Marcelle 



20 



A RMSTROXG JUNIOR COLL E G E 



STUDENTS ATTENDING ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 
COLLEGE L941-42 



Adams, Thomas 
Addy, Bernard 
Aimar, Thomas 

Alexander, Louise 
Alexander, A. L. 
Anchors, Billie Ruth 
Anestos, Harry 

B 

Ballinger, L. M. 

Barbee, Ann Rose 
Barry, Ellen 
Behnken, William E. 
Belsinger, Esther 
Bennett, Dorothy 
Bennett, Edward 
Bercegeay, Edward 
Bernstein, Debs 
Beytagh, William Joseph 
Bleakley, Edward, Jr. 
Boblasky, Dorothy 
Bono, Murray 
Boyd, Gretchen 
Bradley, Milton 
Brewer, Jewel Estel 
Brown, Richard 
Brown, Winifred 
Bryan, Linda 
Butler, Julia 



Calhoun, L. M. 
Cantey, Thelma H. 
Charlton, Catharine 
Cohen, A. J., Jr. 
Coleman, Sheftall B., Jr 
Collins, Betty 
Collins, James 
Collins, Perry 
Cone, Thomas 
Coolidge, Walter 
Cooper, Jack 
Cooper, Marvin Harris 
Cornell, Virginia 
Cottingham, Ida 
Crider, Fretwell 
Crosbv, Oscar 
Culver, Elizabeth M. 



D 

Davis, Barbara 
Davis, Bryan, Jr. 
Davis, Martha 



D 

Davis, Rosetta 
DeLoach, Jean 
DeWitt, Ada 

Dillon, Robert Wayne 
Dixon, L. Bleckley 
Dodd, Lucy 

Dooley, Father Brendan 
Dooley, Margaret 
Dooley, Thomas Joseph 
Douglas, Allen 
Douglas, Hazel 
Drew, Henry Jackson 
DuBois, John Harmon 
Duhse, R. J. 
Duke, Daniel F. 
Dukes, Jean 
Durden, Katharine 
Durham, Alexis 



Edel, Virginia 
Edwards, Lucretia 
Elliott, Josephine 
Elliott, Mary Lou 
Ernst, Andrew 



Ferguson, Eleanor 
Feuger, Agnes 
Finch, Dorothy 
FitzSimons, Theodore 
Flythe, Thomas 
Ford, Mary 
Fulghum, Winifred 



Gaines, Ezekiel 
Gannam, Michael 
Gilkey, Mary Lucille 
Gnann, John Wyatt 
Goodove, Sophie S. 
Goette, Mary B. 
Gordon, Harvey 
Graham, Paul 
Graham, William 
Gray, Donald M. 
Greenberg, Selma 
Griffin, Herbert 
Griner, Eugene 
Grossman, Murray 
Guerard, Lucille 






S \ \ \ \ \ A H , G E R G I A 



27 



H 

Haile, Margaret 
amilton, Barbara 

an.-cii, Howard Hi 

ardwick. Kathryn 
ardy, Richard 
arms, Anne 
anus, Kathleen 
eckman, Orville 

Helmken, Gilbert 

Helmly, Willetta 

Heyman, Mac 

Hill, Ethel 

Hinely, Ernest 

Hodge, 1). B. 

Holt, Bertha 

Hood, Hary Ann 

Horn, Robert 

Huff, Jo Beth 

Huff, Miriam 

Hunt, Joseph 

ll\ rne, Pamela 



Ingram, Corinne 



Jackson, Richard 
Javetz, Edward 
Jaworek, Selma 
Jewett, Howard 
Johnson, Patricia 
Johnston, Martha Sue 
Jones, Rachel 
Jordan, Nell 
Jordan, William 

K 

Kahn, Lorraine 
Kibler, Helen 
Kicklighter, Edward C. 
Kicklighter, Gloria 
Kieffer, Marjorie 
Kirkland, Anne 
Kitchens, Darriel 
Klingon, Arthur 
Kolgaklis, A. Theodore 
Kolman, Esther 



M 

McDermott, Margaret !•:. 
McDonough, Larrj \ 
McFarland, Marjorie 
McGinn, Thomas J. 
McMahon, Mary 
MacLeod, Margaret 
Mallory, Petty 
Manson, Madalyne 
Marshall, Caroline 
Mayhew, Prances 
May hew, Louise 
Meisner, H. Gordon 
Mikcll, C. B. 
Miller, Helen 
Minis, Carol 
Montague, Augusta 
Moore, Thomas F., Jr. 
Morgan, Bettye 
Morrell, Katherine 
Mosley, Jeanette 
Murphy, Margaret 
Murrin, James E. 
Muse, Robert 
Musselwhite, Ercel Mae 

N 

Nealon, Helen Jean 
New, Ollireid 
Newton, Audrey 
Newton, Dorothy 
Nichols, Nancy 
Norris, Celeste 

O 

O'Brien, Noreen 
O'Connor, Jane 
Odrezin, Gilbert 
Oppenheimer, Mary 



Parr, William 
Patterson, Dan 
Pearson, Marie 
Perkins, Wesleigh 
Pitts, Harvard 
Purdum, Margaret 



Lain, Kathryn 
Laird, Allen 
Lasky, Aneta 
Lasky, Miriam 
Laughlin, Homer 
Leaptrott, Jane 
Levington, Helen 
Lewis, Robert 
Littlejohn, Annie Laurie 
Livingston, Joseph 



Rabb, Roy 
Rabey, D. Wilkie 
Ranitz, John 
Redmond, Robert 
Reed, Samuel 
Reiser, John Walton 
Reitzel, Carl, Jr. 
Rentz, W. H. 
Rhodes, Jack 
Rice, George A., Jr. 



28 



A I: M S T R O N G .JUNIOR COLLEGE 



R 

Ricks, Willman 
Roberts, Delphina 
Robertson, Alberta 
Ro siter, Jule C. 

S 

Sadler, Barm 

Saul, Semon 

Saunders, .Jean 

Saussy, Robert 

Schur, Ruth 

Seabrook, Mary 

Segall, Regina 

Seigler, Annie Laurie 

Sharpe, William 

Shoob, Marvin 

Sieg-el, Melvin 

Sklansky, Irving 

Smith, Alvie 

Smith, Carlyle 

Smith, Carolyn 

Smith, Carolyn P. 

Smith, Elsie Wayne 

Smith, Rosa J. 

Stafford, Lois 

Steinheimer, Lawrence, Jr 

Stephenson, Bobbie 

Storer, Julia 

Street, Betty 

Suddath, Mary Ann 

Sullivan, John 

Sullivan, Sara 

Summerell, William 



Thorpe, Kathleen 
Traub, Barbara 

Tinner, Maiy 



U her, Charles; 

W 

Wade, Austin 
Wakeman, Mary Anne 

Walton, Grace E. 
Warner, Marguerite 
Watson, Patten 
Watters, Elizabeth 
Weatherly, Earl 

ster, Rebecca 
Weeks, Harry, Jr. 
Weiser, Rosalyn 
Weitz, Elizabeth 
Wells, A. Glover 
West, Maud 
Wheeler, Mary 
White, Margaret M. R. 
Whittle, Paul 
Williams, Carolyn 
Williams, Martha 
Wills, Benjamin 
Wilson, Mary Margaret 
Wolfe, Kenneth, Jr. 
Wolfe, Henrietta 
Worsnop, Robert 



Tatum, Sue 
Taylor, Lorena 
Tharin, Suzanne 
Thigpen, Fred 



Yager, Harriet 



Zerman, Alice 



STUDENT NURSES 



Brewer, Martha 
Brinson, Mary 

Butler, Zehra 
DeLoache, Geraldine 
Edwards, Charlotte 
Fordham, Catherine 
Fordham, Juanita 
Harrell, Jeanette 
Hunt, Florence 
Lanier, Rubye 



Lanier, Ruth 
Long:, Sadie 
Oliver, Belle 
Rig-gs, Dorothy 
Smith, Brunelie 
Stansell, Eugenia 
Strickland. Miriam 
Thranhardt, Grace 
Winge, Clara 



SCHEDUL E 



SUMMER 
FIRST TERM 
I -j Periods: 

I 11 

>h 3 

1 

2 

Ecoiuuiiiis .... 6 

I 5 Periods: 

jmatits 2 

I 2 

h 10 

By 60 

*h 1 

lerce 

I 6 Periods: 

I 23 

rmalics 8 

leicc 61 

Kica 22 



I to 1<L' 

ged for 

list i y 5 — 

tranie 

fledical Tech- 

ris and Home 

omists only 

■D TERM 
d 4 Periods: 

eh 12 

ish 2 

list ry 2 

nerce 3 

Bogy 31 

d 5 Periods: 

lematies 3 

iry 3 

ch 9 

tnerce 52 

ie Economics .... 5 

»d 6 Periods: 

lish _. 24 

irerce 62 



) U.l 



WINTER 



1st 



Period 

English, i l or 12 English i l or 12 

Human Biology 11 Human BiologJ 12 

Commerce 2 Commerce 3 

Home Economics 5 Sociology 60 

Chemistry 4 



2nd Period 

Commerce -"'3 Commerce 

Economics 21 Human Biology ... 

History 2 English 11 

Sociology 60 Political Science . 



3rd Period 



Spanish 

Mathematics 

Home Economics 
Library Science ... 
English 



Frern h 

Spanish 

Mathematics 
Home Economi 
Economics 



4th Period 

French 7 

Library Science 1 

Mathematics 2 

Commerce 61 

Commerce 7 

History 3 



French 8 

Mathematics 8 

History 3 

Commerce 62 

English 23 

Commerce 10 



5th 


Period 






Chemisti 


y 
Sc 




1 
1 
1 


Chemistry 






Spanish 


Library 


ience 


English 


English 






6 


Biolo.cy 


English 






.. 25 




Spanish 






1 




Biolo.uy 






.. 4 





6th Period 
Commerce 51 



Commerce 52 

Physics 21 



SPRING 



History 

Economics _' I 

Ait 11 

Chemistry 2 

Commerce 

Human Biology 12 

Envrlish 11 or 12 

Political Science 13 

French 2 

Spanish 6 

Mathematics 4 

Home Economics 3 

Human Biology 1 1 

Commerce 4 

French 9 

Mathematics 1 

Commerce 63 

English 24 

English 12 

History 6 

Chemistry 3 

English 7 

Commerce 14 

English 25 



Commerce 53 

Physics 22 






•.'«••• 






L 






'943-'944 



SUMMER — FALL — WINTER — SPRING 






BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 



A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




^ MEMBERSHIP IN 

^- 1 American Association of Junior Colleges 

"1 A Q*P M Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

135 
7 



Association of Georsia Colleges 



Volume VIII 



Number 1 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



ik 



"Education is a companion which no 
misfortune can depress — no crime destroy — 
no enemy alienate — no despotism enslave. 
At home, a friend; abroad, an introduction; 
in solitude, a solace; and in society, an 
ornament." 



ti * 




ARMSTRONG COLLtG 

18337 IIRRARY 




THOMAS GAMBLE HALT. 




COLLEGE COMMISSION 




OUTriT AXDI XG SOPHOMOH ES 



8 A R M s T BONG JUNIOR C L LEG E 

CALENDAR 1943— 1944 

Summer Quarter 

Registration first term Saturday & Monday, June 12 & 14 

Freshman teste Monday-Tuesday, June 14-15 

Classes begin Tuesday, June 15 

Examinations first term Wednesday, July 21 

Registration second term Thursday, July 22 

Examinations second term Saturday, August 28 

Fall Quarter 

Faculty meeting, 4:00 P. M Wednesday, September 22 

Freshman assembly in 

Auditorium, 9:00 A. M Thursday, September 23 

Freshman registration Thurxiay, September 23 

Freshman preliminary tests Friday-Saturday, September 24-25 

I'pperclassman registration Friday, September 24 

Classes begin Monday, September 27 

Test Friday, October 22 

Faculty meeting Friday, October 29 

Armistice Day address Thursday, November 1 1 

Test Wednesday, November 24 

Thanksgiving holidays Thursday-Saturday, November 25-27 

Examinations Wednesday-Friday, December 15-17 

Homecoming Monday, December 20 

Christmas holidays December 18-January 2 

Winter Quarter 

Registration Monday, January 3 

Classes begin Tuesday, January 4 

Test Friday, January 28 

Faculty meeting Wednesday, February 2 

Institute of Citizenship Friday, February 4 

Test Friday, February 26 

Examinations Tuesday-Thursday, March 14-16 

Winter quarter closes Thursday. March 16 

Spring Quarter 
Registration Monday, March 20 

Classes begin Tuesday. March '21 

Georgia Educational Association 

Meeting — classes suspended To be announced 

Test Friday, April 14 

Faculty meeting Wednesday, April 19 

Examinations Tuesday-Thursday, May 30-June 1 

Faculty meeting Friday, June 2 

President's reception Friday, June 2 

Sophomore-Alumni luncheon Saturday, June 3 

( iraduat ion exercises Monday, June 5 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Her8CHEL V, Jenkins Chairman 

William Murphei V ice-Chairman 

Michael J. Egan Mrs. Julian K. Quattlebaum 

Thomas Gamble, Ex Officio Mrs. Charles I). Russell 
Herbert L. Kayton John L. Sutlive, Ex Officio 

THE FACULTY 
*J. Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A., LL. D President 

Foreman M. Hawes, A. B., M.S Dean of Students 

and Acting President 

Reuben W. Holland A.B., M.A. . . . Registrar and Treasurer 

\Y. Orson Beecher, A.B. and M.A., Emory University; M.A., 
University of Georgia. 

Instructor in Romance Languages and History. 

Everett L. Bishop, Jr., A.B. and M.S., Emory University; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa. 

Instructor in Biology and Meteorology. 

Ernest William Braithwaite, Master Mariner. 
Instructor in Navigation. 

Mrs. Amy W. Brandon, B.S. in H.E., University of Tennessee. 
Instructor in Home Economics. 

*William M. Dabney, A.B. and M.A., University of Virginia. 
Instructor in History and Political Science. 

Mildred Gladys Feagin, B.S., University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Physical Science. 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., Mercer University; M.S., Emory 
University. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 



it) ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Reuben \\ . Holland, AH. and M.A., Emory [Jnivereity. 
Instructor in Romana Languages. 

*( !harle8 B. Kestleb, A.B. and M.A., [Iniversity of North ( Carolina. 
Instructor in English, 

Ai.\i.\ L. McLendon, Jb., B.S.E., Georgia Teachers College; M.A., 
Peabody ( k)llege. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Physu 

Jeanne Lavendeb Pattebson, B.S., [Jniversity of Georgia; M.S.. 

[Iniversity of Wisconsin. 

Instructor in Home Economics. 

Mebvin Shivers, B.S.E., Georgia Teachers Coll 2 
Instructor in Typewriting and Short ha ml. 

Margaret Fortson Stephens, A.B., LLB., and M.A., University 
of Georgia; certificat, La Sorbonne, Pari-. 
Instructor in English. 

*Robert M. Stbahl, B.S.C., and M.A., Ohio State University. 
Instructor in Finance and Commerce. 

Helen E. Woodward, B.S. in L.S., Peabody College. 
Librarian. 

Marjorie A. Mosley, Associate in Finance and Commerce, Arm- 
strong Junior College. 
Secretary. 



* On leave of absence. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA n 

BISTORY, ORGANIZATION, AND AIMS 

For the past few years, Savannah and the Burrounding com- 
munity have fell the need for an institution of higher learning. 
Realising that there is an increasing number of young men and 

women who find it inconvenient <>r inadvisable to continue their 
education at out-of-town colleges, Mayor '1 nomas Gamble and a 
group of leading citizens conceived the idea of establishing a junior 
college in Savannah. These men, working tirelessly over a period 

of months, finally saw their hopes become an actuality when on 
May 27, L935, the City council authorized the establishment of a 
municipally supported junior college to he governed temporarily 
by a commission of fourteen members appointed by the mayor. 
The first commission was composed of the following leading Sa- 
vannah citizens: Chairman, A. Pratt Adams; Vice-Chairman, 
Thomas (iambic; Henry Blun, H. L. Fulton, H. M. Garwes, B. F. 
Gibbons, H. V. Jenkins, H. L. Kayton, Mrs. Mills B. Lane, A. B. 
Lovett, Prank W. Spencer, O. B. Strong, Mrs. Lucy B. Trosdal, 
Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 General Assembly the 
size of the commission was reduced to eight including the Mayor 
and Chairman of the Chatham County Board of PCducation as 
ex officio members. The day before the ordinance creating the 
college was passed, Mayor Gamble announced that the problem 
of housing the new school was solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz 
and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously pre- 
sented their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. Armstrong, 
their husband and father, respectively. Due to the many spacious 
rooms, remarkably few changes were necessary to fit the building 
for college purposes. The Armstrong building, of Italian Renais- 
sance architecture, is one of the most beautiful and expensive college 
buildings in the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded the 
Lucas Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in founding the 
Junior College. In his speech of acceptance Mr. Gamble announced 
that he had received the gift of a building from Mr. Mills B. Lane 
to house classes in finance and commerce, the building to be named 
in honor of the donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings is the 
Herschel V. Jenkins hall erected and equipped by the city of Sa- 
vannah and the federal government at a cost of $70,000. All three 
buildings, standing side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most 



L2 A R M 8 T R ONI ! .1 N I O H COLL K 1 1 K 

beautiful park in the city, which consists of forty acres and is used 

by Armstrong students for recreational purposes. The Georgia 
Historical Society library, to which the students have access, 
the park and lies just across Wnitaker street from the College 
buildings. 

Under the will of the late Carrie Colding one-half of the sale 
price of the Colding residence on Jones Street was conveyed to the 

( 'oil' . 

A $100,000 science building to house Biology, Chemistry and 

Physics was constructed by the city in 1941. This building, the 
Thomas Gamble hall, is equipped with excellent laboratories and 

lecture room-. 

The Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah and the 
adjacent community by giving to the young men and women who 
attend its classes an understanding of the world in which they live 
and an appreciation of the best that has been achieved by w- 
civilization. Its graduates are equipped to continue their studies 
in the junior class of a senior college; but for those who do not 
desire to pursue their work elsewhere, terminal work is offered. 
The College attempts to provide its students with a keener realiza- 
tion of the duties and responsibilities of citizenship and a broader 
conception of the world and its problems. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 13 

REG! ST R AT EON 
Registration will be conducted on .June 12 and l I from 9 to 1 

and 3 to 5. For other registration dates see the calendar. 

In room 105 Jenkins Hall on June 11 at 12:00 and 330, and 

June 1") at 8:20 placement tests will be given all entering student-. 

All students will register on the first floor of the Armstrong 

Building. 'The first room on the right as you enter the building Is 

the place where you secure your schedule. Saturday, June 12 in- 
structors will he on hand to assist students with schedules. 

The schedule will he carried across the hall to room 1 where it 
will he copied. This copy will he carried to room 2 where fees will 
he paid to the treasurer. Students will select one of the following 
com- 

Section 1. Liberal Arts — First two years of A.B. and B.S. and 

other degrees. 

Section 2. Liberal Arts — Premedical or scientific. 

Section 3. Liberal Arts — Preengineering. 

Section 4. Finance and Commerce. 

Section 5. Home Economics. 

All courses are somewhat similar but 2 and 3 will permit more 
mathematics and laboratory science courses to be taken during the 
freshman year. 

War Time Speed-up Program 

The war has made it necessary for practically everybody to 
work hard and continuously. Individuals who are physically and 
mentally in good condition will not be able to justify three months 
of idleness during the summer while the country is at war. All of 
us should do something this summer to produce needed goods and 
services for the nation or better prepare ourselves for future service 
to our country and community. The war effort can be aided tre- 
mendously by you if you will train yourself to do some specialized 
or semi-specialized task. A good college education is a prerequisite 
to most specialized jobs. 

To assist Freshmen and Sophomores a schedule of courses 
covering the summer, fall, winter, and spring terms is enclosed 
and requirements on the various associate degrees are enumerated. 

Students are urged to work out tentative programs covering a 
six quarter period which will include all requirements and electives. 



11 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

This program may be adjusted al the beginning of any quarter. 
Students may enter at the beginning of any quarter. 

Under the speed-up program students will be completing work 
ai the Junior College in August, December, March, and .June; but 

only one eoninieneenient will be held each year, the latter part of 
May or early June. 

Requirements for Admission 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior College 

must be a graduate of an accredited high school with 
sixteen units of credit. 

2. A general average of all high school work amounting to 
five points above the passing grade, when figures are used. 
or one step above passing, when letters are used, will be 
required. 

3. The following specific requirements must also be met : 

A. Eight constants — 3 units in English, 2 units in social 
studies, 2 units in mathematics (1 must be in algebra and 
1 should be in plane geometry), and 1 unit in science. 

B. Eight elect ives — 4 of these electives must be from the 
following subjects. English, social studies, mathematics, 
science, and foreign language. Four units may be from 
the vocational and a vocational groups. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should 
be made out on the proper forms by a competent official of the high 
school and mailed directly to the office of the Registrar. This cer- 
tificate becomes the property of the Junior College and cannot be 
returned to the applicant. 

Fees and Refunds 

Fees will be charged according to the student load in quarter 
hours. A normal load is 16 to 17 quarter hours each term or quarter. 

5 quarter hours $15.00 

10 quarter hours 25.00 

15-17 quarter hours 35.00 

A student who maintains a dean's list average will be permitted 
to take 20 quarter hours a term for 140.00. If for any reason other 
students are permitted to take 20 quarter hours of work the charge 
will be $45.00. 






OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA Ifi 

Students baking laboratory work will be required to pay b 
small fee which is indicated in the description of the courses found 
under "( lourses of Instruction" else where in this bullet in. 

A [ate registration fee of $2.00 will be charged any students 
who fail to register and pay fees on the day designated for regis- 
tration at the beginning of each quarter, unless excused because of 
sickness. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a quarter 

will receive a refund of one-half of the registration fee. No refunds 
will be made after the first thirty days of a term, and no refunds 
will be made to those dismissed from College. 

Courses Drop pal and Transfers 

Special permission is necessary to drop a subject or to trar.sfc r 
from one subject or section to another. 

Explanation of Course Credit 

A course running five hours a week for one quarter carries 5 
quarter hours, or 3-1/3 semester hours, credit. One quarter hour 
credit is allowed for each laboratory period. 



Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented in writing, is a prerequisite to 
honorable dismissal or re-entrance to this institution. Any student 
planning to withdraw should immediately make such intentiors 
known to the administration of the school. 



Dismissals and Permission to Re-register 

All students failing (except in cases excused before exami- 
nations on account of sickness) to pass at least one course other 
than physical education in any one quarter will be dropped from 
the rolls of the College. All students who fail to make an average 
of at least four honor points (not more than one honor point will 
be counted in this reckoning for physical education) during the 
first three quarters' work at the Junior College will not be allowed 
to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students with 



L6 A R M S T RONG .1 D N I R C OLLEGE 

lese than a "C" average al the end of the fourth quarter of college 
work, and at the end of the sixt h quarter of college work a student 
must have an average of three-fourths an honor point per course 
in order to re-register. 



Number Required in Cou • 

Unless at least fifteen students register for the COUTSe DO eour.-e 
will be given without special action. 



Course Requirements for Graduation 

A student must maintain an average of "C" to graduate. 

Quarter 
LIBERAL ARTS Hours 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology) 10 

Economics 21 (Introductory) 5 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 (Literature) or Humanities 1-2 10 

Foreign Language 10 

History 2-3 or 41-42 10 

Mathematics 1 (Introductory) 

or 2 (College Algebra) 5 

Ten hours from following: 

Physical Science 11-12 

Economics 22 

Sociology 60 

Laboratory Sciences 

Foreign Language 10 

Library Science 1 (Use of the Library) 2 

Physical Education 1-2* 8 

Electives 20 

Total 100 



F SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 17 

Quarter 

HOME ECONOMICS Hours 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology) 10 

Chemistry 1-2 (Inorganic) 10 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 (Literature) or Humanities 1-2 10 

Twenty-five hours from following;: 

Art 11 

Chemistry 5 (Organic) 

Home Economics 1 (Clothing) 

Home Economics 2-3 (Foods) 

Home Economics 5 (Home Furnishing) 

Home Economics 6 (Nutrition) 25 

History 2-3 or 41-42 10 

Library Science 1 (Use of the Library) 2 

Mathematics 1 5 

Sociology 60 5 

Physical Education 1-2* 8 

Electives 5 

Total 100 



* An academic course of five quarter hours may be substituted for physical 
education by students who are working in the afternoons. 



is A K M S T RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Quarter 

FINANCE AM) COMMERCE Hours 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology) 10 

Twenty-five hours from following: 
( lommerce 2, 3, 4 (Accounting); 

7 (Money and Hanking) 

10 (Insurance); 14 (Statistics) 25 

Economics 21 (Introductory) and 

22 (World Resources) 10 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 (Literature) or Humanities 1-2 10 

History 2-3 or 41-42 10 

Library Science 1 (Use of the Library) 2 

Mathematics 1 (Introductory) 

or 2 (College Algebra) 5 

Physical Education 1-2* 8 

Electives 10 

Total 100 



* An academic course of five quarter hours may be substituted for physical 
education by students who are working in the afternoons. 






QF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 19 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

English 

:>. Play Production (nol offered 1943 1 1> 

5 hours Lecture, t hours laboratory work a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 
This course includes a fundamental study of production meth- 
ods with emphasis upon the technical aspects of producing plays 
in the modern theatre. 

6. Play Production (not offered 1943-44) 
5 hours lecture a week for one quarter. 

Hay directing and acting, devoted both to the historical and 
the contemporary theatre. 

7. Public Speaking (not offered 1943-44) 
o hours a week for one quarter. 

11-12. Freshman English 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 
(This course was number 11-12-13 and carried credit of 12 
quarter hours in 1941-42. The revised course is 10 quarter hours.) 

23. Early English Literature 

5 hours a w r eek for one quarter. 

24. Recent English Literature 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

25. Masters of American Literature 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Humanities 
1-2. Humanities 

5 hours lecture a week for two quarters. 

Art 

11. Art Principles and Design 

2 lectures and 8 hours laboratory w T ork a week for one 
quarter. Fee S2.50. 
A study of fundamental principles underlying all art. Labora- 
tory work in the use of line, mass, and color. Introduction to color 
theory and lettering. 



20 A RMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

French 

1-2. Elementary French 

."> hours a week for two quarters. 

7. Introduction to Literature 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

8. French Classical Drama 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

9. French Short Stories (not offered 1943-44) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

10. Contemporary Literature (not offered 1943-44) 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Spanish 

1-2. Elementary Spanish 

5 hours a week for two quarters. 
3. Intermediate Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

5. Commercial Spanish 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

6. Modern Prose Readings 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



OF 3- A V ANN AH, GEORGIA 21 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
AND MATHEMATICS 

Biological Sen ru 

:\. Invertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 

3 hours Lecture and (> hours laboratory a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. 

4. General Vertebrate Zoology (Prerequisite Biology 11-12) 

A hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee S2.50. 
1 1-12. Human Biology 

.") hours a week for two quarters. Materials fee SI. 00. 
(No refund.) 
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of 
general biological principles, particularly as applied to the human 
organism. 

21. Clinical Technic 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $3.50. Deposit $2.50. 

Physical Sciences 

1-2. General Inorganic Chemistry 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for two 
quarters. Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage deposit 
$2.50. (12 quarter hours credit.) 

3. Inorganic Qualitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chemistry 
1-2) 

4 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage deposit $3.00. 

4. Inorganic Quantitative Analysis (Prerequisite Chemistry 1-2) 

2 hours lecture and 9 hours laboratory per week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage deposit $3.00. 

5. Elements of Organic Chemistry (Prerequisite Chemistry 
1-2) (not offered 1943-44) 

3 hours lecture and 6 hours laboratory per week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $2.50. Breakage deposit $3.00. 

11-12. Physical Science 

5 hours a week for two quarters. Materials fee $1.00. 
(No refund) 






A R M 8 T RONG JUNIOR C DLLEGE 

Thifl course is ;i survey of the physical sciences. The subject 
matter is taken from the fields of physic-, chemistry, astronomy, 
geology, and geography. In general, the objectives of the course 

are to make one more familiar with the physical phenomena of our 
environment; to develop an appreciation of the scientific method: 
and to furnish a cultural and general informational background 
which may be used as a foundation for future work by those stu- 
dents whose interests may lie in the field of the physical BCiences. 
21-22-23. General Physics 

4 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory work per week 
for three quarters. Laboratory fee 12.50 per quart* r. 
Deposit S2.50. 

Meteorology 

1. Weather Elements 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

Nat igation 

1. Air and Marine Navigation 

4 hours a week for one-half quarter. (Credit: 2 quarter 
hours 

2. Air and Marine Navigation 

4 hours a week for one-half quarter. (Credit : 2 quarter 
hours.) 

Mathematics 

1. A Survey of Mathematics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

A beginning course in algebra, statistics, finance and trigo- 
nometry. 

2. College Algebra 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

3. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry through the circle 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

4. Analytic Geometry 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
8. Spherical Trigonometry and Mathematics of Aviation 
T) hours a week for one quarter. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

DIVISION OF social 8CIEN( I - 

History 

2. Europe Since L870 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

3. United States Sine- L870 

T) hours a week for one quarter. 

(). Latin America 

T) hours a week for one quarter. 

41-42. Comparative American History 
5 hours a week for two quarters. 



Political Science 

12. National Government of the United States 
5 hours a week for one quarter. 

13. State and Local Government 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



Economics 

21. Introductory Economics 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

22. World Resources 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



Psychology 

31. Introductory Psychology 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



Sociology 

60. The Family 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



24 \ R M 8 T RONO JUNIOR COLL K G E 

DIVISION OF FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

2-3. Introductory Accounting 

3 hours Lectures and J hours laboratory a week for two 
quarters. 

4. Accounting Problems 

3 lectures and I hours laboratory a week. 

5. Marketing (Not offered L943-44 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
7. Money and Banking 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
10. Insurance 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 

14. Elements of Statistics (Prerequisite Mathematics 1) 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 
31-32. Field Work 

15 hours per week for two quarters Credit, 10 quarter 

hours. 

This course has served as a means of bridging the gap that 
exists between the School of Finance and Commerce and the actual 
business world. All finance and commerce students, interested in 
registering for this course, make application at the beginning of the 
school year. Arrangement is made for those applicants acceptable 
by the instructor to work as internes in Savannah business organi- 
zations. Students make confidential monthly reports, along with 
other assigned projects, to the instructor, while at the same time 
confidential monthly reports are being made on the work of the 
internes by his or her employer. Although this is a field in which 
Armstrong is pioneering, the program has been very successful in 
the past. This success has been primarily due to the cooperation 
of Savannah business men and their interest in a high type of 
personnel. 

51. Typewriting 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 2 quarter hours. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. No refund will be made to stu- 
dents permitted to drop this course. 

52. Advanced Typewriting 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 2 quarter hours. 
Laboratory fee $3.50. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

.">:;. Advanced Typewrit ing 

."> hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 2 quarter hours. 

Laboratory fee §3.f>0. 
81. ( iregg Shorthand 

5 hours a week For one quarter. Credit, 3 quarter hours. 
62, Advance Gregg Shorthand 

5 hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 3 quarter hours. 
83. Advance Gregg Shorthand 

.") hours a week for one quarter. Credit, 3 quarter hours. 



DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Clothing 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one quarter. 

2. Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one quarter. 
Laboratory fee $5.00. 

3. Advanced Foods 

3 lectures, 6 hours laboratory each week for one quarter. 
Laboratory fee $5.00. 

5. Home Planning and Furnishing 

4 lectures, 2 hours laboratory each week for one quarter. 
A study of planning and furnishing the home. 

6. Nutrition 

5 hours a week for one quarter. 



■2i\ A R M STRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
LIBRARY SCIENCE AND AERONAUTICS 

1. Freshman Physical Education 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 

2. Sophomore Physical Education 

3 hours a week throughout the year. 

3. Dancing 
3 hours a week throughout the year. 

4. Advanced Dancing 
3 hours a week throughout the year. 

Library Science 

1. 2 hours a week for one quarter. 2 hours credit. 

A short course in the facilities and use of the library is required 
of all freshmen. Instruction in bibliography making and note tak- 
ing are included in this course. 

Aeronautics 

21. Ground Instruction 

6 hours a week for one quarter. 



o F 



\ \ \ N N A II 



GEORGIA 



27 



STUDENTS ENROLLED L942 13 
Bummer, Fall, Winter, Spring 334 

Listed twice 38 

Total 296 

GRADUATES, L942 



ASSOCIATE in 

Billie Ruth Anchors 
Ann Rose Barbee 
Edward Bercegeay 

A. J. Cohen. Jr. 

Betty Collins 

Walter Coolidge 

Fret well Cricler 
Lucy Dodd 
Lucretia Edwards 

Andrew Ernst 
Agnes Feuger 
Winifred Fulghum 
Herbert Griffin 
Eugene Griner 
Murray Grossman 
Lucille Guerard 
Margaret Haile 
Anne Harms 
Ethel Hill 
Mary Ann Hood 
Jo Beth Huff 
Edward Javetz 
Selma Jaworek 
Rachel Jones 
Helen Kibler 
Marjorie McFarland 



LIBERAL ARTS 

Madalyne MansoD 

Carol Minis 
Augusta Montague 
Elizabeth Morgan 
Jeanette Mosley 
Audrey Newton 
Jane O'Connor 
William Parr 
William Rentz 
Alberta Robertson 
Jean Saunders 
Ruth Schur 
Annie Laurie Seigler 
Irving Sklansky 
Carlyle Smith 
Carolyn Smith 
Julia Storer 
Betty Street 
Charles Usher, Jr. 
Patten Watson, Jr. 
Earl Weatherly 
Maud West 
Margaret White 
Carolyn Williams 
Martha Williams 
Benjamin Wills 



Alice Zerman 



ASSOCIATE IN FINANCE AND COMMERCE 
Katharine Durden Bertha Holt 

Thomas Fly the John Ranitz 

Kathryn Hardwick John Sullivan 



ASSOCIATE IN 
Debs Bernstein 
Josephine Elliott 
Kathleen Harms 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Frances Mayhew 
Ollireid New 
Dorothv Newton 



Margaret Purdum 



28 



A R M S T R o N G •! I N I O R C L I. E < I E 



STUDENTS ATTENDING ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 

COLLEGE 1942 43 



SUMMER SESSION 1942 



Alexander, Louise 
A nest os, Harry 

B 

Bailey, Sam 
Bennett, Dorothy 
Berg, Hilda 
Blake, Robert 
Bowyer, Lucy 
Bradley, Milton 
Brewer, Jewel 
Brewin, Lee 
Burton, Frances 
Butler, Ellen 



Clapp, Josephine 

Clarke, Fred W. 

Cobb, Carswell 

Cohen, Dena 

Collins, Perry 

Cone, William 

Cottingham, Ida 

Cox, Cynthia 

Coyle, Catherine Elizabeth 

Crosbv, Oscar 



DeLoach, Eunice 
DeLoach, Jean 
Dendy, Mrs. Alice 
Dillon, Wayne 
Dotson, Louise 
Douglas, J. Paul 

E 

Egan, Joan 
Elliott, Mary Lou 

F 

Fulmer, Mary 

G 

Gannam, Michael 
Glynn, Jeanette 
Graham, William 
Griffin, Beverly F. 

H 

Hancock, William Roy 

J 

Jordan, William 

K 

Kirkland, Anne 
Kitchens, Darriel 



Lain, Eugenia 

LaRoche, Nolle Elizabeth 

Lippitt, Anita 



M 



Maclean, Betty 

Mallard, Jean 
Manning, Arthur 
Marsh, Mary E. 
Marshall, Caroline 
McDermott, Margaret 
Morrell, Katherine 
Mosley, Jeanette 
Muchmore, Robert 

N 
Newton, Thomas Jackson 
Nichols, Nancy 
Norris, Celeste 

O 
O'Brien, Martha 

P 
Paddison, J. Robert 
Parr, William H. 
Prescott, Margaret 
Pritchard, Sarah E. 

R 
Reddish, Russell 
Redmond, Robert 
Rhodes, Jack 
Rhodes, Mrs. Miriam P. 
Riedel, Augustus 

S 
Saul, Semon 
Shoob, Marvin 
Siegel, Melvin 
Smith, Rosa 
Smithberg, Leon 
Sprague, Isabel 
Stallings, Henry 
Stein, Murray 
Steinheimer, Henrietta 
Sullivan, Sara 
Sutcliffe, Marjorie 

T 
Tatum, Sue 

Taylor, Mrs. Louise M. 
Taylor, Mrs. Marion W. 
Thigpen, Fred 
Thorpe, Kathleen 

l" 
rilman, A. J. 
Ulman, Celia Rebecca 

V 
Vannerson, Jessie 

W 
Wade, Austin 
Walsh, Mrs. Charles H. 
Warner, Marguerite 
Webster, Rebecca 
Wolfe. Helen 
Wolfe, Henrietta 
Wren, Mrs. Lillian 



i 



S A V A \ \ \ 



GE0RG1 \ 



." 



STUDENT BODY L942 13 

Bummer, Fall, Winter, Spring 334 

Listed twice 38 

Total 296 



Adler, Lee 
Uexander, Louise 

Anderson, M. S. 
Ancstos, Barry 

Argmtar, Sain 
AronotT, Nonnan 
AronofT, Stanley 
Askew, Mrs. Thomas 

B 

Baggs, Charles 
Ball, Sam H., Jr. 
Barnes, Leonard M. 
Barnes, Marguerite 
Beasley, Marion D. 
Bedinger, Mrs. W. E. 
Beecher, Bettv 
Bell, Archie H. 
Bell, Edward W., Jr. 
Bell, Miller Lee, Jr. 
Belsinger, Miss Esther R. 
Bennett, Dorothy 
Berg, Joseph W., Jr. 
Bergen, Joe 

Berry, Mrs. Helen Jean 
Berry, William O. 
Bidez, William A. 
Black, Mrs. James R. 
Blair, Robert K. 
Blun, William A. 
Bono, Julian M. 
Boone, Virginia 
Boroughs, Samuel C, Jr. 
Brewin, Sidney Lee 
Brown, Winifred 
Brunson, Julanie 
Bull, Coren 
Bullock, Floy V. 
Butler, Betty 



Cahoon, Leonard F. 
Carson, Clare 
Carter, H. A. 
Casey, Margaret Mary 
Cavanah, John 
Cheatham, Frank S., Jr. 
Ciucevich, John 
Cobb, Carswell 
Cohen, Dena 



Cone, Thomas 

Cooper, Shirley 

Cornell, Virginia 

Cottingham, Ida 

Cox, Cynthia 

Coyle, Catherine Elizabeth 

Craig, Stephen F. 

Crane, Shirley 

Cranman, Herman 

Culpepper, Wesley Lee 

Curlee, James Walter 

D 
Davis, Harriet 
Davis, Rosetta 
DeLoach, Eunice 
Dillon, Wayne 
Dougherty, Bernard 
Douglas, Allen 
Dukes, Jean 
Dyar, Gene Forrest 



Edel, Virginia 
Edwards, W. H., Jr. 
Elliott, Mary Lou 
Elmore, Catherine 



Fawcett, Dorothy 
Foy, Mary 
Futrell, Hugh 



Gannam, Michael 
Goldberg, Harold 
Goodin, Sara Jo 
Goolsby, Janie 
Griner, Betty 
Groover, John T., Jr. 
Guest, Charlotte 
Guthrie, Donald 

H 
Haile, Margaret 
Hamilton, Melvin F. 
Hamm, Mrs. Claudia L. 
Hancock, Roy 
Hardy, Betty 
Harper, P. C. 
Hathaway, C. O. 



30 



A R M S T RONG .1 l' X [OR COLLEGE 



Henderson, Irvine ( \, .lr. 

Herrmann, .lean Eliiabel ti 

Hitt, Hetty 
Hoffman, Minnie 

Holland, Tafl C. 
Hubert, Betty 
1 1 ussey, Paul 

I 
II. ley, Sally 

Isley, ( reorge Howard 

.1 
Johnson, Harney 

Johnston, Mart ha Sue 
Jones, Virginia 



Kahn, Lorraine 
Kanter, Harriet 
Kenny, Mary 
Kenny, Pauline 
Key, Mary Louise 
Kicklighter, Gloria 
King, John B. 
Kirkland, Anne 
Kitchens, Darriel 
Kolgaklis, Theodore 



Lain, Eugenia 
Lang, David S. 
Lang, Jacob 
LaRoche, Elizabeth 
Lasky, Aneta 
Lattimore, Harry H. 
Lax, Harold 
Leigh, Beverly 
Littlefield, Patricia 
Littlejohn, Annie Laurie 
Long, Leslie 
Lubs, Elsie 
Lyons, Marie 

M 
McDermott, Margaret 
McLendon, Mrs. Alvin L. 
Mallard, Jean 
Mai lory, James 
Manning, Arthur 
Marcus, Gertrude 
Marshall, Caroline 
Martin, Jane 
Mayo, Mc( rregor 
Meddin, Audrey 
Meddin, Phyllis 
Melaver, Norton 
Milich, Milan Mike 
Monette, Robert J. 
Montgomery, Meegan 
Mooney. James 



Moran, Frances E. 

Morns, Clinton 
Morris, Jame> M. 

Movsovit/., Leona 
Murphy, Hinckley 
Murphy, Mary 

N 

Nelson, Marian 
Nettles, Armond L. 
Newton, Benny Jane 
Newton, Jack 
Xorris, Celeste 

<) 
O'Brien, Noreen 
Ockershausen, Henry 
Odrezin, Gilbert 
O'Leary, Joseph 
Oppen, Mary 



Paderewsky, Helen 
Palmer, William J. 
Peacock, Howard O. 
Perkins, Doris 
Perry, Ann 
Perry, Frank L. 
Persse, Margaret 
Pichler, Floyd 
Poindexter, June 

R 
Rabb, Roy 

Rainer, Robert 
Reddish, Russell 
Redmond, Robert 
Reed, Samuel 
Reiser, John \Y. 
Rentz, W. H. 
Ricks, Robert 
Rimes, Mary LaCora 
Roberts, Delphina 
Rose, John 
Rosin, John C. 
Rosolio, Alan 



Salas, Helen 
Saul. Semon 
Schwitz, [sadore 
Seabrook, Mary 

Sexton, James W. 
Shegirian, Perry 
Sheppard, J. Davis 
Siegel, Melvin 
Sinclair, Hetty Ann 
Sinclair, Lawrence 
Smith, Alvie 
Smith, Betty 
Smith, Carolyn 



OF BAVANNAB 



G 1 ORG 1 \ 



31 



Smith, Joseph lv. 

Sunt h, Marion ( 'at herm 
Smith, Rosa 
Smith. Thomas 

Smithberg, Leon 
Solms, Ida Lee 
Sowell, Raymond II. 
Spivey, Ed* in II. 
Stephenson, Bobbie 

Stewart. Mariatm 

Suddath, Mary Ann 

Sullivan, Sara 

Suiter. Bette 

Summers, I )ouald .1. 
Swinford, Reese 

Swint, ( ieraldine 

T 
Tabakian, ( ieorge 
Tanenbaum, David E. 

'l'arver, .lames \Y. 
Tat urn, Sue 



Thigpen, Pred 

Thorpe, K.I t hlrrii 

Trebony. Louie 
Tunno, ( 'hampneya 



\ annerson, Jessie 
Yarn, [lose E. 

w 
Waites, Janie 
\\ .irner. Marguerite 
Webster, Rebecca 
Weiser, Rosalyn 

Wheeler, Mary 
Wilkin, Paul E. 
Williams, Harry M. 

Williams, Margarel 
Wolfe. Helen 
Wolfe, Kenneth 
Woodward, Sybil 
Wright, Thomas 



STUDENT NURSES 



Branson, Blanche 
Brunson, Susie 
Collins, Mary 
De Loach, Annie Marian 
Denmark, Doris 
Edwards, Essie 
Hammond, Orie Mae 
Jarrett, Elizabeth 
Jeffers, Bernard ine 



Lee, Ruth 
McLamb, Lillian 
McLamb, Miriam 
McTeer, Muriel 
Smith, Mariodean 
Smith, Mildred 
Voss, Kathryn 
Zipperer, Virginia 



s C II E I) D L E 



SUMMER 

(Ml 



l [RSI I I i:m 

1 und ."» Periods: 



( !hemistry 


1 


Mathemath - 


_> 


Human Biology 


1! 


-h 


3 


Borne Economics 




Commerce 


51 



2 and 4 Periods: 

Physical Science 1 1 

Spanish 1 

English 24 

3 and 6 Periods: 

Mathematics 8 

Commerce 

Sociology 60 

History 11 

SECOND TERM 

1 and 5 Periods: 

Chemistry 2 

Spanish 6 

Human Biology 12 

2 and 4 Periods: 

History 42 

Physical Scien 

3 and 6 Periods: 

Chemistry 4 

Psychology 31 

Spanish 2 



FALL 

1MJ 

1st Period 

Commerce 2 

Mathematics 2 

Spanish 1 

French 1 

Hon,.- I Iconomics 5 

2nd Period 

English 11 

Home Economics 1 

Library Science 1 

Psychology 31 

3rd Period 

Humanities 1 

Biology 11 

Commerce 51 

History <"> 

4th Period 

Mathematics 1 

Biology 4 

Commerce...- 61 

Spanish 5 

Library Science 1 

5th Period 

Biology 4 

Chemistry 1 

Physio 21 

6th Period 

Commerce 51 

Library Science 1 

7th Period 

P. E. 
Labs. 



\M\ I IK 
1944 

I -I Period 

Commerce .'5 

Mathematics 3 

Spanish 2 

French _' 
HomeEconoD 

2nd Period 

English 12 

Home Economics 2 
Human Biolofl 

3rd Period 

Human Biology 12 
Commerce 52 

History . ..... 11 

»th Period 

English 11 

Biology 3 

Commerce 62 

Mathematics 8 

Spanish G 

5th Period 

Biology 3 

Chemistry- 2 

Physics 22 

6th Period 
Commerce— 

7lh Period 

P. E. 
Labs. 



SPRING 

lyti 



Commerce 1 

Mathematics 4 

Spanish 3 

French 7 

Sociology 80 

English 12 
Human Biolog 

Sociology 60 

Humanities I 

Biology 1 1 

Commerce S3 

History 13 

Psychology 11 
Horn.- Econoi 

Commerce 

Economii - 

Biology -'1 
Chemist". 

- ; 

Commerce .... S I 



P E 

Labs. 



'944-' 945 



= 



>( MMER — FALL — WINTER — SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 



A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




MEMBERSHIP IN 
American Association of Junior Colleges 



farf 

* / U* ~r Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 



Association of Georgia Colleges 



Volume IX 



Number 1 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



I 



^T & 



"Education is a companion which no misfor- 
tune can depress — no crime destroy no en- 
emy alienate — no despotism enslave 4t home. 
a friend; abroad, an introduction : in soli- 
tude, a solace; and in society, an ornament." 



tir 




ARMSTRONG BUILDING 



18338 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



4 \ R \1>TR()\C J I N 10R COLLEGE 

CALENDAR L94445 

Summer Quarter 

Registration Monday, June 12 

< lasses begin Tuesday, June 13 

Examinations fii»t term Kri<la\. Jul) 21 

Registration second term Friday, Jul> 21 

Classes begin Morulas. July 21 

Examinations second term Thursday, August 31 



Fall Quarter 

Freshman registration Thursday, September 21 

Freshman preliminary tests Friday-Saturday, Sept. 22-23 

I pperclassman registration Friday, September 22 

Classes begin Monday, September 25 

Test Friday, October 20 

Vrmistice Day Address Thursday, November 9 

Tesl Wednesday November 29 

Thanksgiving Holidays Thursday-Saturday, Nov. 30-Dec. 2 

Examinations Friday, Monday. Tuesday, Dec. 15-19 

Homecoming Friday, December 22 

Christmas Holidays December 20-January 2 



Winter Quarter 

Registration Tuesday, January 2 

Classes begin Wednesday. January 3 

Test Friday. January 26 

Institute of Citizenship To be announced 

Tesl Friday. February 23 

Examinations Wednesday-Friday. March 14-16 

\\ inter Quarter closes Friday. March 16 



Spring Quarter 

Registration Tuesday, March 20 

Classes begin Wednesday. March 21 

Test Friday, April 13 

Open House Wednesday, \pril 18 

Examinations Wednesday-Friday. May 30-June 1 

President's Reception Friday, June 1 

Sophomore-Alumni luncheon Saturday, June 2 

Graduation Exercises Monday, June 4 



I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

III rs( hel V. Jenkins Chairman 

William Murphei I ice-Chairman 

Michael J. Egan Mrs. h uan K. Q\ milium m 

Thomas Gamble, Ex Officio Mrs. Charles D. Russell 

Herbert L. Kwton John L. Sutltve, Ex Officio 

Fred \\ essels 

THE FACULTY 

*J. Thomas ASKEW, Ph.B.. M.A., LL.D President 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., M.S Dean of Students 

and Acting President 

Rei BEN \\ . Holland, A.B., M.A Registrar and Treasurer 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B. and M.A., Emory University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Georgia 

Instructor in Romance Languages and History. 

1 Elizabeth Ltnes Beecher. A.B., University of Georgia 

Instructor in English. 

Everett L. Bishop. Jr.. A.B. and M.S., Emory University; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa 

Instructor in Biology and Meteorology. 

"William M. Dabney, A.B. and M.A., University of Virginia 
Instructor in History and Political Science. 

Mildred Gladys Feagin, B.S., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., Mercer University; M.S., Emory University 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

Reuben W. Holland, A.B. and M.A., Emory University 
Instructor in Romance Languages. 



6 ARMSTRONG JUNIOJR CO L LEGE 

'Charles B. Kestler, \.li. and \1.\.. I niversitj of \<>rth Carolina 
Instructor in English. 

Jeanni Patterson Olson, 15. S.. University of Georgia; M.S.. Uni- 

wrsih i»i \\ ix-nnsin 

Instructor in Home Economics. 

Mervin Shivers, B.S.E., Georgia Teachers Coll*-, 

Instructor in Typewriting and Shorthand. 

Margaret Fortson Stephens, A.B., LL.B., and M.A., University of 
Georgia; certificat, La Sorbonne, Paris 
Instructor in English. 

•Robert M. Strahl, B.S.C., and M.A., Ohio State University 
Instructor in Finance and Commerce. 

Helkn Elizabeth Woodward, B.A.. Maryville College; B.S. in L.S., 
Peabody College; M.A., Vanderbilt Universit) 

Librarian. 

M \kjorie A. Mosley. Associate in Finance and Commerce. Armstrong 
Junior College 
Secretary. 



On leave of absence. 
Part time. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 7 

HISTORY, ORG WI/VI ION \\l> \l\l^ 

Realizing thai there was an increasing numbei of young men and 
women who found it inconvenient or inadvisable to continue theii edu« 
cation at out-of-town colleges, Mayor Thomas Gamble and a group 
of leading citizens conceived the idea of establishing a junior college 
in Savannah. These men, working tirelessl) over a period <>f months, 

finall) saw their hopes become an aetnalits when on \Ia\ 27. L935, 
the Hoard of \ldermen authorized the establishment of a municipally 

supported junior college to be governed temporarily b\ a commission 
of fourteen members appointed by the mayor. The first commission 
was composed oJ the following leading Savannah citizens: Chairman. 
A. Pratt Vdams; Vice-Chairman, Thomas Gamble: Henry Blun, 
H. L. Fulton. H. M. Garwes, H. F. Gibbons, H. \. Jenkins. H. L. Kayton, 
Mrs. Mills B. Lane, A. B. Lovett, Frank W. Spencer, 0. B. Strong, 
Mrs. Lucy B. Trosdal, Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 
General Assembly the size of the commission was reduced to eight, 
including the Mayor and Chairman of the Chatham County Board 
of Education as ex-officio members. The day before the ordinance 
creating the college was passed, Mayor Gamble announced that the 
problem of housing the new school was solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz 
and her daughter. Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously presented 
their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. Armstrong, their 
husband and father, respectively. Because of the many spacious rooms, 
remarkably few changes were necessary to fit the building for college 
purposes. The Armstrong Building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, 
is one of the most beautiful and expensive college buildings in the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded the Lucas 
Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in founding the Junior Col- 
lege. In his speech of acceptance, Mr. Gamble announced that he had 
received the gift of a building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house classes 
in finance and commerce, the building to be named in honor of the 
donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings is the 
Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, erected and equipped by the city of Savannah 
and the federal government at a cost of $70,000. All three buildings, 
standing side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park 
in the city, which consists of forty acres and is used by Armstrong 
students for recreational purposes. The Georgia Historical Society 






8 ARMSTRONG Jl NIOR COLLEGE 

Library, t<» which the Btudents have access, Faces the park and lies just 
across \\ hitaker sheet from the college buildings. 

I nder the will of the Late Carrie Colding, one-half of the sale price of 
the Colding residence on Jones Street was conveyed t<> the College. 

\ S 100.000 science building to house biology, chemistry and physics 

was constructed l»\ the cit) in L941. This building, the Thomas Gamble 
Hall, is equipped with excellent laboratories and lecture rooms. 

Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah and the adja- 
cent community l>\ fixing to the young men and women who attend it- 
classes an understanding of the world in which they live and an appre- 
ciation of the best that has been achieved h\ western civilrzation. Its 
graduates are equipped to continue their studies in the junior class 
of a senior college; but for those who do not desire to pursue their work 
elsewhere, terminal work is offered. The college attempts to provide 
its students with a keener realization of the duties and responsibilities 
of citizenship and a broader conception of the world and its problems. 

Library 

The college library, occupying the entire third floor of the Armstrong 
building, includes two beautiful and well-lighted reading rooms, and 
houses at present approximately 6,000 volumes, with frequent and care- 
fully chosen additions to its resources. Emphasis is being placed cur- 
rently on securing books dealing with war and peace, as well as on 
obtaining materials to meet the regular academic demands of a junior 
college. Standard reference works are contained in the library, and 
some 80 periodicals are subscribed to, or otherwise currently received. 
Subscription to six newspapers, four of them daily, is maintained. The 
library is fortunate in having been chosen recently as the recipient of 
a large and outstanding collection of historj books, the gift of Mr. 
Thomas Gamble. Mayor of the City of Savannah. 

Students are encouraged to read widely in the fields of fiction and 
non-fiction, and in particular to keep up with current periodical ma- 
terials. In addition to the resources of the college library, students are 
invited to use the Savannah Public Library and the Libiar\ of the 
Georgia Historical Society, the latter onlj one-half block from the 
Junior College. An orientation course, dealing in part with training 
in the use of the library, Is offered in the fall quarter of each year. 

The library, which is under the supervision of a trained librarian 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 9 

and three student assistants, is open each week-da) from 8:30 until 6:00, 
and on Saturdays from 9:00 until 1 :()<). 

Laboi tUoi ies 

The college bas completely equipped laboratories in physics, chenv 
istry, biology, and borne economics. 

Scholarships 

The income from money donated by Mrs. Arthur C. Lucas in mem- 
or) of ber husband is used for scholarship grants to assist deserving 
students. The original gift of $10,000 has been invested as The Arthur 
C. Lucas Trust Fund, 

Several work-scholarships are granted each year by the college to 
a limited number of students. Such scholarships are awarded on a 
basis of scholastic ability and need. 

Student Activities 

With a firm belief in the developmental function of individual or 
concerted group expression, Armstrong Junior College has made student 
activities an integral part of its program, with participation in one or 
more of its organizations expected of every student. At the end of each 
college year, at the Alumni Luncheon in June, those students who have 
taken part to an outstanding extent in college activities throughout the 
year are awarded a silver "A". A point system, gauging leadership 
activity and ability, determines who shall be the recipients of these 
awards. 

STUDENT SENATE 

The Student Senate is composed of the following representatives: the 
presidents of the sophomore and freshman classes; the editor of the 
Inkwell; the editor of the Geechee; one representative from each or- 
ganization recognized by the Senate; and two freshman representatives 
to be elected by the class one week after election of class officers. This 
group, which meets from time to time throughout the year, serves as 
the official student agency for coordinating college activities and for 
expressing student opinion. 



10 \K\l^li:i)\(, .11 \H)R COLLEGE 

i ii i COUNCIL <»n FOREIGN Hi LAI [ONS 

The Council on Foreign Relations meets twice each month for con- 
sideration of current topics of international import. Lectures <>r reports 
arc given l>\ outside speakers, <»r 1>\ students 01 faculty advisor, and 
livel) discussion results. I p-to-date maps are kept available to the 

Club at all times, and current pamphlets and other materials are gen- 
erous!) disseminated. 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

The Home Economics Department maintains a club which meets 
bi-monthl) for discussion of current problems. In addition to its reg- 
ular scheduled meetings, this club is frequently responsible for the 
preparation and serving of refreshments at teas, dances, and receptions. 
In the decoration of student lounge rooms and a home economics 
class-room for art courses, practical experience is obtained in the pur- 
chase of furnishings, and in their effective arrangement and use. 

MUSIC CLUB 

The Music Club meets twice each month for programs of classical 
recorded music. Varied and well-balanced programs of symphony and 
chamber music are arranged, and occasionally music of a lighter vein 
is included. Before each concert in the city, the Music Club presents 
the outstanding works announced for the concert, and in this manner 
serves to build up in its members a familiarity with classical music. 

RIDING CLUB 

The Riding Club meets each Saturday morning for rides through the 
beautiful wooded bridle paths of the Ranch Riding School. Expert in- 
struction in riding is given all beginners, and supervision is provided 
at all times if desired. Membership in this club may serve as a part of 
the students physical education requirements. A small monthly fee 
is charged. 

ATHLETIC TEAMS 

Basketball. Softball, and bowling teams are supervised by the Physical 
Education Department. These teams play in the city tournaments. 

SORORITIES 

There are two social sororities recognized by the college: Alpha Tau 
Beta and Delta Chi. Membership in these groups is by invitation. 



01 SAVANNAH. GEORGIA 



I'l KIM \ I IONS 



Students have complete responsibility foi t In- t w • > Armstrong publics 
tions: tin- Inkwell, a monthly newspaper; and the Geechee, tin- college 
annual. \\«»ik .»n the Inkwell provides opportunity for news reporting, 
feature writing, and other expression ol Btudent opinion and talent, as 
well as for actual experience in the business management of a news- 
paper. Participation in the preparation of the Geechee furnishes excel- 
lent experience in photography, lay-out, and in organization generally. 
Here, too. facility in handling and financing a publication is acquired 
or increased. 

>\\ \\\ \\\ PLA1 hoi SE 

The Savannah lMa\ house, a community theater sponsored and di- 
rected 1>\ the college, gives the students actual experience in acting, 
make-up, and the techniques of production. Discontinued for the dura- 
tion, the Playhouse will he re-opened as soon as practicable after the war. 

INS HI l TE OF CITIZENSHIP 

Sometime during each year, several days are devoted to the Institute 
of Citizenship, to which outstanding speakers and leaders from various 
parts of the countrv have been invited. Lecture and discussion groups 
are held for college and townspeople alike, without charge. The object 
of the Institute is the promotion of better citizenship. 

HOME-COMING 

Early in the Christmas holiday season the College holds the annual 
Home-Coming Reception to which all students and Alumni are invited. 

OPEN HOUSE 

Each Spring the College holds an Open House, to which all students, 
parents, prospective students, and townspeople in general are invited. 
At this time exhibits are held, the work of the students displaved. and 
typical scientific experiments demonstrated. Tours are arranged through- 
out the college buildings, and refreshments are served to all visitors 
by the Home Economics Department. 

EVENING CLASSES FOR ADULTS 

To adults interested in advancing their education and information 
Armstrong Junior College offers evening classes in varied subjects. 



12 



ARMSTRONG J I MOR COLLEGE 



These classes carr) full college credit to those students properl) qual- 
ified, but require do specific entrance qualifications other than an 
interest in learning. The classes meet twice b week in one and one-half 
hour periods at times arranged to suit the convenience of the students. 

Belon are listed courses which have proved particularl) popular in 
the past; in addition to those listed, courses will 1»«- organized in an\ 

subject for which sufficient demand e\i-t~. 
Biolog) 1 1-12. Human Biolog] ■ 

English 11. The I se of the English Language. Spoken and Written. 
Historj 1<». World Problems Since L91 \. 

Mathematics 1. A Survej Course in Principles of Mathematics. 
Psychology 32. Applied Psychology. 
Psychology 33. Social Psychol 
Spanish 1-2. Introductory Spanish. 




OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 13 

i;i «.i-i i; vi i<>\ 

Registration will be conducted on June 12 from 9:00 to 1 mm i and 3:00 
t<> 5:00. I di othei registration dates Bee the calendar. Ml students will 
registei on the first il<".i oi the Armstrong Building in the registrai b 
office. 

Registration is not complete until fees are paid. 

// m Time Speed-l p Program 

The war has made it necessar) for practically everybody t<» work 
hard and continuously. Individuals who arc physicall) and mentallj 
in good condition arc encouraged to continue their college training 
throughout the summer. 

To assist Freshmen and Sophomores, a schedule of courses covering 
the summer, fall, winter, and spring terms is enclosed and requirements 
on the various associate degrees are enumerated. 

Students are urged to work out tentative programs covering a six 
quarter period which will include all requirements and electives. 

This program may be adjusted at the beginning of any quarter. 
Students mav enter at the beginning of anv quarter. 

I nder the speed-up program students will be completing work at 
the Junior College in August. December, March, and June: but only 
one commencement will be held each \ear. the latter part of May 
or early June. 

Requirements for Admission 

\I> MISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior College must be 
a graduate of an accredited high school with sixteen units of credit. 

2. A general average of all high school work amounting to five points 
above the passing grade, when figures are used, or one step above 
passing when letters are used, will be required. 

3. The following specific requirements must also be met: 

A. Eight constants — 3 units in English. 2 units in social studies, 
2 units in mathematics ( 1 must be in algebra and 1 should be 
in plane geometry l . and 1 unit in science. 



n ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

B. Eight electives I <>f these electives must be from the follow- 
ing subjects: English, so< ial studies, mathematics, science, and 
foreign language. Four units ma) be from tli<- vocational and 

,i\ ni ;iti<»n;il groups. 
\!>\llssl<>\ \\\ \\ \MI\ \ I |(t\ 

Students who do not meet the above requirements for admission l>\ 
certificate ma) take entrance examinations prescribed b) the College. 
A fee of two dollars is charged for each examination taken. Entrance 
examinations must be completed at least one week before registration. 
Additional information may be secured from the Registrar. 

Fees and Refunds 

Fees will be charged according to the student load in quarter hours. 
A normal load is 16 to 17 quarter hours each term or quarter. 

5 quarter hours - - $15.00 

10 quarter hours - - 25.00 

15-17 quarter hours - - 35.00 

A student who maintains a dean's list average will be permitted to 
take 20 quarter hours a term for 840.00. If for any reason other stu- 
dents are permitted to take 20 hours of work the charge will be $45.00. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pa\ a small fee 
for materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description 
of the courses found under "Courses of Instruction"" elsewhere in thi> 
bulletin. 

A late registration fee of $2.00 will be charged any students who 
fail to register and pay fees on the day designated for registration at 
the beginning of each quarter, unless excused because of sickne--. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirt\ days of a quarter will 
receive a refund of one-half of the registration fee. No refunds will 
be made after the first thirty days of a term, and no refunds will be 
made to those dismissed from the college. 



Courses Dropped and Transfers 

Special permission from the Registrar is necessary to drop a subject 
or to transfer from one subject to another. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA IS 

/• tplanation oj ( our it ( ic<(it 

\ course running five hours a week l<>i one quartei i ai i ies - quartei 
hours, <'i 3 I 3 semester hours, credit. One quartei hour credil is 
allowed For carli laboratory period. 

// ithdrawals 

\ formal withdrawal, presented in writing, is a prerequisite to hon- 
orable dismissal or re-entrance to this institution. \n\ studenl planning 

to withdraw should immediatel) make such intentions known to the 
administration of the school. 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-Register 

All students failing (except in cases excused before examinations on 
account of sickness) to pass at least one course other than physical 
education in an) one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. All students who fail to make an average of at least four honor 
points ( not more than one honor point will be counted in this reckon- 
ing for physical education I during the first three quarters' work at 
the Junior College will not be allowed to re-register. Withdrawal is 
recommended to all students with less than a "C" average at the end 
of the fourth quarter of college work, and at the end of the sixth quarter 
of college work a student must have an average of three-fourths an 
honor point per course in order to re-register. 

Reports and Grades 

Reports for every student will be sent to the parent or guardian at 
the end of every quarter. The reports are based upon the following 
system of marking: 

A plus (95-100) 4 honor points per course 

A (90-95) 3 honor points per course 

B (80-90) 2 honor points per course 

C (70-80) 1 honor point per course 

D (65-70) No honor points per course 

E (Incomplete) Minus one honor point per course 

F (Failure) Minus one honor point per course 



16 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

\n E (incomplete) ma) be removed 1>\ means stipulated 1>\ the in- 
Btructor <>f the course in which the student received the grade E. \n 
E doI removed in the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an F. 

In order t<» graduate, a Btudenl must receive as man) honor point-. 
based on tin- above grading system, as the number of courses required 



for graduation. 



Hi 



Student- who maintain an average of B or above in each course dur- 
ing a quarter's work will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic- Attain- 
ment List. 

The 20 ' i of ill advanced students and (2i students with less than 
six quarters" work who have the highest averages, provided this average 
is "B" or better, and have failed no courses, will have their names re- 
corded on a permanent Dean's List in a book for that purpose kept 
in the office of the President. 

Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction! will be bestowed upon 
those receiving an average of 3 honor points per course. 

A valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class from among 
the five students with the highest scholastic average in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Absences 

If a student finds it necessary to be absent from class more than 
three times he should present a satisfactory explanation of each addi- 
tional absence to his instructor. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 

A student must maintain an average of "C" to graduate. 

Ouarter 

LIBER \l \KTS Houw 
Biology 1-2 or 

Biology 11-12 I Human Biolog) I 10 

Economics 21 I Introductory i 5 

English 11-12 I Freshman l lit 

English 23-24 i Literature i or 

\\..,ld Literature 1-2 10 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 17 

( (ii.ut.i 
Houn 

Foreign Language H> 

History 2-3 oi 

History U42 LO 

Mathematics 1 I Introductory I or 

Mathematics 2 (College Ugebra) 5 

Ten hours from follow biff: 



sical Science 11-12 



Economics 22 

Sociology 60 

Laboratory Sciences 

Foreign Language 10 

Library Science and Orientation 2 

Physical Education 1-2* 8 

Elective* 20 



Total 100 

HOME ECONOMICS 
Biology 1-2 or 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology) 10 

Chemistry 1-2 (Inorganic) 10 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 or World Literature 1-2 10 

Twenty-five hours from following: 

Art 11 

Chemistry 5 (Organic) 

Home Economics 1 ( Clothing ) 

Home Economics 2-3 (Foods) 

Home Economics 5 ( Home Furnishing ) 

Home Economics 6 ( Nutrition ) 25 

History 2-3 or 41-42 10 

Library Science and Orientation 2 

Mathematics 1 5 

Sociology 60 5 

Physical Education 1-2* 8 

Electives 5 

Total 100 



18 \ R \I - TRO \<; I l N I OR COLLEGE 

( fuartei 

I l\ \\< I \M> < OMM1 R< I Bonn 

Biolog) Ll-12 (Human Biology) 10 

I W ent) -fi\ e li<>in - 1 1 om follow Log : 

Commerce 2, 3, 1 I Accounting I 

7 i Monej an<l Banking I 

lo i Insurance) I 1 (Statistics) 25 

Economics 2 1 i Introductory I and 

22 I \\ orld Resources) 10 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 I Literature! or 

World Lite ratun- 1-2 10 

Histor) 2-3 or 11-12 10 

Librai \ Science and Orientation 2 

Mathematics 1 (Introductory) or 

Mathematics 2 ( College Algebra I 5 

Physical Education 1-2* 8 

Electives 10 

Total 100 

*An academic course of five quarter hours may be substituted for physical educa- 
tion by students who are working in the afternoons. 

Suggestions to Students in Regard to Courses 

In general, students who expect to continue their college work toward 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of Science. Bachelor of Com- 
merce, etc.. will take the Liberal Arts course at Armstrong Junior Col- 
lege. Students are urged to consult the catalog of the senior college or 
university which they expect to attend and plan their courses at Ann- 
strong accordingly. 

It is recommended that engineering students take only one year at 
Armstrong which will include two or three courses in chemistry, three 
courses in mathematics beginning with college algebra, and the remain- 
ing courses in freshman requirements. 

Pre-medical students are advised to schedule all their electives (20 
hours i as well as the last group requirements of 10 hours in the lab- 
orator) sciences (biology, chemistry, physics) in order that they may 
be able to complete requirements for admission to medical school within 
one year after graduation from Armstrong. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 19 

Program foi Student Vursea 

Armstrong Junior College, in cooperation with the Candler Hospital, 
i ilti- the Following program For student nurses: 

Horn - 

. (.1 RSI ( .-In 

\iKitom\ In and Physiolog) In 6 

English In 3 

iolog) 61n 3 

Microbiology In 3 

Chemistx) L3n 4 

'Nursing In 1 

Nursing 2n and 3n 

Nursing \rt> In 4 

Psychology In 3 

Home Economics 2n 3 

*Homr Economics 5n 2 

* Physical Education In 1 

•Physical Education 2n 1 



Total 34 

•Courses given by Candler Hospital. 






20 \ R M STRO \ <, ji \ | o h COLLEC E 

COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR NURSES COURSES 

lmitom\ In Two lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour Laboratory period. The course runs through two quarters, or may 
he conducted in one quarter, lee. $2.50 each quarter. 

Ill is course i> conducted concurrently with the course in physiology, 

thus integrating the subject matter. The course includes both gross and 
microscopical anatomy. Lectures, demonstrations and some dissection. 

Physiology 1" — This course is conducted concurrent!) with the course 
in anatomy. In the integration of the two courses, a basic understanding 
of the functions of the normal human body is presented so as to enable 
the student better to understand health, nutrition, and the pathological 
changes due to disease. The blood group of each student is ascertained 
and recorded. The methods of instruction are the same as in anatomy. 

Microbiology In — Two lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee, $2.00. 

The title "microbiology" is used because it is that branch of biology 
that deals with plant and animal forms, while bacteriology includes 
only the micro-organisms of vegetable origin. The characteristics and 
activities of micro-organisms and their relation to health and disease 
are studied; also the sources, modes, and prevention of infection and 
isolation; disinfection and asepsis; tissue changes in the healing process, 
infections and neoplasms. Explorations of scientists in the field of 
microbiology and new discoveries applicable to health conservation are 
noted. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and laboratory work. 

Chemistry 13n — Three lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee, $2.50. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the principles 
of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with special applica- 
tions to nursing practice. General composition of blood and urine is 
studied: the students volunteering to eat certain diets which show rela- 
tionship of utilization of foods, and kidne\ function through urinalysis. 

Sociology 61n — This course considers 1 1) the principles of sociology : 

(2 1 the nurse as a citizen of the community and as a professional 
worker: (3 I the importance of the hospital among the social agencies in 
the communit) : l4l the patient in the hospital coming from the family 
and returning to the family. Three hours. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 21 

Home Economics 2n Nutrition and Food Preparation, three hours. 

I he Fundamental principles of nutrition and food preparation are 
considered. The nutrition requirements oi children and of adult- are 
compared. Special attention is iz i \ « * r 1 to the nutrition requirements of 
childhood and pregnane) . 

Psychology In Three hours. This course is an introduction to t h< * 
stud\ of human behavior with emphasis on the underlying principles <»t 

mental adjustments. The importance of the nurse's own personalty i- 

stressed. 

English In \ basic course in the fundamentals of reading, writing, 
and speaking knplish. 




ARMSTRONG I I N I OR COLLEGE 

COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Art 

/// //. /// Principles <md Design, Two lectures and eight hours 
laboratory work each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

A stud) of the prim iplo of art a- -ecu in familiar works <»f art and 
as applied in problems oi everyda) lif*-. Laboratory periods involve 
illustration of art principles, textile design, and costume design. 

Biologi 

Biology 1-2. Principles of Animal Biology. Three hours lecture and 
five hours laboratory a week for two quarters. Laboratory fee. I 
each quarter. 

An introductory course dealing w ith the fundamental facts of Animal 
Biologx . Lectures, combined with laboratory studies of representative 
animal types, give the student accurate conceptions of the processes of 
Living things, nutrition, growth, reproduction, heredity and evolution. 
a- well as training in accuracy of interpretation of structure and thor- 
oughness in dissection. 

Biology 3. Invertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite Biology 1-2. Three 
hours lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Labora- 

to,\ fee. $3.00. 

An intensive study of invertebrate animals and their relationships, 
with special emphasis on local fresh-water and marine forms. 

Biology 4. Vertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite Biology 1-2. Three hours 
lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Laboratory 
fee. S3.00. 

An intensive study of the vertebrate group including laboratory dis- 
section of several types. The study includes the kinds of vertebrates 
and their distribution, vertebrate embryology, and details of the various 
vertebrate organ systems. 

Biology 11-12. Human Biology. Five hours a week for two quarters. 
Materials fee. SI. 00. 

A non-laboratory survey course in the principles of living things. 
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the 
general biological principles, particularly as applied to the human or- 
ganism. The first half of the course includes a study of the fundamental 
facts of biology, human anatomy and physiology. The second half of 



01 SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

tht- course includes studies in problems ol public health, reproduction, 
genetics, »• \ olul ion and eugenics. 

*Biolog) 21. Laboratory Technic. Prerequisites l>i<>l<>u\ 1-2. Three 
hours lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Lab* 
orator] Fee, 13.00. 

\ course in methods of preparing microscope slides, preservation 

of tissues, and blood analysis. Methods of preparing tissues staining, 
mounting, blood counting, blood typing and introductory work in 

clinical and laboratory chemistrj arc practiced. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 1-2. Crucial Chemistry. Four hours of class room work 
and five hours laboratory a week for two quarters. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Deposit, $2.50. 

This is an introductory course designed to meet the needs of students 
who are interested in medicine, engineering, and other sciences. In 
general, the students will study the preparation, properties and uses 
of a number of non-metallic and metallic elements and their compounds. 
The fundamental laws of elementary inorganic chemistry are stressed. 
The laboratory work offers several experiments which serve as an intro- 
duction to Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 

Chemistry 3. Qualitative Analysis. Prerequisite Chemistry 1-2 or the 
equivalent. Four hours class room work and six hours laboratory a 
week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Deposit, $5.00. 

The lectures deal with the theoretical aspects of the subject with 
special reference to the application of the Law of Mass Action. The 
laboratory work will consist of a study of the reactions, precipitations 
and detections of the principal metals and acid radicals. 

Chemistry 4. Quantitative Analysis. Prerequisite Chemistry 1-2. Two 
hours lecture and nine hours laboratory work a week for one quarter. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Deposit, $5.00. 

A course designed to meet the needs of pre-medical students and 
others who wish an introduction to the subject. The class work is con- 
cerned w ith theory, procedure, and problems. The laboratory exercises 
involve both volumetric and gravimetric determinations. 



Not offered 1944-45. 



24 armstrong junior college 

Commerce 

Commerce 51. Beginning Typing. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
(Two quarter hours credit.) Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

This course consists <>f introductory instruction in the technical fea- 
tures and care of the machine, position, fingering, propel tone}), and 

master) of the keyboard. \n average speed of thirty words a minute 
is attained. 

Commerce 52. Intermediate Typing. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. (Two quarter hours credit. I Prerequisite Commerce 51 or equiva- 
lent. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

Special emphasis is placed on business letters, carbon copies, manu- 
script typing, rough drafts. legal documents and tabulations. An aver- 
age speed of fort) words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 53. Advanced Typing. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
(Two quarter hours credit. I Prerequisite Commerce 51-52 or equiva- 
lent. This course offers the student special opportunity to perfect his 
typing technique. Special emphasis is given to speed building and 
practical application. 

Commerce 61. Beginning Shorthand. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. (Three quarter hours credit.) Theory of Gregg Shorthand. 

Commerce 62. Intermediate Shorthand. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. ( Three quarter hours credit. I Prerequisite Commerce 61 or 
equivalent. 

Continuation of theory of shorthand and beginning dictation. 

Commerce 63. Advanced Shorthand. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. (Three quarter hours credit. I Prerequisite Commerce 61-62 or 
equivalent. 

Dictation and Transcription. Student is required to take dictation at 
the rate of eighty words a minute. 

Commerce 64. Secretarial Practice. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Laborator) fee, $3.50. 

This course stresses office procedure, duplicating, filing, clerical and 
secretarial problems. The student becomes familiar with all types of 
business document-. 



OF SA^ \ N n \ ll . G EO RG1 \ 

(The follow ing courses are not offered I'M I- IS • : 
Commerce 2-3, Introductory iccounting. Three hours lectures and 
four hours laboratory a week for two quarters, 

Commerce i. iccounting Problems. Three lectures and four hours 
laboratory a week. 

Comment- 5. Marketing. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Commerce 7. Mono and Banking. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
( ommerce 10. Insurance. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce I I. Elements of Statistics. Prerequisite Mathematics 1. 

Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce 31-32. Field H ork. Fifteen hours per week for two quar- 
ters. Ten quarter hours credit. 

Economics 

Economics 21. Introduction to Economic Theory and Problems. Five 
hours a week for one quarter. 

This course presents a survey of economic thought of the past and 
present, makes an analysis of the economic institutions of today and 
examines some of the major economic problems in the modern world. 

* Economics 22. World Resources. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

English 

English 11-12. A Double Course for Freshmen. Five hours a week 
for two quarters. 

The first half of the course is devoted to a review of punctuation and 
the fundamentals of grammar, theme writing and vocabulary building. 
The second half of the course continues written composition and intro- 
duces the student to various types of literature. Throughout the course 
the student is asked to make reports on novels and biographies read 
out of class and to write term papers dealing with some phase of the 
material covered during each quarter. 

World Literature 1-2 (Formerly Humanities 1-2). A Double Course 
for Sophomores. Five hours a week for two quarters. 



Not offered 1944-45. 



ARMSTRONG J I MOR COLLEGE 

\ general survej of tin- leading intellectual and esthetic movements 
<.f historic times, with particular emphasis on tin- cultural achievements 
«>f tin- West. Selections are read from the work- of the greatesl Literary 
figures ti nin I [omer to ( Iheckoi . 

* English I. An Introduction to Poetry, Elective. Ii\<- hours a week 
for "in- quai tei . 

\ Btud) of the various types and forms <»f poetT) with particular 

emphasis on the works of the more recent British and American poets. 

English 13. Advanced Composition. Elective. Five hours a w<-ek 
for one quarter. 

Advanced writing practice. The course is largely designed to help 
the student express his ideas in clear, well-organized and interesting 
prose. \ arious techniques of composition are considered, hut the main 
portion of the course is devoted to the writing and re-writing oi straight- 
forward exposition. 

English 23. Early English Literature. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A survey of the leading movements and authors of English literature 
From Beowulf to the Romantic Period. 

English 24. Recent English Literature. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A continuation of English 23; a survey of the leading movements 
and authors of English Literature from the Romantic Period to the 
present. 

English 25. American Literature. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A surve) of American literature including a study of the works of 
the leading figures with particular emphasis on more recent authors. 

I i;i \< ii 

French /-_'. Elementary French. Five hours a week for two quarters. 

\ course t«>r beginners. Grammar, oral and written practice, early 
reading o\ selected material in French. In the second quarter, the read- 
me objective will be emphasized along with continued practice in con- 
\ ei sation and composition. 



( offered in alternate n eai s. 



01 SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

French >. Intermediate French. Five hours a week foi one quarter. 
\ course in review grammar. Oral and written practice; reading oi 
selected texts, 

French 7. Introduction to Literature. I i\<- hours a week for one 
quarter. 

\ surve) course with particular emphasis <>n the nineteenth century. 
\\ ritten and oral reports on collateral readings. 

French 8. French Classical Drama. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Selected plays of Corneille, IVIoliere and Racine are studied. Four 
plays arc read in class and four plays read as collateral. 

French 9. French Short Stories. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
\ stud) of the short story in France with varied reading and dis- 
cussion of selected authors. 

HlSTORY 

History 2-3. American and European History Since the American 
Revolution. Five hours a week for two quarters. 

These two courses provide a parallel study of the major political 
social and economic developments which have taken place in the United 
Slates since the establishment of their independence and in Europe 
since the outbreak of the French Revolution. Attention is concentrated 
on the foundation of American political institutions, the growth of 
American democracy and the emergence of the United States as a great 
industrial world power. With respect to Europe, the fundamental factors 
in modern European civilization are examined: industrial revolution, 
nationalism, democracy, socialism and the world conflicts which have 
resulted from these developments. 

History 2-3 are required of all students and may be taken separately. 
History 5. English History. General Course. Five hours a week for 
one quarter. 

A study of English political and social institutions from early times 
to the present with special emphasis given to developments since the 
Tudor period. 

History 6. Latin America. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
This course deals with the colonial, revolutionary and recent develop- 
ments in the countries of Hispanic America. 



28 \l!M^TIi(iM. Jl MOR COLLEGE 

History //-/-'. Comparative American History, 1 i\»- hour- a week 

for tw«» quartei b. 

\ stud) of the cultural, economic and diplomatic relationships <»f the 
I uitcd States to the rest of the world during tin- last one hundred and 
fift\ years, with attention concentrated on its role in the present conflict 

Coi RSES in So< I M. S< ll \< I - 

Social Science /. Contemporary Georgia. Five hours a wc j k for one 
quarter. 

The purpose of this course i> to familiarize the student with the 
problems of the state of Georgia and to make him more aware of its 
government, economic, social and cultural activities. 

(Contemporary Georgia is required for graduation from the I ni- 

versity of Georgia. I 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 7. Clothing. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. 

This course is designed to establish appreciations, interests, habits, 
and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, design, construction, and 
care of clothing. Problems are provided so that students gain exper- 
Ience in application of these principles. A study of good grooming 
habits is included. 

Home Economics 2. Eoods. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. $5.00. 

\ study of the basic facts underlying food selection and preparation. 
The laboratory periods provide opportunity for practical experience 
in cooker\ . 

Home Economics 3. Eoods. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. 15.00. 

\ continuation of the study in foods including different types oi 

dishes used for specific purposes, food selection, meal planning, and 
table service. Students gain actual experience in all forms of family 
entertaining such as famih meals, buffet, teas, receptions, etc. 

Home Economics 5. Home Planning and Furnishing. Four lectures 
and one laboratory period each week for one quarter. 



o I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

\ stud) <-t planning and furnishing tli<- bome from the standpoint 
of famil] need-: modern tendencies in Ih'ii-in- and application of prhv 
ciples of art to home furnishing; a short histor] oi architecture and 
furniture; stud] of furnishing various rooms emphasizing heating, 
lighting, and treatment of walls, Boors, window-, togethei with selection 
and arrangement <d furnishings. 

Home Economics 6". Nutrition. Five hours a week foi one quarter. 
\ stud] of nutritive requirements <»f individuals and famil) groups; 
relative costs of foods; dietary calculations. Emphasis is placed on 
nutritive properties of foods, and on the requirements for energy, 

proteins, mineral elements and vitamins. 

Librari Science and Orientation 

\n orientation course, required of all freshmen, is offered in the 
tall quarter of each year. This course, which includes instruction in 
lihrary methods, practice in remedial reading, and aid in the develop- 
ment of effective study habits, is given under the supervision of various 
faculty members. Two hours a week for one quarter. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 1. Freshman Mathematics. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A beginning course in algebra, statistics, finance, and trigonometry. 

Mathematics 2. College Algebra. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

This course begins with a review of factoring, fractions, exponents 
and radicals, linear and quadratic equations, and includes a studv of 
progressions, the binominal theorem, and theory of equations. 

Mathematics 3. Trigonometry. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle, the 
general solutions of trigonometric equations, and polar coordinates. 

Mathematics 4. Analytic Geometry. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. Prerequisite Mathematics 3. 

This course includes the analytic geometry of point, line and circle, 
conic sections, transformation of coordinates, polar and rectangular 
graphs, and parametric equations. 

Mathematics 8. Spherical Trigonometry and Mathematics of A rial ion. 
Five hours a week for one quarter. Prerequisite Plane Trigonometrv. 



.10 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

This course is designed to give tin- Btudenl Bome of the practical 
aspects of spherical trigonometry as applied t<> navigation and aviation. 
Meteorology 

Meteorology I. Introductory Meteorology. Five hours lecture a week 
for one quarter. 

\n introductory course in tlie elements of the weather, including 
practical work with weather instrument-, reading and preparation of 
weather maps, and the development of an understanding of the prob- 
lem- involved in weather analysis. 

Phi si< \l Education 

Each student is required to take three hours of physical education a 
week throughout the year. The following program is provided: 

During the Fall and Winter Quarters emphasis is placed on basket- 
hall, calisthenics, games, relays, posture and corrective exercises. 

During the Spring the program includes Softball, swimming and 
tennis. 

Physics 

Physical Science 11-12. A Survey of the Physical Sciences. Five 
hours lecture a week for two quarters. 

A two-quarter course covering the general principles of the phvsical 
sciences. The first quarter is a survey of physics and astronomy : the 
second quarter covers chemistry, geography, geology, palaeontologx . 

Physics 21. Mechanics. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory 
work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. S2.50 per quarter. 
Deposit, $2.50. 

A course dealing with the fundamental laws of mechanics. Emphasis 
is placed upon the solution of problems. 

Physics 22. Heat. Li^lit and Sound. Four hours lecture, two hours 
laboratory work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. $2.50 per 
quarter. Deposit. $2.50. 

A stud) of wave motion and sound, heat, and light. 

Physics 23. Electricity. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory 
work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. $2.50 per quarter. 
Deposit. $2.50. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA U 

This course deals primarily with the principles ol electricity and 
magnetism. Some of the newer concepts in tin- field «.l electronics, 
radiation, and atomic structure are also included. 

Pol i ri< M S MI\M 

Political Science 12. National Government oj the United States. 
Five hours s week for one quarter. 

Political Science 13. State <m<l Local Government. Five hours a 
week for one quarter. 

I'm ( HOLOG1 

Psychology 31. Introductory Psychology. Five hours lecture a week 
for one quarter. 

\n introductory lecture course in psychology, including discussions 
<>f learning, memory, behavior, psycho-biological relationships, morale. 
and motivation. 

Psychology 32. Applied Psychology. Five hours lecture a week for 
one quarter. 

A course in the applications of psychological principles in everyday 
life. Work includes personality and its improvement, public speaking, 
salesmanship, advertising, child psychology, psychology of music and 
art. personnel management, and other phases. 

Psychology 33. Social Psychology. 5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course is an introduction to the psychology of groups. An analysis 
is made of the physiological and the socio-cultural motivation of the in- 
dividual from infancy to adulthood from the standpoint of his group 
relationships. Special attention is given to a study of leadership, the 
development of radical and conservative qualities, propaganda, war. 
fascism, communism, delinquency and public opinion. 

Sociology 

Sociology 60. Marriage and the Family. Five hours each week for 
one quarter. 

A study of family backgrounds, preparation for marriage, marriage 
interaction and family administration, family economics, problems of 
parenthood, family disorganization. A study of the family in war time 
and present day trends in family life is included. 



32 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Spanish 

Spanish l-~. Elementary Spanish. Fivchourea week for two quarters. 
These courses are for the purpose <>f providing the student with the 
elements of Spanish bj reading, composition and speaking. 

Spanish 3. Intermediate Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Grammar review, composition and selected prose readings. 
Spanish I. idvanced Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

The purpose <>f this course is to increase the student's facilit\ in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish litera- 
ture are read. 

Spanish 5. Commercial Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of business letters and forms used hy the Spanish-speaking 
world and of the vocabulary of trade, travel and communication. 

Spanish 6. Modern Prose Readings. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

This course provides intensive reading of novels, plays and short 
stories of Nineteenth and Twentieth century Spanish and Latin-Ameri- 
can authors. 






OF S A \ A N N A II , G K O R GI A 



33 



OFFICERS OF Ml MM \ssnci VI ION 

Herbert S. Traub, Jh President 

Miss Marei IImmkin Vice-President 

Miss Celesti Norms Secretary 'Treasure) 



(,\\ VDUATES OF 1943 
Associate in Liberal Arts 



Louise Mexandei 

DoroUrj Bennett 

\\ Lnirred Carobel Brown 

Dena ( lohen 

\ irginia ( lornell 

Ida Frances ( lottingham 

Harriet Graham Da\ is 

Rosetta Pauline Davis 

Doroth) Jean I )el oach 

Robert W a\ oe Dillon 

.Iran \\ right Dukes 

\ irginia Edel 

Sarah Jo Goodin 

I orraine Kahn 

Aneta Myra Lasky 



Caroline Marshall 
Katherine Drane Morrell 

Pauline Celeste N « .iris 

Mai \ Powel Oppen 

Floyd I. ester Piehler 
iv<i\ James Rabb 

Delphina Roberts 

Mary Ann Cooper Suddath 
Sara Pe> ton Sullivan 
Austin Samuel Wade 
Marguerite Huntingdon Warner 
Rebecca Jane Webster 
Rosalyn Weiser 
Mary Leila Wheeler 
Francis Kenneth Wolfe, Jr. 



Associate in Home Economics 



Mar\ Lou Elliott 
Janie Mary Goolsby 
Martha Gloria Kicklighter 



Margaret Ellen McDermott 
Bobbie Stephenson 
Henrietta Dola Wolfe 



Associate in Finance and Commerce 



Rosa Jane Smith 



Sue Elizabeth Tatum 



STUDENTS ATTENDING ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

1943-1944 

Summer Session 1943 



Anestos, Harry 

Brown, Jennie Bass 

Brunson, Julanie 

Burroughs, Cecil 

Cobb, Carswell H. 

Cooke, Mrs. Frances C. 

Cowan, Martha 

Coyle, Catherine Elizabeth 

Cronin, James J. 

Edel, Virginia 

Forbes, Mrs. S. C. 

Foshee, Elizabeth 

Gray, Clare 

Hancock, Roy 

Hardee, W. L. 

Harty, Joan 

Helmly, Thomas 



Houser, Andrea 
Hubert, Elizabeth 
Isley, George H., Jr. 
Kanter, Harriet 
Keller, Katherine 
Kessler, Fred 
King, Lynwood B., Jr. 
Lufburrow, Albert 
Lyons, Marie 
Marcus, Gertrude 
Martin, Jane 
McDermott, Margaret 
Meddin, Audrey 
Melaver, Norton 
Metzger, William 
Murphy, Mary 
Newton, Thomas Jackson 



34 



\ II M >TI{(l \(, Jl MOK COL LEG E 



O'Brien, Moreen 
( tppen, Mai j 
O'Shea, Y \. 
Paderewsky, Helen 
Parker, Mi-. I aura M. 
Perry, Van 
Richardson, Thomas 
Rountree, I- red 
Schv it/, [sadore J. 
Silverman, llarr> 
Smith, Carol] a 
Smith, Marguerite 
Smith, Thomas 



Sprague, [sabel 
Stewart, Mariann 
Swint, Ceraldine 
Taj lor, Mi-. Louise 
Thorpe, Kathleen 
Turner, Marj 
\ annerson, Jessie* 
\\ sites, Janie 
Walker, Marvine 
William-. Margaretl 
\\ ilson, Eugene 
Wolfe, Helen* 



M. 



'Students whose name- are Btarred an- on the permanent Dean's f.i-t. 



STUDENT BODY 1943-44 



Bailey, Ansel 
Bak, Benjamin 
Bak, Mr-. Muriel 
Baker, I ilia ( llaire 
Barclay, Walter T. 
Belsinger, Esther R. 
Bennett, E. L. 
Bennett. Ruthel 
Black, Lisette* 
Blackwell, Lucy Elizabeth 
Blair, Estelle 
Blowe, Lillian 
Boyd, Gretchen 
Brewer, Cornelia 
Brooks, Gloria 
Branson, Julanie* 
Brushwood, Lenora 
Burpitt, Daisy 
Burton, Ray Lucille 
Butler, Betty 
Byrd, Laura 
Capitan, Marina 
Carellas, Pauline 
Chaskin, Mrs. Al 
Cheatham, Frank, Jr. 
Cleverdon, Frances 
Cobb, Carswell H.* 
Cobb, Lindsey 
Cone, Anna* 
Cowan, Martha 
Coyle, Catherine Elizabeth 
Credit-. Kenneth L. 
Cronin, James J. 
Culbertson, Beverly* 
I lanklefs, \ irginia 
I). -an. Marj Lee 
Denny, Elizabeth 
Dismer, W illiam* 
Doolan, \\ illiam 
Douglas, Mrs. W. W. 
I )<>\ If. Fred A. 
Dunn. Laurence M. 



Durrence, Bettye 
Edwards, Mr-. Marj \nn 

Elliott, Nanc> 

Engel, John T. 
Epps, Vrabelte 

Ferrelle. Edna 
Fessopulos, Ethel* 
Fetner, Kathryn 
Peuger, Loretta 
Foshee, Elizabeth 
\'<>\. Mary 
French, Carol 
Fuller. Mr-. Georgia S. 
Garis, Trent 
Gilbert, F. M. 
Gold, Gwendolyn 
Grant, Mrs. Mar\ K. 
Griner, Benjamin 
Griner, Bettv 
Gruber, A. M. 
Gruber, Norma H. 
Guest, Charlotte 
Hardee. W. I . 
Hardin-:. Margie 
Hardy, Elizabeth 
Hart, Dorris 
Helmly. Thomas 
Henderson, Loui-<- 
Henry, Mrs. Jeanne S. 
rlerrington, Marian Nan 
I le\ man. ( Catherine 
Higgs, Marian 
Higgs, Mavis 

Hitt. Bettv 

Holt. Marguerite* 
Hoyle, \nn 
Hubert. Elizabeth 
1 1\ mes, ( lomer 
Jarrett, Elizabeth 
Javo, George Nf. 
J aw Mirk. Selma 
Johnson. Shirley 






o I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



35 



Johnson, W yatl 
Jones, Helen 
J. .He-. Pauline 
Kaplan, Josephine 
Kaufmann, Louise 
Kelley, Katherine 
Kelly, Man Uice 
K<\ . Mai \ I ouise 
Kicklighter, Henrietta 4 
Kleinsteuber, Bettj 
I ain, Eugenia 
I amar, Howard 
I amas, Fifi 
I awing, Mrs. K. K. 
I r\ ine, W illiam I.. 
Levington, Helen 

I iiinpkin. Patricia 

I yons, Marie* 

Mallard. Jean 

Marcus, Gertrude 
Martin, Jane* 
Matthews, Mice 
Mc( llellan, Carol} n 

McMillan. Man' 
Melaver, Norton* 
Merriman, J. A. 
Merritt, DeWitt 

Miller, Susan 
Mixter, Henry F. 
Mixter, Mrs. Henry F. 
Monsees, Catherine 
Montgomery, Meegan* 
Mooring, Robert 
Morris, Mary Winifred 
Movsovitz, Leona 
Murphy, Mary 
Neel, Mardette* 
Nelson, Marian 
New ton, Benny Jane 
Nicholson, Joanne 
Palin, Mary Lill'a 
Peek, Stanley 
Penn, Eloise 
Perkins, Doris 
Persse, Margaret" 
Pilcher, Ennis 
Pinckney, Elizabeth 
Pittman, Mildred 
Poindexter, June" 
Powell, Oscar S. 
Powers, Eleanore 
Purvis. Willie Kate* 



Rabun, Kathi j n 
Ratner, I Efa rnard 
R i( hard son, I homafl 
Risher, Elizabeth 
Roane, ( !url iss 
Roffman, Gloria 
Rosenthal, Charlotte 
Rosenzweig, Sanford 
Russell, Mrs. James M. 
I!\ an, Mai jorie 
Salas, Helen 
Salas, Mrs. Lottie 
Saner, Grace 
Saxon, Susan 
Schmalheiser, Helen 
Schwalbe, Herman 
Scott. Doroth) 
Scoville, Rose 
Seabrook, Mar) 
Seedlock, Mrs. Robert 
Shaw, Horace William 
Shearouse, Alice 
Smith, Marguerite 
Steinheimer, Henrietta 
Storer, Marguerite* 
Strickland, George 
Sullivan, George 
Suiter, Elizabeth 
Sussman, Vivian 
Swint, Geraldine 
Tarbell, Richard G. 
Thompson, Eugene C. 
Thorpe, Sarah Maude 
Turner, Mrs. J. A. 
Upton, Ann Nash 
Varn, Rose 
Waites, Janie 
Waldman, Mrs. B. 
Walker, H. Ashton 
Webb, Emily 
Whittle, George Patterson 
Wilkes, Kathleen 
Williams, Fanny S. 
Williams, Mrs. George B. 
Williams, Margarett* 
Wills, Miriam 
Wills, Reba 
Woodward, Helen E. 
\\ oodward, Sybil 
Wortsman, Elise 
Yarbrough, Anne 



V, 



\ R M S T R NG JI'MOR CO L I. F G E 



STl DIM M RSES 



Udridge, < rwendoh " 
( lappa, Billie Kathi j n 
< latter, Esther 
Chapman, Helen 
Collins, Merial 
Easterling, \nn 
Evans, \ irginis 
Grotheer, Vngelene 
Hill, Renie 
Hughes, Martha 
Knowles, Mary 
Martin. Patricia 
Martin. Virginia 



Mock, Lorene 
Outlaw. Evelyn 
Poplin, innie Kuth 

l\a\ mi. ihI. Hutli 

Roach, Mildred 

Roane, Flora 
Roddenberry, Man 
Schneider, Bettye 
Shines, Grace 
Smith, .Miriam 
\\ arbington, Bobbie 

\\ inter. Shirley 
Tuten, Gloria 



Anne 



ARMSTRONG J I NIOR COLLEGE 

Faculty Members and Former Faculty Members 
in the Armed Services 

ARM\ 

Kenneth J. Duffy 
Arthur M. Gignilliat 
Arthur T. Kolgaklis 

NA\ \ 

Joseph Thomas Askew 

William Minor Dabnev 

Robert M. Strahl 

MARINES 

Charles B. Kestler 

MERCHANT MARINE 
Ernest W. Braithwaite 

Armstrong Junior College Alumni 
in the Armed Services 



ARMY 



Louis Alexander 
Charles H. Baggs 
Robert Edwin Baggs 
David Barnett 
Frank Barragan. Jr. 
Edward H. Bennett 
Edward C. Bercegeay 
Joseph Berg 
Will Bon, I 
Julian Mair Bono 
1 1. I Jewell) n Bowyer, Jr. 
\\ . Morehouse Bowyer 
Vernon C. Bragg 
Sidney Lee Brew in. Jr. 
F.arl ( Ihestei Brushwood 



Decatur Campbell 
( iarswell ( !obh 

A. J. Cohen. Jr. 
Sheftall Coleman, Jr. 
James Collins 
Thomas E. Cone 
Vlfred Conway 
( herald Cook 
\\ alter ( ioolidge 
Max Cooper 
Arthur Cranman 
George R. Cronemiller 
Jack H. Cronk 
James Walter Curlee 
James \. Davenport 



(» I 



\ \ \ \ \ \ II . (.1 ORG 1 \ 






Robert I . Davis 
rheodore Deffnei 

i \. Del -.!■ li 
Robert <> Del oach 
Robert Wayne Dillon 
Jack Dinerraan 
Ml. n II. Douglas 
Barclay I . Douglas, Jr, 
John II. DuBois 
Joseph DuBois 
Cuion F. Downing 
Daniel Duke 
John I arsen DuPonl 
I < \ Durham 
David R. Elmbre 
II. Viulrrw Ernst 
I [arvej Perrelle, Jr. 
Robert F. FinCh 

Raymond I'iimtN 

Theodore B. Fitzsimona, Jr. 
Thomas Flythe 

Mulreu \. Fountain. Jr. 
Michael K. Gannam 
Frank R. Gardner 
John (_.'. Gardner 
Joseph Genone 
I ,ouis M. ( livens 
William Glass 
Arthur P. Gnann, Jr. 
Harold B. Goldberg 
Joseph Goldberg 
Harvey Gordon 
Robert Gordon 
Paul E. Graham 
\\ illiam Graham 
Eugene W. Griner 
( lharles W. Groover 
Morton \ . I [aas 
Howard llarl Hansen 
Howell R. Hanson, Jr. 
\\ endell llardwiek 
Jack Hardy 
Richard Hard} 
Gordon L. Hart 
.Maurice Hartnett 
William Hearn 
Norman Barton Heflin 
Gilbert M. Helmken 
Lindsey P. Henderson 
John C. Hollingsworth 
Robert W. Horn 
Paul P. Hussey 
Monroe Hut to 
Milton L. Hymes, Jr. 
Jonathan Hyrne 
Godfrey Hyrne 
Richard S. Ihley 
Paul Innecken 
Richard C. Jackson 
\rthur I. Jeffords 



Joseph M. Jenkins 
Howard < . [ewett, Jr. 

Will,..,,, \\. fordan 
Manx Kaufmann 
I >.u i iel ( .. K 1 1 . hens, Jr. 
\iilim J. K lingon, .h. 
\ rheodore Kolgaklis 
( lharles \. Laffitteau 
\ 1 la n s. Laird 
\l«\ 'I'. I angston, 1 1 . 
Joseph Heath Laughlin, .h 
\\ illiam Fred I ightsej 
Uva B. Lines 
William \1. Lloyd 
W alter Lowe 
Thomas .1. McGinn 
Francis I*. Mclntire 
Robert C. McLaughlin 
Frank II. McTeer 
Frank V. Maner 
\rtlnir Manning 
Samuel Marshal] 
Joseph Mendes 
( larol Minis 
Robert II. Mizell 
Edward II. Morgan 
( .coi iic ( llinton Morris 
Robert Muchmore 
James K. Murrin 
Robert Muse 
Hearing Nash 
James Byron Newton, Jr. 
\ incent Morris 
David Odrezin 
Horace E. Oplinger 
Alex Ormond 
Dan L. Patterson 
Richard 1). IVveler 
Arthur Phillips 
I Ian > I.. Picard 
Henry Pike 
Harvard S. Pitts 
Thomas M. Price. Jr. 
William J. Purcell 
Wilkie Rahi\ 
John F. Ranitz 
Henry S. Ray, Jr. 
James Russell Reddish 
Robert L. Redmond 
James M. Reed, Jr. 
Samuel A. Reed 
Frederick W. Reiser 
Carl Reitzel 
W illiam H. Rentz 
Jack 11. Rhodes 
Douglass Richard 
Robert Ricks 
Curtiss Roane 
Nathan A. Roane, Jr. 
Siegvart J. Robertson, Jr. 






\ R M STRONG J I \ I <) R < I I I «. 1 



Miller Rod( 

Man W . Rosolio 

John Nairn Rosa 
Saul Rubin 
Barney I . > a < 1 1 « - r 
Frank I'. Sanders 
>; mon Saul 

Alfred W . Schwanebeck 
< harlea \\ . >e\ le 
\\ illiain \\ . Snearouse 
Melvin Siegel 
Samuel II. Sikes 
( lharles I*. Simon 
Li. ii' - Fred Simpson 
\l\ ie Lee Smith 
James Mian Smith 
Henrj ( . Smith 
Leon Smithberg 
Maurice Smith! 
Philip Solomons 



Lawreni e Steinheimer, J t. 

( hven Stoughton 

John J. Sullivan 

\\ illiani F. Summerell 

I rederick Thigpen 

I -I tell Tuten 

John I). Tyre 

Jack Tyson 

(hath- \|. Waldrop 

Howell Walker 

James L W alia 

Thomas F. Walsh, Jr. 

Joseph Waters 

Joseph \\ hittle 

Jack W illiain- 

Robert Lee W illiam- 

James \ . W oodward 

Ruperl ( .. \\ oodward 

Robert W orsnop 

Richard \. ^ oung 



n m 



Robert Adams 
Fred ( Ihriss Mien 
Marvin Arkin 
Samuel Bailey 
Karl Bill-/ 
\\ illiain Bide/ 
Robert E. Blake 
Milton Bradley 
\\ oodrom W. Breland 
K. ( ourtenaj B> thewood 
James Madison Chandler 
William Cone 
Bertram Cooper 
Mar\ in Harris ( looper 
Joseph F. Craig 
Cordon W. Dasher 
Bennie Bryan Da\is. Jr. 
II. Francis DeCourl 
Samuel Dinerman 
Herschel Futral 
George Herbert Criffin 

ge II. Isley, Jr. 
I lam Lattimore 
John ( !. McCaulej 
Robert P. McCuen 



William 0. Miller 

Cameron Mixon 

Raymond Monsalvatge 

Coleman Mopper 

Hinckl) Murphy 

Thomas Jackson Newton 

Fenwick T. Nichols, Jr. 

Theodore Page 

George C. Patrick 

Louis Pfeiffer 

Roy Rahb 

Wilkie Rabey 

Robert Rainer 

William M. Reid. Jr. 

.Marion J. K i< <• 

Thomas Edmond Stevens, Jr. 

Thomas A. Stokes. Jr. 

.lame- Sullivan 

Champnej b Tunno 

MacDonell T\ re 

Au-tin S. \\ ade. Jr. 

Irving \ ictor 

William Earl Weatherly 

Marx Weil 

Kenneth \X olfe 



MXKINKS 



Edward Clyde Kicklighter 
John N. McLaughlin 



John Simpson 

Lawrence Wade Sinclair. Jr. 



MKH( II \\T M VRINE 

Bernard Vddy James Bentley 

Richard Braithwaite 



01 SAVANNAH. GEORC I A 






\\n\ii \ i\ 1 111 m i;\ u i 



Sara Henderson 
Martha I • <■ 
Joan Padgetl 
Elizabeth Pien e 
Marie Powers 
( laroh 11 W illiams 



< lonstancia s initli 
( elia 15. Steveni 
\lii iam Thomas 
Prani ea \ annei son 
Martha Mian \\ ilkinaon 
Man Marcarel W ilson 



\ll»l\(. I\ \(TI<)\ 



Arthur I". I>a\ 18 
W illiam ( '.. Guest, Jr. 
Mark Johnson 
Melvin Kil«-y 
Robert I). Lanier 
Homer Lauahlin 



\\ ai ren \\ ri^lii Lee 

William I?. Rice, Jr. 

\\ . \ erderj Roberts, Jr. 
John Dealing Schlej 
Olin J. Wimberh 



MSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



BULLETIN OF 

ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 
COLLEGE u 1945-1946 

A City Supported Junior College of Savannah, Georgia 




tf<2f 

310. OX 
A73S 
V IO 



Volume X K Number 1 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



•945-'94 6 



SIMMER — I ALL — WINTER — SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong Junior College 



A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




1 8339 



MEMBERSHIP IN 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



Volume X • Number 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



^r * 



"Education is a companion which no misfor- 
tune can depress — no crime destroy — no en- 
emy alienate — no despotism enslave. At home, 
a friend: abroad, an introduction ; in soli- 
tude, a solace; and in society, an ornament." 



* 




r 




ii 



" II 


[P 






I filial iiiiiiniii 1 


l I(At^v 


TxY^MSlfj 


mm 

j vV 1 J? 


\ / \l 1 ^ M 



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\RMSTRONG BUILDING 



I \ R \I S T RONG J I NIOR COLLEGE 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
L945-1946 

Summer Session 

Registration Monday, June 11 

Classes Begin Tuesday, June 12 

Examinations Friday, July 20 

Fall Quarter 

Freshman Registration Thursday, September 20 

Freshman Preliminary Tests Fri<la>. Saturday. September 21-22 

I pperclassman Registration Friday. September 21 

Classes Begin Monday, September 24 

Test Friday. October 19 

Test Wednesday, November 21 

Thanksgiving Holidays Thursday-Saturday. November 22-24 

Examinations Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday, December 17. 18. 19 

Homecoming Friday, December 21 

Christmas Holidays December 20-31 

Winter Quarter 

Registration Wednesday, January 2 

Classes Begin Thursday. January 3 

Test Friday. January 25 

Test Friday, February 22 

Examinations Monday-Wednesday, March 18-20 

Spring Quarter 

Registration Thursday. March 21 

( lasses Begin Friday. March 22 

Tesl Friday. April 12 

Open House Wednesday. April 17 

Examinations Wednesday-Friday, June 5-7 

President's Reception Friday, June 7 

Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon Saturday. June 8 

Graduation Exercises Monday. June 10 



OF. SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Hi k-< in i V. Jenkins Chairman 

Wimiwi VfuRPHEl Vice-Chairman 

Henri \l. Di \\. / \ Officio Herbert I.. Kayton 

( h.w F. I l LMER, I: ' \ Officio Gl n\ IH W . E. Nl< BOl SON 

Thomas Gamble, Ex Officio Mrs. Ji lian K. Qi ittlebai m 

James P, Hoi i.iiiw / \ Officio Ormond B, Strong, Eh Officio 

Fred \\ i ssels 

THE FACI LTV 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., M.S President 

Reuben \\ . Holland, A. 15.. \1.A Registrar and Treasurer 

\\ . Orson Beecher, A.B. and M.A., Emor) University; M.A.. I ni- 
versit) of Georgia 

Instructor in Romance Languages dud History, 
and Director of Institute of Citizenship. 
IElizabeth Ltnes Beecher, A.B.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in English. 

*Everett L. Bishop. Jr.. A.B. and M.S., Emory University; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa 

Instructor in Biology and Meteorology. 
'"'William M. DABNEY, A.B. and M.A., University of Virginia 
Instructor in History and Political Science. 

Eleanor Joyce Doyle. B.S., Immaculata College: M.A.. Catholic Uni- 
versit) of America 

Instructor in Spanish and Latin American History. 

Martha Bozeman Fay, B.S.. Rockford College; M.S., University of 
Illinois 

Instructor in Biology and Psychology. 

Mildred Gladys Feagin, B.S.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. 

Eleanor Mielke Fisk, A.B. and M.A.. University of Illinois 
Instructor in Social Science. 

Foreman M. Hawes. A.B.. Mercer University : M.S.. Emory University 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

REUBEN W. Holland. A.B. and M.A.. Emory University 
Instructor in Romance Languages. 



6 ARMSTRONG JUN1 OR COLLEG I 

Muriel Boyles McCai.e. A. 15.. Florida Mate College for Women 

Instructor in English and Spanish. 
Harri I'. Miller, B.S. in Cli.K.. I niversit) <»| North Carolina: Grad- 
uate Study, I niversit) of North Carolina 
Instructor in Chemist} \ . 
Jeanne Patterson Olmln, B.S.. I niversit) of Georgia; M.S.. I ni- 
versit) of Wisconsin 

Instructor in Home Economics. 
Meryin Shivers, B.S.E.. Georgia Teachers College 

Instructor in Typewriting and Shorthand. 
Margaret Fortson Stephens, A.B.. Ll.B.. and M.A.. University of 
Georgia; certificat, La Sorbonne, Paris 
Instructor in English. 
•Robert M. Strahl, B.S.C. and M.A., Ohio State University 
Instructor in Finance and Commerce. 
Helen Elizabeth Woodward, B.A., Maryville College; B.S. in L.S., 
Peabody College; M.A., Vanderbilt Universit) 
Librarian. 
M \r.iokie A. Mosley, Associate in Finance and Commerce, Armstrong 
Junior College 

Secretary. 
Margaret Persse, Associate in Liberal Arts, Armstrong Junior College 
Assistant Registrar and Treasurer. 



*On leave of absence. 
fPart time. 

ADULT EDUCATION INSTRUCTORS 
Frederick W. Altstaetter, Graduate. United States Military Acad- 
emy; Colonel, United States Army (Retired!. 
Dvyighi J. Bruce. Production Manager, Savannah Broadcasting Co.. 

Station WTOC. 
Wesley Lee Culpepper, A.B.. University of Georgia. 

Mrs. F. F. Ferguson. A.B.. Elmira College. M.S. University of 

Rochester. 

Walter P. Marshall, B.S. in Arch.. Georgia School of Technology, 

Member A. LA. 
Miss Augusta Oelschig. A.B.. University of Georgia. 
Miss Dorothy Thompson, A.B.. Monmouth College: M.A. in Psych., 

Northwestern I niversit) . 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 7 

HISTORY, ORGANIZATION \\l> UMS 

Realizing thai there was an increasing number <>f young men and 
women who found it inconvenienl <>r inadvisable to continue their edu- 
cation al out-of-town colleges, Mayor Thomas Gamble and a group 
<>l leading citizens conceived the idea of establishing a junior college 
in Savannah. These men. working tirelessl) <>\er a period of months, 
finall) saw their hopes become an actuality when on May 27, 1935, 
the Board of Aldermen authorized the establishment <»f a municipally 
supported junior college to be governed temporarily l>\ a commission 
»>t" fourteen members appointed 1»\ the mayor. The first commission 
was composed of the following leading Savannah citizens: Chairman, 
A. Pratt Adams; Vice-Chairman, Thomas Gamble; Henry Blun, 
H. L. Fulton. H. M. Garwes. H. F. Gibbons. H. V. Jenkins, H. L. Kayton, 
Mrs. Mills B. Lane. A. B. Lovett, Frank W. Spencer, O. B. Strong. 
Mrs. Lucy B. Trosdal, Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 
General Assembly the size of the commission was reduced to eight, 
including the Mayor and Chairman of the Chatham County Board 
of Education as ex-officio members. In 1944, the chairman of Chatham 
County Commissioners, the Superintendent of the Board of Education, 
and the President of the Savannah Chamber of Commerce were added 
as ex-officio members of the commission. The day before the ordinance 
creating the college was passed, Mayor Gamble announced that the 
problem of housing the new school was solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. Moltz 
and her daughter, Mrs. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously presented 
their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. Armstrong, their 
husband and father, respectively. Because of the many spacious rooms, 
remarkably few changes were necessary to fit the building for college 
purposes. The Armstrong Building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, 
is one of the most beautiful and expensive college buildings in the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded the Lucas 
Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in founding the Junior Col- 
lege. In his speech of acceptance, Mr. Gamble announced that he had 
received the gift of a building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house classes 
in finance and commerce, the building to be named in honor of the 
donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings is the 
Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, erected and equipped by the city of Savannah 
and the federal government at a cost of $70,000. All three buildings, 
standing side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park 



\ R M STR o \ G J I M OH COLLEGE 




I ANE BUILDING— Library 



o I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



in the eit\. which consists <>i fortj acres and ia used b) Armstrong 
students foi recreational purposes. The Georgia Eiistorical Society 
Library, to which the Btudents have access, faces the park and lies jn-i 
across Whitakei street from the college buildings. 

I ndei the will <>f the late Carrie Colding, one-hali of th<' -al<- prioi oi 
tin- Colding residence on Jones Street was conveyed t<> the College. 

\ SI 00.000 science building t<> house biology, chemistry and physics 
was constructed b) the citj in L941. This building, the Thomas Gamble 
Hall. i> equipped with excellent laboratories and lecture rooms. 

Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah and the adja- 
cent community 1>\ giving t<» the young men and women who attend its 
classes an understanding of the world in which the) live and an appre- 
ciation of the best that has been achieved by western civilization. Its 
graduates are equipped to continue their studies in the junior class 
of a senior college: but for those who do not desire to pursue their work 
elsewhere, terminal work is offered. The college attempts to pro\ ide 
its students with a keener realization of the duties and responsibilities 
of citizenship and a broader conception of the world and its problems. 

Library 

The college library, occupying the first three floors of the Lane 
Building, includes two beautiful and well-lighted reading rooms on 




LIBRARY READING ROOM— Periodicals 



10 



\ R \l 5TRO N (. .11 Mill! CO I I EG E 




LIBRARY — Reading Room, Reference, Charging Desk 

the main floor of the building, with additional space for study and 
reading provided in the stack room on the third floor, and in the 
attractive and informal reading-lounge off the terrace on the ground 
floor. The library houses at present over 6.000 volumes, with frequent 
and carefully chosen additions to its resources. Emphasis is being 
placed currently on securing books dealing with adult education and 
with the rehabilitation of returning service men and women, as well 
as on obtaining materials to meet the regular academic demands of a 
junior college. Standard reference works are contained in the library, 
and some 80 periodicals are subscribed to. or otherwise currently 
received. Subscription to six newspapers, four of them daily, is main- 
tained. The library is fortunate in being the recipient of a large and 
outstanding collection of history books, the gift of Mr. Thomas Gamble. 
Mayor <»f the (it\ of Savannah. 



Students are encouraged to read widely in the fields of fiction and 
non-fiction, and in particular to keep up with current periodical 
materials. In addition to the resources of the college library, students 
are invited to use the Savannah Public Library and the Library of 
the Georgia Historical Society, the latter onlv one-half block from the 



o I SAVANNAH. GEORGIA 



]] 



Junior College. \n orientation course, dealing in pari w\\\\ training 
in the use of the library, is offered in t h«- fall quartei "I each \<-.n. 

rhe library, which is under the supervision <»i a trained librarian and 
five Btudent assistants, is open each week-da) from II: '><> until 6:00 
and on Saturdays from 9:00 until 1 :00. 

Laboratories 
The college has completer) equipped laboratories in physics, chem 

istrv. biology, and home economics. 

Scholarships 

The income from mone) donated b) Mrs. Arthur Lucas in memory 
of her husband is used for scholarship grants to assist deserving 
students. The original gift of $10,000, together with an additional sum 
of $5,000, has been invested as The Arthur Lucas Scholarship Fund. 

The John Helm Maclean memorial scholarship, established in L945, 
provides a tuition scholarship for qualified applicants. 

Several work-scholarships are granted each year by the college to 
a limited number of students. Such scholarships are awarded on a 
basis of scholastic ability and need. 




NURSES AT WORK IN CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 
AT ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



L2 



A K \I STRON G J l NIOR COLLEGE 



Endowment 

Inaugurated In L944 with contributions of $364.15 from Bome fifty 
members oi tin- Alumni Association, Armstrong's Endowment Fund 
was greatl) increased 1>\ a gift of $20,000 from the Horning Sews, 
The College hereby expresses again sincere appreciation for these con- 
tributions. 

Student Activities 

With a firm belief in the developmental function of individual or 
concerted group expression, Armstrong Junior College has made student 
activities an integral part of its program, with participation in one or 

more <>f its organizations expected of every student. At the end of each 
college year, at the Alumni Luncheon in June, those students who have 
taken part to an outstanding extent in college activities throughout the 
year are awarded a silver "A." A point system, gauging leader-hip 
activity and ability, determines who shall be the recipients of these 
awards. 




M RSES EXAMINE THE SKELETAL SYSTEM l\ \N\TONH CLASS 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 13 

STUDENT SENATE 

The Student Senate i-> composed of tlie following representatives: the 
presidents of the sophomore and freshman classes; th<- editor of the 
Inkwell; the editor <»i tlie Geechee; <»n<- representative from each or« 
ganization recognized I»n tlie Senate: and two freshman representatives 

to be elected !>\ the class one week after election of class officers. Tin- 

group, which meets from time t»> time throughout the \car. >erves as 
the official student agenc\ for coordinating college activities and for 

expressing studenl "pinion. 

nil. -l i DEN I FORI M 

The Student lorum ineels twice each month for consideration of 
national, international and college topics which are of interest to the 
student memhership. Discussions, debates and guest speakers make up 
it- programs. The Sludent Forum usually sponsors a dance and a party 
during the year. The members of the Student Forum assist in many- 
wax- in making the Institute of Citizenship a success. Membership is 
open to any student who wishes to join. An invitation is not necessary. 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

The Home Economics Department maintains a club which meets 
bi-monthly for discussion of current problems. In addition to its reg- 
ular scheduled meetings, this club is frequently responsible for the 
preparation and serving of refreshments at teas, dances, and receptions. 
In the decoration of student lounge rooms and a home economics 
class-room for art courses, practical experience is obtained in the pur- 
chase of furnishings, and in their effective arrangement and use. 

Ml sic CLUB 

The Music Club meets twice each month for programs of classical 
recorded music. \ aried and well-balanced programs of symphony and 
chamber music are arranged, and occasionally music of a lighter vein 
is included. Before each concert in the city, the Music Club presents 
the outstanding works announced for the concert, and in this manner 
serves to build up in its members a familiarity with classical music. 

RADIO CLUB 

The Armstrong Radio Club, youngest organization in the student 
activities program, exists for the purpose of giving students the oppor- 



11 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

t ii ii it \ to participate in the preparation and presentation of various 
types «»f programs over the air. Students * bo belong to this club receive 
b greal deal oi enjoymenl in presenting entertainment, as well as 
valuable training which ma) be useful t<> them later in life. 

At present, the activities <>f this organization are somewhat limited, 
>in< r it i> impossible t<» secure radio equipment. Nevertheless, the 

Radio Club has. in addition to presenting assembly programs at the 
school, broadcast over the air through the facilities of a local radio 

station. 

The college plans to establish its own studio, with complete broad- 
casting equipment, as soon as wartime manufacturing restrictions are 
lifted from the necessary materials. 

RIDING CLUB 

The Riding Club meets each Saturday morning for rides through the 
beautiful wooded bridle paths of the Ranch Riding School. Expert in- 
struction in riding is given all beginners, and supervision is provided 
at all times if desired. Membership in this club may serve as a part of 
the students physical education requirements. A small monthly fee 
is charged. 

ATHLETIC TEAMS 

Basketball, softball. and bowling teams are supervised by the Physical 
Education Department. These teams play in the city tournaments. 

SORORITIES 

There are two social sororities recognized by the college: Alpha Tau 
Beta and Delta Chi. Membership in these groups is by invitation. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Students have complete responsibility for the two Armstrong publica- 
tions: the Inkwell, a monthly newspaper: and the Geechee. the college 
annual. Work on the Inkwell provides opportunity for news reporting, 
feature writing, and other expression of student opinion and talent, as 
well as for actual experience in the business management of a news- 
paper. Participation in the preparation of the Geechee furnishes excel- 
lent experience in photography, lay-out. and in organization generally. 
Here too, facility in handling and financing a publication is acquired 
or increased. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 15 

The Geechee Report, inaugurated lasl year, i- published b) the 
\ I u r mi i Association. It- purpose ii t<> keep t ii« * alumni informed "1 
activities si the college and t»> help them keep in touch with other 
alumni* 

SAl \\\ \H PlAl HO! SE 

The Savannah Playhouse, a community theater sponsored and di- 
rected 1»\ the college, <:i\es the students actual experience in acting, 
make-up, and the techniques of production. Discontinued for the dura- 
tion, the Playhouse will be re-opened as soon as practicable after the war. 

Institute of Citizenship 

Beginning in 1944 the Institute of Citizenship arranged to bring t«> 
the college students and to the people of Savannah a number of lec- 
turers recognized as men and women of outstanding accomplishment 
in national and international affairs. A group of citizens from the 
community, known as the Advisory Committee, cooperated with the 
Director in selecting the subjects and personalities to make up the 
programs for the year. 

The College believes that such a series of lecture-forums is of great 
value to the student body and to the community at large, in that it 
provides an opportunity for hearing and discussing the opinions of 
recognized authorities on matters of public concern. 

The 1944-45 Institute of Citizenship consisted of the following 
programs: 

Dr. C. J. Hambro, President of the League of Nations Assembly and 
of the Norwegian Parliament. "New Aspects of the Peace." 

John Roy Carlson, author of Under Cover, "The Enemy Within." 

Admiral William Harrison Standley. former Ambassador to Russia, 
"How We Can Work With Russia." 

Emil Ludwig. internationally known author. "How to Treat the Ger- 
mans After Defeat." 

Konrad Heiden. author of Der Fuehrer, History of the National Socialist 
Party . . . "Germany Tomorrow." 

Beardsley Ruml, Treasurer of R. H. Macy & Co., authority on federal 
taxation . . . "A Fiscal Policy for Peacetime Prosperity." 



L6 \ R M STRONG .1 I \l OB COLLEGE 

Dr. Eugene E. Pfaff, Director of the Southern Council on International 
Relations . . . "Organization for Peace." 

Sir Norman VngeH Nobel Peace Prize \\ inner, author, statesman, 
"American Defense and the British Commonwealth." 

John Goette and James K. Young, chiefs of the I.YS. Bureaux in China 
and Japan respectively. "Resolved That We Shall Set Up a Mili- 
tary Dictatorship in Japan After the War." 



Dr. Viithrapuram K. Alexander, associated with the One World Asso 

eiation 
in Asia. 



eiation and the Institute of International Affairs, "American Policy 



BOME-COMING 

Early in the Christmas holiday season the College holds the annual 
Home-Coming Reception to which all students and Alumni are invited. 

OPEN HOUSE 

Each Spring the College holds an Open House, to which all students, 
parents, prospective students, and townspeople in general are invited. 
At this time exhibits are held, the work of the students displayed, and 
typical scientific experiments demonstrated. Tours are arranged through- 
out the college buildings, and refreshments are served to all visitors 
by the Home Economics Department. 

Evening Classes for Adults 

To adults interested in advancing their education and information 
Armstrong Junior College offers evening classes in varied subjects. 
These classes carry full college credit to those students properly quali- 
fied, but require no specific entrance qualifications other than an 
interest in learning. The classes meet twice a w r eek in one and one-half 
hour periods at times arranged to suit the convenience of the students. 

Below are listed courses which have proved particularly popular in 
the past; in addition to those listed, courses will be organized in anv 
subject for which sufficient demand exists. 

Biology 11-12. Human Biology. 

English 11. The I se of the English Language, Spoken and Written. 
Histoh H>. World Problems Since 1 ( )1 1. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 17 

Mathematics '• V Survey Course in Principles "I Mathematics. 
Psychology 32, Applied Psychology. 
Psychology 33. Social Psychology. 

Spanish \-2. Introductory Spanish. 

Architecture 1. Home Design and Planning Homes for the Future. 

\ri \2. \i t in Ever) da\ Life. 

Baett'i iolop I. A Laboratory Course in Practical Bacteriology. 

History 11. know Your Allies. 

Mathematics 11. Engineering Mathematics. 

Psychology >1. Major Theories of Personality Development. 

Radio 1. Management and Broadcasting. 

Sociology 61. Family Relations. 



18 \ R M STRONG J I NIOH COLLEGE 

REGISTRATION 

Registration will be conducted on June 11 from 9:00 to 1 :<H) and 

'>: ni 1 to 5:00. I "i othei registration dates see the academic calendar. 

All students will register on the firs! Boor of the Armstrong Building 
in tht' registrar's offii 

Registration is nol complete until fees are paid. 
Requirements for Admission 

ADMISSION Bl CERTIFICATE 

1. A candidate fur admission to Armstrong Junior College must be 
a graduate of an accredited high school with sixteen units of credit. 

2. A genera] average of all high school work amounting to five points 
above the passing grade, when figures are used, or one step above 
passing when letters are used, will be required. 

3. The following specific requirements must also be met: 

A. Eight constants — 3 units in English. 2 units in social studies. 
2 units in mathematics I 1 must be in algebra and 1 should be 
in plane geometry I , and 1 unit in science. 

B. Eight electives — I of these electives must be from the follow- 
ing subjects: English, social studies, mathematics, science, and 
foreign language. Four units may be from the vocational and 
avocational groups. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should be 
made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school and 
mailed directly to the office of the registrar. This certificate becomes 
the property of the Junior College and cannot be returned to the 
applicant. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Students who do not meet the above requirements for admission by 
certificate mav take entrance examinations prescribed by the College. 

\ fee of two dollars is charged for each examination taken. Entrance 
examination- must be completed at least one week before registration. 

Additional information may be secured from the Registrar. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 19 

Fees and Refunds 

Fees will be charged according to the student load in quartei hours. 
\ normal load is U> to 17 quarter hours each term <>i quarter. 

5 quarter hours . . $15.00 
K) quartei hours . . 25.00 

15-17 quarter hours . . 35.00 

A student who maintains a dean's li>t average will be permitted t<» 
take 20 quarter hours a term for $40.00. If for an) reason other stu- 
dents are permitted to take -•» hours of work the charge will be $45.00. 

Students taking laboratory work will he required to pa\ a small fee 
for materials and equipment. This fee is indieated in the description 
of the eourses found under "Courses of Instruction" elsewhere in this 
bulletin. 

A late registration fee of $2.00 will be charged any students who 
fail to register and pay fees on the day designated for registration at 
the beginning of each quarter, unless excused because of sickness. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a quarter will 
receive a refund of one-half of the registration fee. No refunds will 
be made after the first thirty days of a term, and no refunds will be 
made to those dismissed from the college. 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 

Special permission from the Registrar is necessary to drop a subject 
or to transfer from one subject to another. 

Explanation of Course Credit 

A course running five hours a week for one quarter carries 5 quarter 
hours, or 3 1/3 semester hours, credit. One quarter hour credit is 
allowed for each laboratory period. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented in writing, is a prerequisite to hon- 
orable dismissal or re-entrance to this institution. Any student planning 
to withdraw should immediately make such intentions known to the 
administration of the school. 



20 



A K M S T R ( ) N ( I J I MOK COLLEGE 



Dismissal* and Permission to Re-Register 

All Btudenta failing (except in cases excused before examinations on 
account of sickness) to pass at least one course other than physical 
education in an) one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. Ml Students who fail to make an average of at least four honor 
point- during the first three quarters 1 work at the Junior College will 
not be allowed to re-register. W ithdrawal is recommended to all stu- 
dents with less than a * 4 C" average at the end of the fourth quarter of 
college work, and at the end of the sixth quarter of college work a stu- 
dent must have an average of three-fourths an honor point per course 
in order to re-register. 

Reports and Grades 

Reports for every student will be sent to the parent or guardian at 
the end of every quarter. The reports are based upon the following 
system of marking: 

A plus (95-100) 4 honor points per course 

A (90-95) 3 honor points per course 

B (80-90) 2 honor points per course 

C (70-80) 1 honor point per course 

D (65-70) No honor points per course 

E I Incomplete) . . . Minus one honor point per course 

F (Failure) .... Minus one honor point per course 

\n E (incomplete) may be removed by means stipulated by the in- 
structor of the course in which the student received the grade E. An 
E not removed in the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an F. 

In order to graduate, a student must receive as many honor points, 
based on the above grading system, as the number of courses required 
for graduation. 

Honors 



Student- who maintain a grade of B or above in each course dur- 
ing a quarter's work will be plated on the Dean's Scholastic Attain- 
ment List. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 21 

The 20 of i 1 I advanced students and (2) students with leai than 

>i\ quarters 1 work who have the highest averages, provided tin- .i^ 1 
i- W B" or better, and have tailed no courses, will have then names re- 
corded on a permanent Dean's List in a hook for thai purpose kept 
m the office o! the President. 

Sununa Cum Laude (with highest distinction) will be bestowed upon 
those receiving an average ol 3 honor points per course. 

\ valedictorian will he elected h\ the graduating class from among 
the five students with the highest scholastic average in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Absences 

If a student finds it necessary to be absent from class more than 
three times he should present a satisfactory explanation of each addi- 
tional absence to his instructor. 

Course Requirements for Graduation 
A student must maintain an average of "C" to graduate. 

Quarter 
LIBERAL ARTS Hours 

Biology 1-2 or 

Biology 11-12 I Human Biology > 10 

Economics 21 I Introductory I 5 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 I Literature ► or 

World Literature 1-2 10 

Foreign Language 10 

History 2-3 or 

History 41-42 10 

Mathematics 1 I Introductory I or 

Mathematics 2 (College Algebra I 5 

Ten hours from following: 
Physical Science 11-12 
Economics 22 
Sociology 60 
Laboratory Sciences 
Foreign Language 10 



22 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Quarter 
Hours 

Library Science and Orientation required 

Physical Education 1-2 required 

Electives 20 

Total ')<) 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Biology 1-2 or / 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biolog) I 10 V 

Chemistry 1-2 (Inorganic) 10 * 

English 11-12 (Freshman! 10 y 

English 23-24 or World Literature 1-2 10 S 

Twenty-five hours from following: 

Art 11 / 

Chemistry 5 (Organic! 

Home Economics 1 (Clothing) ^ 

Home Economics 2-3 ( FoodsV 

Home Economics 5 (Home Furnishing)-/ 

Home Economics 6 (Nutrition) 25 

History 2-3 or 41-42 10 

Library Science and Orientation required 

Mathematics 1 5 

Sociology 60 5 

Physical Education 1-2 required 

Electives 5 

Totals 90 

FINANCE AND COMMERCE 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology) 10 

Twenty-five hours from following: 
Commerce 2, 3, 4, (Accounting) 
7 (Monej and Banking) 
10 (Insurance! 14 (Statistics! 25 



(» I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

Quarti i 

llulll- 

Economica 21 (Introductory) and 

22 (World Resources) LO 

English 11-12 (Freshman) 1 ( > 

English 23-24 (Literature) or 

World Literature 1-2 LO 

History 2-3 or 11-12 LO 

Librarj Science and Orientation required 

Mathematics 1 (Introductory) or 

Mathematics 2 (College Algebra) 5 

Physical Education 1-2 required 

Electives 10 



Total 90 



Suggestions to Students in Regard to Courses 

In general, students who expect to continue their college work toward 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Com- 
merce, etc., will take the Liberal Arts course at Armstrong Junior Col- 
lege. Students are urged to consult the catalog of the senior college or 
university which they expect to attend and plan their courses at Arm- 
strong accordingly. 

It is recommended that engineering students take only one year at 
Armstrong which will include two or three courses in chemistry, three 
courses in mathematics beginning with college algebra, and the remain- 
ing courses in freshman requirements. 

Pre-medical students are advised to schedule all their electives (20 
hours) as well as the last group requirements of 10 hours in the lab- 
oratory sciences (biology, chemistry, physics) in order that they may 
be able to complete requirements for admission to medical school within 
one year after graduation from Armstrong. 



Program for Student Nurses 

Armstrong Junior College, in cooperation with the Candler Hospital, 
offers the following program for student nurses: 



24 I R MSTRO N C J U N I O R C OLL EGE 

Hours 
COl RSI Crr.la 

AiKitomv In and Physiology In 6 

English In :; 

Sociology 61n .') 

Microbiology Ln 3 

Chemistr) L3d 4 

*.Nursing ln 1 

*. Nursing 2n and 3n 

* .Nursing Arts 4n 4 

Psychology ln 3 

Home Economics 2n 3 

*Home Economics 5n 2 

•Physical Education ln 1 

* Physical Education 2n 1 



Total 34 

*Courses given by Candler Hospital. 



o I S \ \ INN \ ll. Gl 0RG1 \ 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR NURSES COURSES 

liiaionn In I wo lecture or recitation periods and one three* 
boui laboratory period. The course runs through two quarters, ■" ma) 
be conducted in one quarter. Fee, $2.50 each quarter. 

This course is conducted concurrentl) with the course in physiology, 
thus integrating tin" subject matter. The course includes both gross and 
microscopical anatomy. Lectures, demonstrations and Borne dissection. 

Physiology In This course is conducted concurrentl) with tin- course 
in anatomy. In the integration of the two courses, a basic understanding 

of the functions of the normal human body is presented so as to enable 
the student better to understand health, nutrition, and the pathological 
changes due to disease. The blood group of each student is ascertained 
and recorded. The methods of instruction are the same as in anatomy. 

Microbiology In — Two lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee, $2.00. 

The title "microbiology" is used because it is that branch of biolog) 
that deals with plant and animal forms, while bacteriology includes 
only the micro-organisms of vegetable origin. The characteristics and 
activities of micro-organisms and their relation to health and disease 
are studied; also the sources, modes, and prevention of infection and 
isolation; disinfection and asepsis; tissue changes in the healing process, 
infections and neoplasms. Explorations of scientists in the field of 
microbiology and new discoveries applicable to health conservation are 
noted. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and laboratory work. 

Chemistry 13n — Three lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee, $2.50. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the principles 
of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with special applica- 
tions to nursing practice. General composition of blood and urine is 
studied; the students volunteering to eat certain diets which show rela- 
tionship of utilization of foods, and kidney function through urinalysis. 

Sociology 61n — This course considers ( 1) the principles of sociology; 
(2) the nurse as a citizen of the community and as a professional 
worker; (3) the importance of the hospital among the social agencies in 
the community; (4) the patient in the hospital coming from the family 
and returning to the family. Three hours. 



26 ARMSTRONG JIM OR COLLEGE 

Home Economics 2n Nutrition and Food Preparation, three hours. 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and food preparation are 
considered. The nutrition retirements of children and of adults are 
compared. Special attention is given to the nutrition requirements of 
childhood and pregnancy. 

Psychology In — Three hours. This course is an introduction to the 

>tud\ of human behavior with emphasis on the underlying principles of 
mental adjustments. The importance of the nurse's own personality is 
stressed. 

English In — Three hours. A basic course in the fundamental of read- 
ing, writing, and speaking English. 



01 SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

( 01 RSE DESCRIP1 IONS 

\ki 

\it II. lit Principles <tn<I Design. Two lectures and eighl hours 
laborator) work each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, 12.50. 

\ stud) of the principles of art as Been in familiar works of art and 
as applied in problems of everyda) lif«'. Laborator) periods involve 
illustration of art principles, textile design, and costume design. 

BlOLIOGY 

Biology 1-2, Principles of Animal Biology. Three hours lecture and 
five hours laboratory a week for two quarters. Laboratory fee. $2.50 
each quarter. 

An introductory course dealing with the fundamental facts of Animal 
Biology. Lectures, combined with laboratory studies of representative 
animal types, give the student accurate conceptions of the processes of 
living things, nutrition, growth, reproduction, heredity and evolution. 
BS \n ell as training in accuracy of interpretation of structure and thor- 
oughness in dissection. 

Biology 3. Invertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite Biology 1-2. Three 
hours lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Labora- 
tory fee. S3.00. 

An intensive study of invertebrate animals and their relationships, 
with special emphasis on local fresh-water and marine forms. 

Biology 4. Vertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite Biology 1-2. Three hours 
lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Laboratory 
fee. $3.00. 

An intensive study of the vertebrate group including laboratory dis- 
section of several types. The study includes the kinds of vertebrates 
and their distribution, vertebrate embryology, and details of the various 
vertebrate organ systems. 

Biology 11-12. Human Biology. Five hours a week for two quarters. 
Materials fee, $1.00. 

A non-laboratory survey course in the principles of living things. 
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the 
general biological principles, particularly as applied to the human or- 



28 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

ganism. I he fust half of the < mux- includes a studs of the fundamental 
EactS OJ biology, human anatoni\ and physiology. The second half of 
the com- ■ Includes studies in problems of public health, reproduction, 
genetics, evolution and eugenics. 

* Biology 21. Laboratory Technic. Prerequisites Biol«i«\ 1-2. Three 
hours Lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. 

A course in methods of preparing microscope slides, preservation 
of tissues, and blood analysis. Methods of preparing tissues, staining, 
mounting, blood counting, blood typing and introductory work in 
clinical and laboratory chemistry are practiced. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 1-2. General Chemistry. Four hours of class room work 
and five hours laboratory a week for two quarters. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Deposit, $2.50. 

This is an introductory course designed to meet the needs of students 
who are interested in medicine, engineering, and other sciences. In 
general, the students will study the preparation, properties and uses 
of a number of non-metallic and metallic elements and their compounds. 
The fundamental laws of elementary inorganic chemistry are stressed. 
The laboratory work offers several experiments which serve as an intro- 
duction to Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 

Chemistry 3. Qualitative Analysis. Prerequisite Chemistry 1-2 or the 
equivalent. Four hours class room work and six hours laboratory a 
week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Deposit, S5.00. 

The lectures deal with the theoretical aspects of the subject with 
special reference to the application of the Law of Mass Action. The 
laboratory work will consist of a study of the recreations, precipitations 
and detections of the principal metals and acid radicals. 

Chemistry 4. Quantitative Analysis. Prerequisite Chemistry 1-2. Two 
hours lecture and nine hours laboratory work a week for one quarter. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Deposit, $5.00. 

A course designed to meet the needs of pre-medical students and 
others who wish an introduction to the subject. The class work is con- 



Nol offered 1945-46. 



(i I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

oerned with theory, procedure, and problems. I li<- laboratory ezei 
involve both volumetric and gravimetric determinations. 

( o\i mi i;< i 

Commerce 51. Beginning Typing. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
(Two quarter hours credit.) Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

This course consists <d introductory instruction in the technical fea- 
tures and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper touch, and 
mastery of the keyboard. \n average speed <>f thirty words a minute 

LS attained. 

Commerce 52. Intermediate Typing. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. (Two quarter hours credit.) Prerequisite Commerce 51 or equiva- 
lent. Laboratory fee. 83. 50. 

Special emphasis is placed on business letters, carbon copies, manu- 
script typing, rough drafts, legal documents and tabulations. An aver- 
age speed of forty words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 53. Advanced Typing. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
i Two quarter hours credit. I Prerequisite Commerce 51-52 or equiva- 
lent. This course offers the student special opportunity to perfect his 
typing technique. Special emphasis is given to speed building and 
practical application. 

Commerce 61. Beginning Shorthand. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. (Three quarter hours credit. ) Theory of Gregg Shorthand. 

Commerce 62. Intermediate Shorthand. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. (Three quarter hours credit.) Prerequisite Commerce 61 or 
equivalent. 

Continuation of theory of shorthand and beginning dictation. 

Commerce 63. Advanced Shorthand. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. (Three quarter hours credit. I Prerequisite Commerce 61-62 or 
equivalent. 

Dictation and Transcription. Student is required to take dictation at 
the rate of eighty words a minute. 

Commerce 64. Secretarial Practice. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Laboratorv fee. 83.50. 



30 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

This course stresses office procedure, duplicating, filing, clerical and 
secretarial problems. I h<" studenl becomes familiar with all t\pes of 
business documents. 

(The following courses are not offered L945-46) : 

Commerce 2-3. Introductory Accounting. Three hours lecture- and 

four hours laboratory a week for t\\" quarters. 

Commerce I. iccounting Problems. Three lectures and four hours 
Laboratory a week. 

Commerce 5. Marketing. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce 7. Money and Banking. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce 10. Insurance. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce 14. Elements oj Statistics. Prerequisite Mathematics 1. 
Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce 31-32. Field Work. Fifteen hours per week for two quar- 
ters. Ten quarter hours credit. 

Economics 

Economics 23. Introduction to Economic Theory and Problems. Five 
hours a week for one quarter. 

This course presents a survey of economic thought of the past and 
present, makes an analysis of the economic institutions of today and 
examines some of the major economic problems in the modern world. 

* Economics 22. World Resources. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

English 

English 11-12. A Double Course for Freshmen. Five hours a week 
for two quarters. 

The first half of the course is devoted to a review of punctuation and 
the fundamentals of grammar, theme writing and vocabulary building. 
The second half of the course continues written composition and intro- 
duces the student to various types of literature. Throughout the course 
the student is asked to make reports on novels and biographies read 



' Not offered 1945-46. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 31 

out of class and to wi it«' term papers dealing with some phase ol the 
material covered during each quarter. 

World Literature 1-2 (Formed) Humanities 1-2), I Double Course 

tor Sophomores. Five hours a week for two quarters. 

\ genera] survej <>l tin- leading intellectual and esthetic movements 
of historic times, with particular emphasis on the cultural achievements 
of the West Selections are read from the works of the greatest Literarj 
figures from Homer to Checker . 

* English I. in Introduction to Poetry. Elective. Five hours a week 
I'm one quarter. 

\ study of the various types and forms of poetry with particular 
emphasis on the works of the more recent British and American poets. 

* English 13. Advanced Composition. Elective. Five hours a week 
for one quarter. 

Advanced writing practice. The course is largely designed to help 
the student express his ideas in clear, well-organized and interesting 
prose. Various techniques of composition are considered, but the main 
portion of the course is devoted to the writing and re-writing of straight- 
forward exposition. 

English 23. Early English Literature. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A survey of the leading movements and authors of English literature 
from Beowulf to the Romantic Period. 

English 24. Recent English Literature. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A continuation of English 23; a survey of the leading movements 
and authors of English Literature from the Romantic Period to the 
present. 

English 25. American Literature. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A survey of American literature including a studv of the works of 
the leading figures with particular emphasis on more recent authors. 



* Offered in alternate vears. 



32 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

I i;i \< ii 

French l-~. Elementary French. Five hours a week for two quarters. 

A course for beginners. Grammar, oral and written practice, early 
reading of selected material in French. In the second quarter, the read- 
ing objective will he emphasized along with continued practice in con- 
versation and composition. 

French 3. Intermediate French. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A course in review grammar. Oral and written practice; reading of 
selected texts. 

French 7. Introduction to Literature. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A survey course with particular emphasis on the nineteenth centurv. 
Written and oral reports on collateral readings. 

French 8. French Classical Drama. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine are studied. Four 
plays are read in class and four plays read as collateral. 

French 9. French Short Stories. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the short story in France with varied reading and dis- 
cussion of selected authors. 

History 

History 2-3. American and European History Since the American 
Revolution. Five hours a week for two quarters. 

These two courses provide a parallel study of the major political 
social and economic developments which have taken place in the Lnited 
States since the establishment of their independence and in Europe 
since the outbreak of the French Revolution. Attention is concentrated 
on the foundation of American political institutions, the growth of 
American democrac) and the emergence of the United States as a great 
industrial world power. \\ ith respect to Europe, the fundamental factors 
in modern European civilization are examined: industrial revolution, 
nationalism, democracy, socialism and the world conflicts which have 
resulted from these developments. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

riiston 2-3 are required «»l all students and ma) be taken separately. 

History 5. English History. General Course. Five hours a week f«>i 
one quarter. 

\ stud) of English political and social Institutions from earl) times 
to the present with special emphasis ^ i \ « - 1 * t<> developments since the 
Tudor period. 

History 6. Latin imerica. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

This course deals with the colonial, revolutionary and recent develop- 
ments in the countries of Hispanic America. 

History 11-12. Comparative Imerican History. Five hours a week 
for two quarters. 

A study of the cultural, economic and diplomatic relationships of the 
United States to the rest of the world during the last one hundred and 
fift\ vears. with attention concentrated on its role in the present conflict. 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 1. Clothing. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. 

This course is designed to establish appreciations, interests, habits, 
and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, design, construction, and 
care of clothing. Problems are provided so that students gain exper- 
ience in application of these principles. A study of good grooming 
habits is included. 

Home Economics 2. Foods. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $7.50. 

A study of the basic facts underlying food selection and preparation. 
The laboratory periods provide opportunity for practical experience 
in cookery. 

Home Economics 3. Foods. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. S7.50. 

A continuation of the study in foods including different types of 
dishes used for specific purposes, food selection, meal planning, and 
table service. Students gain actual experience in all forms of family 
entertaining such as family meals, buffet, teas, receptions, etc. 



ARMSTRONG J I NIOR COLLEGE 

Hume Economic* •>. Home Planning and Furnishing. Four lectures 
and one laboratory period each week for one quarter. 

\ Btud) of planning and furnishing the home from the standpoint 
of famih needs; modern tendencies in housing and application of prin- 
ciples of art to home furnishing; a short histor) of architecture and 
furniture: Btud) of furnishing various rooms emphasizing heating. 
lighting, and treatment of walls, floors, windows, together with selection 
and arrangement of furnishings. 

Home Economics 6. Nutrition. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
A Btud} of nutritive requirements of individuals and family groups; 
relative eosts of foods; dietary calculations. Emphasis is placed on 
nutritive properties of foods, and on the requirements for energy, 
proteins, mineral elements and vitamins. 

Library Science and Orientation 

An orientation course, required of all freshmen, is offered in the 
fall quarter of each year. This course, which includes instruction in 
library methods, practice in remedial reading, and aid in the develop- 
ment of effective study habits, is given under the supervision of various 
faculty members. Two hours a week for one quarter. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 1. Freshman Mathematics. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A beginning course in algebra, statistics, finance and trigonometry. 

Mathematics 2. College Algebra. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

This course begins with a review of factoring, fractions, exponents 
and radicals, linear and quadratic equations, and includes a stud) of 
progressions, the binominal theorem, and theory of equations. 

Mathematics 3. Trigonometry. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

\ i ourse covering the solution of the right and general triangle, the 
general solutions of trigonometric equations, and polar coordinates. 

Mathematics 4. Analytic Geometry. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. Prerequisite Mathematics 3. 



(i I SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

Thia course includes tin- analytic geometry of point, line and circle, 
conic sections, transformation <•!" coordinates, polar and rectangulai 
graphs, and parametric equations. 

Mathematics 8. Spherical Trigonometry and Mathematics o) iviation. 
Five hours a week for one quarter. Prerequisite Plane Trigonometry. 

This course is designed to give tin' student Borne <d the practical 
aspect- of spherical trigonometry as applied t<> navigation and aviation. 

Meteorology 

Meteorology 1. Introductory Meteorology. Five hours lecture a week 
for one quarter. 

An introductory course in the elements of the weather, including 
practical work with weather instruments, reading and preparation of 
weather maps, and the development of an understanding of the prob- 
lems involved in weather analysis. 

Physical Education 

Each student is required to take three hours of physical education a 
week throughout the year. The following program is provided: 

During the Fall and Winter Quarters emphasis is placed on basket- 
ball, calisthenics, games, relays, posture and corrective exercises. 

During the Spring the program includes Softball, swimming and 
tennis. 

Physics and Physical Science 

Physical Science 11-12. A Survey of the Physical Sciences. Five 
hours lecture a week for two quarters. 

A two-quarter course covering the general principles of the physical 
sciences. The first quarter is a survey of physics and astronomy; the 
second quarter covers chemistry, geography, geology, palaeontology . 

Physics 21. Mechanics. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory 
work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per quarter. 
Deposit. S2.50. 

A. course dealing with the fundamental laws of mechanics. Emphasis 
is placed upon the solution of problems. 

Physics 22. Heat, Light and Sound. Four hours lecture, two hours 



ARMSTRONG Jl \l OR COLLEGE 

Laboratory work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per 
quarter. Deposit, $2.50. 

A Stud) of Wave motion and sound, heat, and light. 

Physics 23. Electricity. Pour hours Lecture, two hour- laboratory 
work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per quarter. 
Deposit, $2.50. 

This course deals primarily with the principles of electricity and 
magnetism. Some of the newer concepts in the field of electronics, 

radiation, and atomic structure are also included. 

Political Science 

*Political Science 12. National Government of the United States. 
Five hours a week for one quarter. 

*Political Science 13. State and Local Government. Five hours a 
week for one quarter. 

Psychology 

Psychology 31. Introductory Psychology. Five hours lecture a week 
for one quarter. 

An introductory lecture course in psychology, including discussions 
of learning, memory, behavior, psycho-biological relationships, morale, 
and motivation. 

Psychology 32. Applied Psychology. Five hours lecture a week for 
one quarter. 

A course in the applications of psychological principles in everyday 
life. Work includes personality and its improvement, public speaking, 
salesmanship, advertising, child psychology, psychology of music and 
art. personnel management, and other phases. 

Psychology 33. Social Psychology. 5 hours a week for one quarter. 

This course is an introduction to the psychology of groups. An analysis 
is made of the physiological and socio-cultural motivation of the in- 
dividual from infancy to adulthood from the standpoint of his group 
relationships. Special attention is given to a study of leadership, the 
development of radical and conservative qualities, propaganda, war. 
fascism, communism, delinquency and public opinion. 



01 savannah, georgia 

Sociai Sciences 

Social Science I. ( ontemporary Georgia, Five hours .1 week l"i one 
quarter. 

The purpose of this course is t<> familiarize the studenl with the 
problems <»l the state »>l Georgia and to make him more aware of its 
government, economic, ><»< ial and cultural activities. 

(Contemporar) Georgia is required l<>r graduation from tin- I ni- 
\ ersit) ol Georgia. 1 

Sociology 

Sociology 60, Marriage and the Family. Five hours each week for 
(•lit' quarter. 

A study of famil) backgrounds, preparation for marriage, marriage 
interaction and family administration, family economics, problems of 
parenthood, family disorganization. A study of the family in war time 
and present day trends in family life is included. 

Spanish 

Spanish 1-2. Elementary Spanish. Five hours a week for two quarters. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with the 
elements of Spanish by reading, composition and speaking. 

Spanish 3. Intermediate Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Grammar review, composition and selected prose readings. 

Spanish 4. Advanced Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

The purpose of this course is to increase the students' facility in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish litera- 
ture are read. 

Spanish 5. Commercial Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of business letters and forms used by the Spanish-speaking 
world and of the vocabulary of trade, travel and communication. 

Spanish 6. Modern Prose Readings. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

This course provides intensive reading of novels, plays and short 
stories of Nineteenth and Twentieth century Spanish and Latin-Ameri- 
can authors. 



38 



ARMSTRONG J I N I OK COLLEGE 
OFFICERS OF ALUMM ASSOCIATION 



Sam J. Gardner, Jr President 

Mrs. Sterli Lebei Wilder Vice-Presidmi 

Miss Lucretia Edwards Secretary 

Mi{\ JULIA Ann TYRE Treasurer 



GRADUATES OF L944 
Associate in Liberal Irts 



Julanie Amelia Branson 

Bettj I •orraine Butler 

J- rank Sellars Cheatham, Jr. 

Carsuell Hill Cobb 
Catherine Elizabeth Coyle 
( liai lotte Eubanks Guest 
William Roy Hancock 
Mary Elizabeth Hardy 
.Mary Louise Key 
Stella Marie Lyons 



Gertrude M\ ra Marcus 
Jam- < iheesborough Martin 
^Htflon Milton Melaver 
IVfeegan Lorraine Montgomery 
Mary Catherine Murphy 
Marian Ruth Nelson 
Margaret Persse 
Kathleen Thorpe 
Foster Margarett Williams 



Associate in Home Economics 



Betty Dennison Griner 
Benny Jane Newton 
Doris Josephine Perkins 
Geraldine lone Swint 



Jessie Crump Vannerson 
Evangeline Rose Yarn 
Helen Collins Wolfe 



Associate in Finance and Commerce 
Carolyn Smith 



PERMANENT DEAN'S LIST OF DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 



Graduates 



Carswell Hill Cobb 

Stella Marie Lyons 

Jane Cheesborough Martin 

Norton Milton Melaver 

IVfeegan Lorraine Montgomery 

Mai garel Persse 

Jessie Crump Vannerson 

Foster Margaretl Williams 

Helen Collins Wolfe 



Non-Graduates 

"A" Average 
Beverly Fay Culbertson 
Ethel Fessopulos tone quarter) 

"BT Average 
Lisette Catherine Black 
\nna Tallulah Cone 
\ irginia Helen Danklefs 
\\ illiam Edward Dismer 
Margaret Streeter Holt 
Henrietta Kicklighter 
Grace Nfardette Neel 

Lillian Nichols 

June Poindexter <S quarters) 

Willie Kate Purvis 

Marguerite Morrissy Storer 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



I 



STUDENTS ATTENDING UIMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

L944-1945 



\li.i 11. John 
Mini. Elizabeth 

Baxuin, Sybil W. 

Boone, \ trginia 

f»i j Bon, John 

Burton, Rm] 

( larellas, Pauline 

( laghorn, Margaret 

C.lp. Mrs. Helen V. 

I >a\ is, Monique 

Dillon. J,, hn 

Dinner. William 

Elliott, Nam ■> 
, Elliott, Thomas 

Fessopulos, Ethel 

FbjJ . M a t \ 

Putrelle, Franklin 

Gordon. Murray 
Harris, Cecile 
Hart. Dorria 
Hodges, Mbert 
Jarrett. Elizabeth 



Summer Session, I'M 1 



I .amas, Fifi 
LaRoche, Elizabeth 

1 r\ inc. \\ illiam 

Marsh, Man 
Martin. ( laroline 
Matthews, Uice 
\\< Teei . I >i< k 
Pitta, Marj Louise 
Poindexter, .1 tine 

Habhan. Da\ id 

Roffinan. Gloria 

Hoi:--!-. < aro|\ n 
Salas, Helen 
Shayr, \nnie 
Silverman, Harry 
Simon, Nick 
Sipple, Sara Mae 
Thorpe, Sarah 
Llman, Bennie 
^ aites, Janie 
-Woods, James B. 



STUDENT BODY 1944-15 



Ahern. John 
Allen, Edythe 
Mitonopolo. Georgia 
Arnold. Sena 
Asbell. Edwina 
Baggs, Ruth 
Baker, Lilla 
Barnes. Mary Ann 
BarTrirt. Sybil W. 
Beemer, Mrs. Doris 
Bennett. Ruth 
Black. Lisette 
Blair. Estelle 
Bliss, Catherine 
Boone. Virginia 
B<>\ kin. Win wood 
Bright. Marie 
Brinson, Margaret 
Brown. Evelyn 
Browne. Jean 
Brushwood. Lenora 
Buckner. Emily 
Burnside. Betty 

r>4* i' ( 4 * 1 1 [ > ri «. 

Byrd. Laura 
Capitan. Marina 
Carellas. Patdine 
Chapman. Marjo'rie 
Claghorn. Margaret 
Clanton. Jeanne 



Clark, Grace 

Clark. Juanita 

Clark, Mary 

Cone, Anna 

Cook, Pattie 

Crawford, Mar\ 

Cronemiller, Dorothy 
iCronin, James 

Culbertson, Beverly Fay 

' nip. Helen \ . 

Danklefs. Virginia 

Davi*. Monicpie 

Dean. Mary Lee 
'De Frank, Marion 

Demosthenes. Electra 

Denny, Elizabeth 

I >ismer. William 

Dow ning. Emmalyn 
4)upree. Gwendolyn 

El I wards, John 

Eitel. Beverly 

JVtt iOtt. _ ^ HTir> 

Fawcett, Sara 
Felton, Patricia 
Fennell. Shirley 
Ferrelle. Edna 
Fes^ofm4rrs. Etrrel 
Fetner. Kathryn 
Gaster. Anna Ruth 
Gaudrv. Leolene 



10 



ARMSTRONG II NIOR I OLLEGE 



Gilchrist, Marj 
( A\ mi. Jeannette 

( folson, Mai i\ 

< -i.i. .11. Lillian 
« hreene, I larold 

< .i,,--. I kriores 
1 1 ai If. Frances 

I [anson, Jeanne 

Harp. H. \. 

IWr^. < iuuk 

Henderson, Lindsay P., Jr. 

I [endrix, Edna 

Hewett, Nelle 

I lt\ man. Catherine 

Hinely, Anne 

Holloway, Mrs. Janice 

Holt. Margaret 

Hornstein, Helen 

Hubert. BettJ 

Hunter. Juanita 

H\ mes, ( !omer 

Jan. -it. Elizabeth 

Javetz. Jeanne 

Johnson. Charles P.. Jr. 

Johnson, Dorothy 

Johnson. Elizabeth 

Johnson. Shirley 

Johnston. Helen 

Jones. Lillie Mae 

Jones. Pauline 

Kapner. Maxine 

Kaufmann. Louise 

Keeter. Mrs. Edward 

Kicklighter. Henrietta 

Kitchens. Sara 

Knight. Stuart 

Kuhlke. Edith 

Lain. Mrs. Mary 
v Lamar. Howard 

llamas, rift 

LaR^*4ff. E liz abet h 

Lawing, Mrs. R. R. 
v Lee. E. S. 

Linton. Mrs. Dolores 

Lowell. Shirley 

Lucree. Jeanne 

I yons, ( 'harles 

1 % sett, Thomas 

Maguire, Elizabeth 

Malphrus. Florrie Lee 

Mather, Dorothy 

.NUtlhews, Alice 
Ma\ riki-. James 

McGinn. Joy 
McMillan, Mary 
Meadows, Betsye Jane 
Mendel, Muriel 
Middlebrooks, Jane 
Miller. Mrs. Rachel 
Miller. Snsan 
Monsees. Catherine 



IMoon I ■'.. Jr. 

Morris, Y I .. 
Moselej . ( russie 
Moii. Robert 
Mull.-. Ruth 
Munden, Billie Sue 
Neel, Mardette 
Nichols, Lillian 
Nielsen, Mary 
Nugent, John 
Parish, Shirley 
Parrott, Dolores 
Penn. Eloise 
Pharis. Helen 
Pih her. Ennis 
Pitt*. Mary Lo»»i-»- 

Purvis, Kate 

Rabhan. Joan 
Richardson, Thomas 
Robertson. Helen 
Roesel, Wilma 

II* *1 llltdll, * t"|#*t rti 

Roffman. Rose 
Sogers, John W. 
Rosenthal, Charlotte 
Rowland. Helen 
Royce. Janet 
Ryan, Angela 
Schaupp. Virginia 
Scoville. Rose 
Seckinger. George 
Skaw^inme 
Simon. *ick 
Smith. Joyce 
Smith. Marguerite 
Smith, Mr-. Martha 
Spillane. Janet 
Stewart, N. J. 
Storej, Marguerite 
Suggs. Jack 
Theus. Charlton 
Thompson. Eugene 
Thompson. Joyce 
Troughton. Leon 
I agar, Helene 
Wagner. Mrs. Gladvs D. 
Weiss. Ruth 
Wells. Jeannette 
W. rnieke. Anne 
Whalley. John 
W heeler. Jean 
Williams. Davant 
W illiams. James 
Williams. John L. 
Wills. Miriam 
Wimberly, Gloria 
^ imkIs, Jamrs Ruck 
W orth, Ceraldine 
^ arbrough. Anne 
Yarley. Julie 



(» I SAVANNAH. GEORGIA 



ii 



CADET M RSES, L944 l. 



\ 1 1 1 1 1 . » 1 1 \ . Martha 
Barnhill, Uma 

Br\ill. Man 
Howell. Do] is 
Bruce, Marion 
Burton, Jeanette 

Dun ciitt'. Nora 

Eitel, BevcrJi 
I \l. \ . Harriet 
Fountain, Eveline 
Golden, Mattie 
Grimes, Estelie 
I i\ ingston, Madeline 
Manning, Ernie Lee 
McCoy, Dorothy 
McManus, Floree 
Morrison, ( lolleen 
Murphy. Cecelia 
Murray. Carolyn 
Nix, Lillie Mar 

( hscns. Eveline 



Patterson, I va Belle 
Pi iester, Elizabeth 
Rahn, Merle 
Rogers, Jean 
Seal lioio. M ildred 
Shelnutt, Sara 
Shepard, Rub) 
Sikes, Bettj 
Sikes, Lenette 

Smith. Mailha 

Smith. Marj 
Smith. Thelma 

Sowell, V LTginia 

Tatum, \u<lrc\ 
Thompson, Mar) 
I ia\ i-. Carolyn 
Walker, Emma 
Walsh, Sidney 
\\ estbrook, Dannelle 
Wildes, Sarah 
\\ iUoii, Louise 






STUDENTS ENROLLED IN EVENING CLASSES 



\dler, Florence Kolman 
Mrtlen, George J. 
uArrXon. Cpl. Harry 
Jfcfrnes, Ellis 
Mr\. C. E. 

Bazuin. Mrs. J. B. 

Beeltr. Bettj 
iPeTfy, S. L. 

Bodiford, Mrs; Nora 
jB*ryce. Joseph F. 

Boyles, Mrs. Lily 

Brennan, Mary E. 
uhaker, Sgt. John 
"lire. Rufus C. 

Bulcken, Jane 

Cain, Ruth E. 

Cartwright, Sadie 

Chaskin. Mrs. Beatrice 

Clapp, Josephine 
udSrke, Leland T. 

Clary. Mrs. Carrie 

Coates, Frances 

Coates. Mrs. Rose 

Colson, Mrs. Nettie 

Connor, Mary'S. 

Coolidge, Mrs. C. W. 

( !ulp, Mrs. I Irlen 

Dalv, Joy 

DeLorme, Mrs. W. K. 

Dowdney. Ella Hey ward 

Drane, Myrtle 

Drawdy. C. R. 

Dupuy. Vivian R. 



Edwards, Mrs. Mary Ann 

Epps, Arahelle 

Eskedor, Norine 
•\Ertenson, Capt. M. E. 

Fain, Mrs. J. E. 

Fawcett, Dorothy 

Figg, Eunice 
LEWd, M. H. 

Frazier, Mrs. Frances 
LGoddard. \\U 
\J>rodman, Kyle E. 

Grant, Mrs. Mary K. 
Lumber. A. M. 

Haar, Josephine 

Hall. Mrs.S. F. 

Hambric, Mrs. Frances 

Harms. Kathleen 
U*ar P , R. A. 

U4a"wthorn. Hubert 
V^tedges, Pvt. Allan 

Heyman, Lillian 

Howard. Judy 

Howard. Marie Pearson 

I [udson, Russell 

Huff. Mildred 

Hnrst, E. W. 

Tnglesbv, John 
- iHgram, W. W. 

Kandel, Mrs. II. M. 

Kantsiper. Sarah 

Kay, Mary J. 

Keejer, Mrs. Edward 
^Kolgaklis. Kalliope 



\2 



ARMSTRONG I I NIOR COLLEGE 



Kolroan, Esther 
I anier, Mrs. Urna 
I attimore, Mrs. W na. 
rette, J. O. 

I \. 

I. Win. S. 

r, \\ 1 1 1 i a 1 1 1 

\l.ii lean, Mrs. Malcolm 

Mallory, Mrs. Millie 

Martin, Sadie 

M. Uoy.J. W. 

M. < i- ll.ii:. < arelyn 

Mi Cloy, Mrs,J. S. 

M. Rae, D. \. 

Miller, < Catherine T. 

Miltiades, Mrsi Bessie 

Mingledorff, Mrs. (Harnett 

Moore, < Haire 

Nelson, Mrs. Lenoir 

\«-\ ill.-. Edna 

Newton, Audrey 
l^srnondson, Robert D. 
Opinio. (.. \. 

>. f'ai i-h. John F. 

Paulsen, Betty 

Pearson, Mr-. Henrietta 
tPfS^kney, E. B., Jr. 

Parse, W alton 
~Hav. William & 
\£ea\.-. S. 11. 
Jfoebling, Ellin 



Rolison, Estelle 
Rowan, Mr-. K. A. 

I Rw»rll. Leon 

Sadove, Mrs. Ethel I. 
Sanders, Lt R. B. 

Sanders, Mr-. R. B. 

Saseen, Freda 

Schofield, Mr-. I . K. 
USchuck, Sgt \. J. 

- M. Regina 

Sej le, Lila 

Srerakowski, Ted 

Sloan, Mrs. K. D. 

Smith. Mr-. W. EL 

&pivev. E. H. 
uStred.' R. P. 

Steinheimer, Henrietta 
V^rellj^-. John \\ . 

Stevens, Mr-. John 

Teston, Mr-. Marjorie D. 

Thigpen. Mrs. Tra\i-. Jr. 

Thorpe. Kathleen 

Turner. Man Holland 

Waldrop. Mrs. C. ML 

Williams. Wvnelle 

Wills. Libby' 

Wills. Miriam 

Wills. Reba 

Woodward. Mrs. G. D. 

W ortsman, Elise 

Wright. Barbara F. 

Zelius. Alberta 



Faculty Members and Former Faculty Members 
in the Armed Services 



Army 

Kenneth J. Duffy 
Arthur M. Gignilliat 

Arthur T. kojgaklis 

Joseph T. \-k.w 

W illiam Minor Dabney 

Robert Marvin Strahl 



I nited States Marines 

Charles B. Kestler 
Merchant Marine 

Ernest W. Braithwaite 
United States Public Health Service 

Everett L. Bishop. Jr. 



Armstrong Junior College Alumni 
in the Armed Sendees 



ARMY 



Thomas M. Vimar, Jr. 
Louis Uexander 

1 . \ . \lllo- 

( hail.-- Holman Baggfl 

Roberl Edw in Ba 
Frank Bai ragan, Jr. 



Miller Lee Bell, Jr. 

Edward H. Bennett 
Edward W. Bercegeay 
Joseph Berg 
Morris Bernstein 
Earl Bidez 
\\ Qder Blitch 



I 



\ \ \ \ \ \ II . (.1 ORG! \ 



i; 



Will Bond 

.1 ulian Mail Bono 

[Jewell) n Bowyer, I r. 
Morehouse Bowyei 

\\ illiam II. Biantian. Jr. 

James Joseph Brennan 

Sidney I .«■<■ Brew in, Jr. 

|{. M. Brown 

Earl ( Ihester Brushwood 

Courtena] Bythewood 

Decatur ( lampbell 

( reorge D. ( larlock, Jr. 

Samuel ( llemenl Catherwood, 1 1 1 

( arswell Hill Cobb 

A. J. Cohen, Jr. 

Sheftall Coleman. Jr. 

Thomas E. ( lone 
Ufred ( lonwa^ 

Gerald Cook 
Max I looper 

Alexander Watson Cordes 
\rtliur II. Cranman 
Luther W. Oibl). Jr. 
Jack H. Cronk 
James Walter Curlee 
Robert E. Davis 
Theodore Deffner 
George N. DeLoach 
Robert 0. DeLoach 
Robert Wayne Dillon 
Jack Dinerman 
W illiam S. Doolan 
\llen H. Douglas 
Barclay L. Douglas, Jr. 
Guion F. Downing 
Harry Stocktou Dreese 
JohnH. DuBois 
Joseph C. DuBois 
Armand DuPont 
John Larsen DuPont 
Lex Durham 
David Elmore 
H. Andrew Ernst, Jr. 
Harvey Ferrelle. Jr. 
Robert F. Finch 
Raymond Finney 
Theodore B. Fitzsimons, Jr. 
Thomas W. Flythe 
Jack M. Forehand 
Andrew A. Fountain, Jr. 
George H. Fries, Jr. 
Luther Powell Gahagan 
Michael K. Gannam 
Frank R. Gardner 
John C. Gardner 
Joseph Genone 
Louis M. Givens 
W illiam A. Glass 
Arthur P. Gnann, Jr. 
John W. Gnann 



Harold B.Goldberg 

I lai i \ \\,ii ren I rolson 
I Lu\. \ J. Gordon 
Roben Gordon 
L> ndell Grantham 
I [arold Greene 
Eugene W . Grinei 
( iharlee W . ( rroover 
Murray ( rrossman 
Morton \ . I [aae 
Howell H. Hanson, Jr. 
Wendell Hardwick 
Jack Hardy 
George R. Hart 
( Gordon L. Hart 
Maurice Hartnett 
()r\ille I [eckman 
Norman Bart<»n Heflin 
(/ilbtrt M. Helmken 
John C Hollingsworth 
Frank Holt 
Roberl W. Horn 
Paul Pichon Hussey 
Monroe H. Hutto 
Jonathan L. Hyrne 
Richard S. Ihley 
Paul Innecken 
Jack Jaudon 
Arthur I. Jeffords 
Howard C. Jewett. Jr. 
Darriel G. Kitchens, Jr. 
Arthur J. Klingon. Jr. 
Towns Lloyd Kohn, Jr. 
A. Theodore Kolgaklis 
Charles A. Laffitteau 
Allen Laird 
Alex T. Langston, Jr. 
J. Heath Laughlin, Jr. 
William Fred Lightsey 
\Ka B. Lines 
William Lloyd 
Walter Lowe 
Albert Lufburrow 
George McCall 
Thomas J. McGinn 
Francis P. Mclntire 
Robert C. McLaughlin 
Joseph J. McManus 
Frank H. McTeer 
Arthur Manning 
Archibald Robert Marines 
Samuel Marshall 
Cecil H. Mason, Jr. 
Joseph Mendes 
William Metzger 
Julien Michels 
Hugh K.Miller, Jr. 
Carol E. Minis. Jr. 
Harlev Mizell 



1 1 



\ R M STRO \ G Jl N I OR CO I LEGE 



Edward 1 1. Morgan 

irili'ii Moi ii~ 
James E. M urrin 
Robed Muse 
I )- mi ing Nash 
James B. Nen» ton, .1 r. 
\ tncent Noi i ie 
1 );i\ id < klrezin 
I Iora< e ( tplinger 
\l. \ ( . ( irmond 
Geoi ge I . Patrick 
.lame- Patterson 
.la..,,- E. Phail 
Richard I). Pevelei 

Mthur \\. Phillips 

I lai i \ I .. Picard 
Henrj Pike 
Harvard S. Pitts 
Ml. nO. Poppell 
Irwin I.. Potts, Jr. 
Eugene Carlton Powell 
Thomas M. Price. Jr. 
William J. Purcell 
John F<l,l Quattlebaum 
Edgar Rabey 
Wilkie Rabey, Jr. 
John F. Ranitz, Jr. 
ll.-m-N S.Ray, Jr. 
W illiam F. Reagan 
James Russell Reddish 
Robert L. Redmond 
James M. Reed, Jr. 
Samuel A. Reed 
( lecil Reinstein 
Frederick \\ . Reiser 
W illiam II. Rentz 
Jack H.Rhodes 
Douglas H.Richard 
Robert T. Ricks 
( lurtis Roane 
Nathan A. Roane, Jr. 
- _ an J. Robertson, Jr. 
( !on Robinson, Jr. 
Miller Rodgers 
Man Rosolio 
John Nairn Ross 
Barne) I.. Sadler 



Frank P. Sanders 
Jack I . Sandlin 

Semon Saul 
\ hi,-, I I .. Schwanebeck 
( hai les W . Sej le 
\\ illiam \\ . Shearouse 
Marvin Herman Shoob 
Melvin Siegel 
( lharles P. Simon 
Irving Sklansk) 
M\ ie Lee Smith 
Henry C. Smith 
James Mian Smith 
Joseph C. Smith 
Leon Smithberg 
Maurice Smithberg 
Philip Solomons 
Murray Stein 

Law rence M. Steinheimer, Jr. 
Owen Stoughton 
Jack Suggs 
James Sullivan 
John J. Sullivan 
William F. Summerell 
Thomas \. Summey, Jr. 
Hugh Taylor 
Frederick Thigpen 
Terrell Tuten 
John D. Tyre 
Jack T> son 
Charles M. Waldrop 
HowellWalker 
James L. Wallace 
Thomas F.Walsh, Jr. 
Joseph Waters 
R. Patten Watson, Jr. 
Marx Weil 
A. Glover Wells 
David Wetherhorn 
Joseph Whittle 
Davant T. Williams 
Jack Williams 
Robert Lee Williams 
< laude Marion Wilson 
James V . \\ oodward 
Rupert C. Woodward 
Robert Worsnop 
Richard A. i oung 



NAVY 



Robert W . \, lams. Jr. 
Marvin \rkin 

Samuel II. Bailey 

\\ illiam Hide/ 
Fmil Blair 
Robert F. Blake 
Milton Bra, Ilex 
\ ernon I 1 1 



W I r,»w W. Breland 

James Yates Bruce. Jr. 
Jam,- Madison ("handler 
David G. Collins 
Jam,- M. Collins. Jr. 
William ( lone 
Walter ( loolidge 
Bertram C. ( looper 
Man in Hani- ( hooper 



OF s \ \ \ N \ \ II • Gl ORG! \ 



15 



o-, .11 \l. ( rosbj 
Gordon W. Dashei 
Francis DeCourl 
Samuel Dinerman 
Hershel E. Futral 
George Herbert Griffin 
Benjamin Grinei 
John Groovei 
Richard Thomaa Hardy 
Godfrey Hyrne 
George H. Isley.Jr. 
Richard Q Jack-on 
Harrv Kaufmann 
FredOttoKessler.Jr. 
Ham Lattimore 
John C. McCaultN 
Robert P. McCuen 
J.F. McKillips,Jr. 
|),\\ itt Merritl 
Milan MikeMilich 
William 0. Miller 
< lameron 0. Mixon. Jr. 
Coleman Mopper 
Hinckley A. Murphy 



rhomai Jackson Newton 
Fenwick I attnall Nichols, Jr. 
Theodore M. Page 
Jack Pai i 

\\ illiam Pan 

Harvard S. Pitts 
Roj Rabb 
Robert Rainer 
\\ illiam M. Reid,Jr. 

VasCoG Khu.lrn.Jr. 
Marion J. Rice 
John \\ eslej Kogers 
George Seckinger 

George \\ Is Stanley 

Thomas Edmond Stevens, .1 r. 
Thomas A. Stokes, Jr. 
Thomas Reese Swinford 
George Donald Tabakian 
\\ \ckliffe C. Tnnno. Jr. 
MacDonell Tyre 
Irving Victor 
\ ii -tin Samuel Wade, Jr. 
William Earl Weatherly 
Harry Parmenter Week?. Jr. 
Francis Kenneth Wolfe, Jr. 



Edward Clyde Kicklighter 
John N. McLaughlin 
Frank J. Rhodes 
John Simpson 



UNITED STATES MARINES 

Lawrence Wade Sinclair, Jr. 

Thomas A. Smith 

Joseph Frederick Snnofsky, III 



Bernard Addy 
James Bentley 
Richard Braithwaite 



MERCHANT MARINE 



Perry Collins. Jr. 
Paul E. Graham 
James Buck Woods 



WOMEN IN THE SERVICE 



Marguerite Barnes Buchanan 

Frances E. Burton 

Jewell Aline Dixon 

Anne Douglas 

Jeannette EglofT 

Beverly Eitel 

Louise Marie Hadsell 

Sara Henderson 

Ethel Dawn Jones 

Martha Lee 

Anita Lippitt 

Phyllis Jean Meddin 



Joan Padgett 
Elizabeth Pierce 
Marie Powers 
Jule C. Rossiter 
Jean Saunders 
Constancia Smith 
Celia B. Stevens 
Suzanne C. Tharin 
Frances Vannerson 
Marguerite H. Warner 
Carolyn Anice Williams 
Marv Margaret \\ ilson 



C. Judson Allen 
Fred Chriss Allen 
Ansel D. Bailey 
Edward H. Carmichael 



DECEASED 



Bennie Bryan Davis. Jr. 
Arthur F. Davis 
Howard Harl Hansen 



16 









ARMSTRONG II MI OR CO I. LEGE 



Joseph M. Jenkins 

Mark Johnson 

Well in ki!<-\ 

Robert l>. Lanier 

1 1. Gordon Meisner 

I )an Lavender Patterson 



Robert M. Porter 
( '.nr\ Scales Reitzel, Jr. 
William B. Rice, Jr. 
W.Verderj Roberts, Jr. 
John Dearing Schlej 
James Fred Simpson 



MISSING \M) PRISONERS 



Joseph ( !raig 
\\ illiam ( . Guest, Jr. 
\\ illiam I learn 
Milton rlymes, Jr. 
William Wall Jordan* 



Homer Laughlin* 
W arren Wright Lee* 
David Middleton* 

Samuel 1 1. .^ik<-. 
Olin John Wimberly 



* Prisoners liberated 



FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room